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Full text of "University of Massachusetts Board of Trustees records, 1836-2010"

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http://archive.org/details/universityofmass5456univ 



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SOOCKEOE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



NO PAGES 1737 



THROUGH 1760. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
February 16, 195-4? 1:30 p.m., Statler Hotel, Boston, Mass. 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 



PRESENTS 



Trustees Bartlett, Brett, Boyden, Brown, 
Buxton, Cashin, Crowley, Hawes, McNamara, 
Taber, Whitmore, Governor's Secretary 
Harry Stimpson, Professor McGuirk, Dean 
Marston, Provost Mather, Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary Burke 



It was 



VOTED : To dispense with reading of the call and with 
reading of the minutes of the last meeting. 

Chairman Bartlett appointed the following Nominating 

Committee to recommend officers and committee members for the 

coming year: Trustee Vhitmore, Chairman, Trustees Brett and 



Crowley. 



Dean Marston presented a brief report of the activities 



and progress of the School of Engineering. Professor McGuirk pre- 
sented a brief report on policies and activities of the Division of 
Physical Education. 

Chairman Bartlett expressed the appreciation of the 
Board for the interesting and informative statements by these men. 

Trustee Brett reported on a recent trip to the Univer- 
sity of Connecticut to represent the Board of Trustees at a meet- 
ing of the New England land-grant college presidents and trustee 
representatives. He reported an astounding physical development 
with excellent and modern facilities to provide higher education 
for the young men and women of Connecticut. The meeting was largeljy 
devoted to the possibilities for regional cooperation in education. 



1761 



Nominating 
Committee 



1762 



TRUSTEE 



Committees 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Trustee Whitmore reported for the Nominating Committee 

and it was unanimously 

VOTED : To instruct the Secretary to cast one ballot 
for the following slate of officers and 
committee members for the ensuing " r ear: 



President, Christian A. Herter 
Chairman, Joseph V. Bartlett 
Secretary, James W. Burke 
Treasurer, Kenneth V. Johnson 



Committee on F a culty and Program of Study 

Frank L. Boyd en, Chairman John J. Desmond 

Grace A. Buxton Mrs, Elizabeth L. McNamara 

Dennis Crowley Lewis Perry 

Committee on Agriculture and Horticulture 

Alden C. Brett, Chairman L. Roy Hawes 

Harry D. Brown Ernest Hoftyzer 

Dennis M. Crowley Philip F. "Whitmore 



Committee on Buildings and Grounds 
Philip F. "Whitmore, Chairman 
Alden C. Brett 
John W. Haigis 

Committee on Finance 

John W. Haigis, Chairman 
Alden C. Brett 
William M. Cashin 



F. Roland McDermott 
Ralph F. Taber 



F. Roland McDermott 
Philip F. Whitmore 



Committee on Recognized Student Activities 

Frank L. Boyden, Chairman Ernest Hoftyzer 
Harry D. Brown Ralph F. Taber 

Grace A. Buxton 



Committee on Legislation 

William M. Cashin, Chairman 
Harry D, Brown 
John W. Haigis 

Executive Committee 

Joseph W. Bartlett, Chairman 
Frank L. Boyden 
Alden C. Brett 



Mrs. Elizabeth L. McNamara 
Ralph F. Taber 



William M. Cashin 
Philip F. Whitmore 



RUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Trustee Whitmore submitted recommendations from the 

Committee on Buildings and Grounds which met on February 10. On 

the recommendation of this committee, it was 

VOTED ; To name architects for the proposed class- 
room building in the following order of 
priority: 

1. James A. Britton of Greenfield 

2. Adden, Parker, Clinch & Crimp of Boston 

3. Perry, Shaw, Hepburn, Kehoe & Dean of Boston 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Buildings and 

Grounds, it was 

VOTED; To accept the offer of Mr. Hall Nichols, 
Director of the Division of Building Con- 
struction, to provide funds so that the 
Trustees might prepare a master plan for 
future physical development of the Univer- 
sity and to thank Mr. Nichols for his 
efforts in behalf of the University. 

In the absence of Trustee Haigis, Chairman of the Finance 

Committee, Treasurer Johnson presented recommendations from that 

committee which met on February 10 and on the recommendation of the 

Finance Committee, it was 

VOTED ; To establish the Buttrick Scholarship Fund 
as an endowment fund of the University with 
a principal of $7,500, the value- placed on 
the 750 shares of the 7% cumulative preferred 
stock of the David Buttrick Company (par 
value $10 per share) and direct that while the 
fund is invested in stock of the David 
Buttrick Company this fund be segregated from 
the pool investment account, that it be 
accounted for separately, and that the income 
therefrom be used in accordance with the terms 
of the gift. Should the stock be sold or 
called the fund shall then be considered and 
treated as a part of the pool investment 
account of the Trustees and the income shall 
be used in accordance with the terms of the 
gift. 



1763 



Classroom 
Building 



Campus 
Plan 



Buttrick 

Scholarship 

Fund 



1764 



TRUSTEE 



Sprague 
Electric 
Company- 
Scholarship 



Stocks 



Fire 
Association 



Blanket 
Bonds 



Terms of 
Employment 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

On the recommendation of the Finance Committee, it was 

VOTED ; To accept the Sprague Electric Company 

grant and add this income and any future 
grants of the same nature to the unre- 
stricted trust funds of the University. 

On the recommendation of the Finance Committee, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth ¥. 
Johnson, for and on behalf of the 
Trustees of the University, to subscribe 
to 36 shares of the common stock of the 
Fire Association of Philadelphia at $22.50 
per share plus one right per share, using 
the 36 rights belonging to the Trustees 
of the University of Massachusetts. 

It was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth W. 
Johnson, to increase the primary 
commercial blanket liability bond cover- 
ing all employees of the University to 
£20^000 because of the increase in state 
funds, student funds, and endowment funds 
in the custody of the University. 

It was 

VOTED : To make no change in security holdings 
for the present. 

Dr. Boyd en, Chairman of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study reported on the meeting of his committee on 

February 16. On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty 

and Program of Study, it was 

VOTED : To approve the attached terms of employ- 
ment for members of the professional staff 
who will be employed on a calendar year 
basis. 

It was also 

VOTED : To approve the attached terns of employ- 
ment for members of the professional staff 
who will serve for the academic year. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Amherst 



MEMORANDUM OF APPOINTMENT 
(Calendar Year) 



Date 



To 



Upon the recommendation of 



I hereby appoint you to the position of_ 



at a salary of_ 



__per year, effective on 



1765 



or as soon thereafter as you report for duty. 



If you accept this appointment it will be understood 
that you agree to the terms of employment as stated on the back 
of this sheet. Please acknowledge your acceptance on the en- 
closed form. 



President 



1766 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



I 



TERMS OF EMPLOYMENT 



1. All appointments to the staff of the University are con- 
tingent upon annual appropriations by the Legislature, 



Appointment to a salaried position is authoritative only 
when confirmed in writing by the President of the Univer- 
sity and according to the terms specified in such con- 
firmation. 



Appointments to the professional staff, unless otherwise 
stated, are for one year at a time during the first three 
years of service. At the end of the third year tenure 
may be granted by the President which will be effective 
without reappointment as long as service in and to the 
University is mutually satisfactory. 



4.. The annual period of service under this appointment is 
12 months, with vacation of one month allowed in each 
full year of service. 



Duties may be assigned to the appointee in resident in- 
struction, research, extension teaching, and/or other 
programs of the University as required. 



6. Salaries are paid in 12 equal installments on the first 
of each month for the preceding month. 



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TRUSTEE 



1767 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Amherst 



MEMORANDUM OF APPOINTMENT 
(Academic Year) 



Date 



To 



Upon the recommendation of 



I hereby appoint you to the position of__ 



at a salary of 



j>er year, effective on_ 



or as soon thereafter as you report for duty. 

If you accept this appointment it will be understood 
that you agree to the terms of employment as stated on the back 
of this sheet. Please acknowledge your acceptance on the en- 
closed form. 



President 



1768 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



TEEMS OF EMPLOYMENT 



1. All appointments to the staff of the University are con- 
tingent upon annual appropriations by the Legislature. 



o 



Appointment to a salaried position is authoritative only 
when confirmed in writing by the President of the Univer- 
sity and according to the terms specified in such confir- 
mation. 



3. Appointments to the professional staff, unless otherwise 
stated, are for one year at a time during the first three 
years of service. At the end of the third year tenure 
may be granted by the President which will be effective 
without reappointment as long as service in and to the 
University is mutually satisfactory. 



4.. The annual period of service under this appointment is 
for the academic year. 



5. Duties may be assigned to the appointee in resident in- 
struction, research, extension teaching, and/or other 
programs of the University as required. 



6. Salaries are paid in 12 equal installments on the first 
of each month. 



RUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it "was 

VOTED: To approve the following new courses of 
study and changes in the course of study. 

It was 

VOTED : To approve adoption of the following new 
courses of graduate study. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was 

VOTED : To approve the abolition of the practice 
of decreasing of grade points by the Ad- 
ministration to penalize student absences 
and approve adoption of the following 
attendance regulations. 

The attendance of students at all regularly scheduled 
classes at the University of Massachusetts is expected. 
No administrative control of attendance shall be exercised 
except as hereinafter provided. 

In case of illness, students are to explain their 
absences directly to their instructors. The mark of a 
student who has met the requirements of the instructor 
in making up all his work shall not be reduced because 
of absence for illness. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was 

VOTED : To approve the following policy relative 
to ROTC training for transfer students: 

Students transferring from any other institution not 
offering ROTC training to the University of Massachusetts 
who qualify as full-time bona fide sophomores, juniors, 
or seniors will not be required to take basic ROTC train- 
ing. 

Veterans who enroll under the above stated policy 
and for whom part or all of the basic training require- 
ments are waived should be given the discretionary right 
of enrollment in ROTC for progress toward a possible 
commission. 



1769 



New 
Courses 



Student 

Attendance 

Regulations 



ROTC Policy 
for Transfer 



Transfer 
Students 



1770 



TRUSTEE 



Honorary 
Degrees 



Annual 
Report 



Agricultural 
Marketing 
Act Agreement 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was 

VOTED : To accept the attached list of appoint- 
ments, promotions, resignations, death 
and retirements for the year January 1 
through December 31 > 1953 and approve 
the appointments and promotions listed 
therein. 

On the recommendation of the University Committee on 

Honorary Degrees and of the Provost, it was 

VOTED ; To award the following honorary degrees 
at a special University convocation to 
be held in March of 1954- and with the 
understanding that the recipients must 
be present in person: Richard Eodgers - 
Doctor of Humane Letters and Oscar 
Hammerstein II - Doctor of Humane Letters. 

On the recommendation of the University Committee on 

Honorary Degrees and of the Provost, it was 

VOTED: To award the following honorary degrees 
at the June 1954- commencement with the 
understanding that the recipients must be 
present in person to receive the award: 

Murray Danforth Lincoln - Doctor of Agriculture 

Oswald Tippo - Doctor of Science 

Leonard W. Morrison - Doctor of Political Science 

In the absence of President Van Meter, Provost Mather 

presented the annual report for the University and it was 

VOTED: To accept the report as presented and ex- 
tend to the Provost a vote of confidence 
and special commendation for his faithful 
and energetic work during the absence of 
the President. 

On the recommendation of the Treasurer and Provost, it 



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was 



VOTED: To authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth V. Johnson, 
to sign a contract with the United States De- 
partment of Agriculture renewing the agricultural 
marketing act agreement. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Treasurer's report having been previously received 

and read by members of the Board, it was 

VOTED ; To approve the report for the year ending 
June 30, 1953 as presented. 

It was 

VOTED: To authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth W. Johnson, 
to sign a contract with the Veterans Administra- 
tion for education and training under Public Law 
16 and Public Law 34-6 covering the course of in- 
struction in the Winter School for Turf Managers 
for the period January 4-? 1954- through March 12, 
1954. 

The Trustees discussed timing of the construction of the 
dormitories by the Massachusetts Building Association. It was re- 
called that the Association has received authority from the Legisla 
ture for the construction of two buildings - one for women and one 
for men. The building for women is rapidly nearing completion. 
The one for men has been delayed in view of the policy of the 
Board not to admit additional students until needed classroom 
facilities are provided. 

Provost Mather said that the University could use the 
men' s dormitory even though no additional students were to be ad- 
mitted. The dormitory could be filled by moving students from the 
state-owned county circle dormitories, and filling the county 
circle dormitories with Stockbridge students now lodged in the town 
The Trustees emphasized that only in this manner would they approve 
construction of this additional dormitory as the Board must con- 
tinue to follow the program outlined before Governor Herter of hold- 
ing enrollments down until more classrooms can be constructed. 

With the understanding that construction of an additional 

men's dormitory will not require admission of additional students, 
it was 



1771 



Treasurer' s 
Report 



Turf 

Managers 
Course 



Dormitory 
for Men 



1772 



TRUSTEE 



Resolution on 

Commissioner 

Broderick 



Commonwealth 
Scholarships 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To request the Massachusetts Building 
Association to proceed with the con- 
struction of a doimitory for men stu- 
dents to be completed by the fall of 
1955. 

It was unanimously 

VOTED ; To adopt the following resolution and 
to instruct the Secretary to send copy 
to Commissioner Broderick. 



HENRY T. BRODERICK 

Be it resolved that the Trustees of the University 
of Massachusetts express their appreciation of the de- 
voted service rendered by Henry T. Broderick, Commissioner 
of Agriculture and University Trustee 1951 to 1954-* 

Mr. Broderick brought to the Board a keen insight 
into the problems of Agriculture and an abiding faith 
in the democratic solution of these problems. Ever in- 
terested in the values of higher education, he joined 
wholeheartedly in the task of developing a greater Uni- 
versity that would serve not only Agriculture but the 
entire Commonwealth. 

The Trustees extend to Commissioner Broderick 
their sincere best wishes and their gratitude for 
his faithful service. 

Provost Mather said that two freshman students to whom 

Commonwealth Scholarships had been awarded have withdrawn from 

the University. These are Ralph Pittsley and Richard P. Lyons. 

After discussion and on the recommendation of the Scholarship 

Committee and of Provost Mather, it was 

VOTED : To award Commonwealth Scholarships not 
used by Messrs. Pittsley and Lyons to 
John Hayes, Jr. of the class of 1957 
and to Phillip Bamford of the class of 
1957. 

Provost Mather said that as an outgrowth of a meeting 

with land- grant college presidents at Storrs, Connecticut, it was 

decided to implement regional cooperation in education by 






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NEW aNDEEGEADUATE COURSES 

Zoology 78 II GMBTICS OF ANIMAL POPULATIONS, The principles of the 
genetics of animal populations with emphasis upon its basic 
techniques and methods, its goals and contributions* The 
populations approach to the study of the origin of species and 
human genetics will also be considered. 

Prerequisite, Zoology 53 or its equivalent. Permission of the 
instructor. 1 2-hour lecture- 

discussion period per week. Credit* 2 

Bacteriology 96 STOBIBS 3F SPECIAL MICROBIAL GBDOPS. It is the intention 
in this course to study the biology of certain groups of micro- 
organisms not given consideration, or at the most only briefly 
mentioned, in other courses offered in the department. The 
didactic material will cover the autotrophic bacteria, photo- 
synthetic bacteria, actinomycetec, ryxobacteria, chlamydobacteria 
and spirochaetes. The course will consist of leotures, laboratory 
demonstrations, and literature reviews. Three credits allocated ' 
to one lecture and four laboratory hours per week are proposed. 
1 hr. lecture, 4 hrs. laboratory Credits 3 

Business Administration 73 TAX ACCOUICTIKG. This course examines the 
principles of income taxation as applied to individuals and 
emphasizes the application of income tax laws in corporate 
accounting and reports. Prerequisite, Accounting 61. Credits 3 

Business Administration 73 PBQBLHMS IK INDUSTRIAL MANAGEMENT. An inten- 
sive analysis, through study of actual cases, of the problems 
that confront managers in the manufacturing division of a busi- 
ness. Prerequisite Industrial Administration 63, Credits 3 

Business Administration 80 PBOBLSMS IK MARKETING. A study of problems 
of market management, especially the interrelation between re- 
search planning, execution of sales programs, and market con- 
trol. The effects of various marketing policies upon indivi- 
dual firms and upon industry are examined. Prerequisite, 
' Marketing 53 and consent of the instructor. Credits 3 

Zoology 64 BIOLOGY OF PE0T0Z0A. An introduction to the morphology, 

systematica, physiology, and ecology of Protozoa with a con- 
sideration of the contributions to the problems of biology 
made through the study of these organisms. Given in alter- 
nate years, beginning 1954-55. 1 lecture hour, 1 2-hour, 
and 1 3-hour laboratory periods. Prerequisite Zoology 1 and 
permission of the instructor. Credits 3 

Revision of credits in Entomology %$ - Advanced Beekeeping from three 
(3) to two (2). 1 class hour 1-2 hour laboratory. 



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30 



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„,<,.<, *<* aptc awt) CRAFTS Introduction to design and execution 
ft*. *™<f^J» t ^™J T ^J &pie<i to vork „lth children in schooXs, 
playgrounds, suiner camps; and for any age in recreational 
leadtrshit. and occupational therapy. Opportunity will he 
offered for "or* in several of the following, wood and leather 
work, hlock printing fingerpainting, etching, knotting, o* ^^ 



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s related to 
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trolei :mirite, 

3 credits 

t° 0l l- report cards, 

educational 

; e %f b , of 

r elementary teac ) . 

Ectuc* element ^ credits 

1953-54 ar alternate year. 

n3 in cv 'evel 

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effects of 

3 credits 



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^ eve - ^ u , « -n^+v vUVi -inoroDriate techniques for trie 
«SSdf3rUkttos ^publishing reports of oroblans. 



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UNIVERSm OF MASSACHUSETTS, AMHEKST, MASSACHUSETTS 
List of Professional Appointments, Promotions, Retirements, Resignations 

January 1 - December 31* 1953 
APPOINTMENTS 

Administration 

Robert Leavltt, Executive Secretary, Associate Alumni, July 1, 1953 

Instruction 

Herschel G. Abbott, Instructor in Forestry, September 1, 1953, |3,720 
Doris Eo Abramson, Instructor in English, February 1, 1953, $3,720 

ton P. Baldauf, Instractor in. Food Technology, September 1* 1953» ? ft/20 

-ne Barthe, Instructor in taance Languages, September 1, 1953 d/3 time; 

aodori L. Batke, Instructor in Chemical Engineering, September 1, 1953, f^ 20 
Benjemia S. Benjaminov, Instructor in Chemistry, September 1, 1953, (1/2 time), $1,800 
flobert F. Biehler, Instructor in Psychology, September 1* 19^3, /^,720 
Robert M. Boland, Assistant Professor of Music, October 16, 1953, U-M ^me), ip.,MQ 
Fred V, CahiU, Jr., Professor of Government, September 1, 3-953, $0,180 
Den S. Collins, Instructor in English, September 1, 1953, *3,720 f . . g6o 

Hichard K. Cornfoot, Instructor in Floriculture, September 1, 1953 (1/2 time), $1,800 
Efrtaxd L. Davis, Instructor in Botany, September 1, 1953, §3,720 

mour Epstein, Assistant Professor of Psychology, September 1, 1953, *4.,5&0 
Xteight E. ErUek, Instructor in Psychology, September 1, 1953i * 3 r^2 9ft 
B. Farrington, Instructor in Geology, September 1, 1953, *£»'*> 
an L. Field, Instructor in Psychology, September 1, 19 53, |3, '20 
Alrion S. Fish, Jr., Instructor in Pomology, September 1, J 9 »,jp»«0 

Foibes, Instractor in Home Economics, September 1, 1953, f> l f?. . 

.e Qeorgantas, Instructor in Romance Languages, September 1, 1953, d/2 tame; f 

EicI JS'^foillis, Instructor in Business Administration, £f^^k 19 g'^» TO 
Mrs. Sandra G. Goding, Assistant Physician, October 10, 1953 (V2tuw)» $ 2 >940 
Levis C. Goldstein, Instructor in Zoology, September 1, 1953, J3, ( so 
Peter B. Gore, Instructor in French, September 1, -953, (1/4 time), &jo 
Mrs. Vilma V. Joa, Instructor in Russian, September 1, 1953, (1/4 time), ^30 
Jane T. Judgo, Instructor in Chemistry, October 1, 195J (1/2 to «>» w*?i , Q -~ 
John H, Karlson, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, September 1,1953, 



Carolyn H. Kendrow, Instructor in Chemistry, September 1, 1953, $3*720 . „„ 
David V. Knndsen, Instructor in Electrical Engineering, September 1, 1953, Wit f*> 
Henry Kratz, Jr., Instructor in German, September 1, 1953, J3,720 g , 

Lorraine D. Lavallee, Instractor in Mathematics, September 1, ^53, (V2 ttoe)^,BbO 
John J. Lawler, Instructor in Electrical Engineering, September 1, 1953 (1/2 tame;, 

Lowell E. Lingo, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering, September 1, 1953, 

Mrs. Gertrude H. McPherson, Instructor in Sociology, September 1, 1953 (l/2 time), 
$1,860 



Appointments ■- 2 

Mary A. Maher, Pressor and Head of Division of 3urstog, October 1, 1953, «6,1S0 

Ss C. Maimer, instructor in Government, September 1, 1953, 33,720 

J. Paul Mather. Provost, February 1, 1953, »',?o y , «, 7;)n 

Clir V. Saylor, Instructor in Mathematics, September 1, 1953, »$» 

AuSt HevlSder, Jr., Instructor to Mathematics .»»*«$£, S?^ * 3 ' 

Kn H. *ickereon, Instructor to Botany, Jjg-^, 1 ' »» .^/» 

,„ h o'Donnell, Instructor to Education, February 1, 19 J3, «>«" . , . 

fiorge J. OMfcw, Instructor to Civil Engineering, September 1, 1953 (1/2 time), 

Mrs. Krtoe J. Padelford, Assistant Professor of Education, September 1, 1953, 

T AlWt Perfe ^Instructor to Anteal Husbandry, September 1, 1953, 53,720 
jiiSn J, ?err£ Assistant Professor of Recreation, September 1, 1953 (1/2 time), 

MnJ£'? °Ptoa Instructor to Mathematics, October 1, 1953 (lA time) , $930 
ISSf S Pire Inst^ctor to Agricultural Engineering, February 1, 19 53, ,f ,720 

Jerome "othenberg/tostractor in Economics, September 1, 1953, $3^720 
£2 E KalrrSSn^fS Kto^s'Acll^^tion/se^ber 1, 

^old 9 |!'s&?Assistant Professor of ^^7^^', *»» ^ 
Benjamin M. Shaub, Instructor to Geology, September 1, 1953 W* ^'i *"" 
XneT^aube, Instructor to Romance Ungw, SepW.be r 1, 19 fy*%™ f ^ 
. M. ?eum, Instructor to Romance Languages, October 5, 1953, W; 'i ™»ej» * ' 

Eta A. Veidhaas, Jr., Instructor in ^ to f Si^Sne'rto^'s^tmber 1, 
orge P. Veldmann, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engine-ring, oepw* , 

ThoJ^UkScn, Instructor to Sociology, September 1, 1953, *ij™ 
Karol Si Wisnlaeki, Instructor to Bacteriology, September 1, 1953, $3,720 

EXPERIME8T STATION 

Allan B. Barton, Associate Professor, Research, Agricultural Engineering, 

Leo P^ento^nsdclS Research, Veterinary Science, June 15, 1953, S3.720 
cSffo^lTctater, Instructor, Research, Shade Tree Laboratory, May 18, 1953, 

Robert L. Ticknor, Aesistant Professor, Research, Nursexycultnre, Decenoer a., 

1953, $4,560 B ^. Mwh Feeds & Fertilizers, September 15, 1953, $3,720 

Mildred Vender Pol, Instructor, Research, Feeds & ^er^i^e, ^ ***»• 



EXTENSION SERVICE 



Vtoifred I. Eastwood, Professor of Home Economics, ff «? *'. ^Vf'^A L.560 
Rosa M. Starkey, Assistant Professor of Home Economics, August 17, 1953, *4,?~ 



PROMOTIONS 

Instruction 

Lawrence M, Bartlett, Associate Professor of Zoology from Assistant Professor 

J Murray Elliot, Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry from Instructor 

Ralph L. francs, Head of Department of Bacteriology from Professor Q ~ Mfl ^ 

James K. Ferrigno, Associate Professor of Romano© Languages from Assietant professor 

Albert E. Goss, Associate Professor of Psychology from Assistant Proiessor • 

John F. Hanson, Associate Professor of Insect Morphology from Assistant Professor 

William K. Hefner, Assistant Professor of Business Administration from Instructor 

BronislavM. lionigberg, Assistant Professor of Zoology from Instructor 

Sidney V. Kauffman, Head of Department of Physical Education for Men from Professor 

Robert B. Livingston, Professor of Botany from Associate Professor 

John B. Lcngstaff , Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering from Assistant 

Professor . 

Mauler- Handel. Assistant Professor of Bacteriology from Instructor 
Robert L. Elvers, Assistant Professor of Business Administration from Instructor 
Harold V. Snart, Associate Professor of Business Lav from Assistant Professor 
Marlon E. Smith, Assistant Professor of Entomology from Instructor 
Mrs. Margaret K. Vilhela, Assistant Professor of Home Economics from Instructor 

Experiment Station 

Villia E« Tomlinson, Jr., Associate Professor, Research, Entomology from 
Assistant Professor 

Control Service 
Bertram Gersten, Assistant Professor, Research, Feeds and Fertilizers from Instructor 



RESIGNATIONS 

Instruction 

Robert W. Allen, Instructor in Electrical Engineering, July 31, 1953 

Pdchard Athertcn, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, August 31, wj> 

Leon A. Bradley, Head of Department of .Bacteriology, May 28, 1953 (af^er leave of 

s.bsencoY 
Robert S. Burpo, Jr., Assistant Professor of Physics, February 11, 1953 (After 

Military Leave) - 

Joseph D. Camobell, Instructor in Olericulture, August 31, 1953 
Ann B. Carlin', Assistant Professor of Education, August 31, 1953 
A. George Davis, Instructor in Mathematics, August 31, 1953 
Arthur G. Dodge, Jr., Instructor in Forestry, July 31, 1953 
Russell E. Dutcher, Instructor in Geology, August 31, 1953 

Eugene J. Finnegan, Instructor in Dairy Industry, August 31, 1953 ..._ 

William H. Fitzpatrick, Instructor in Food Technology, March 31, 1953 (after military 

leave! 
Thomas H. Farr, Instructor in Entomology, August 31, 1953 
Alexander M. Oruickshank, Instructor in ChauL&try* August 31, 1953 

William M, (irimshaw, Professor of Recreation, August 31, 1953 



Resignations -2 



SS"£ D at Si ISctorVcn^K ft 31, 1953 ' " 

Edward D. hall, ins^^w* ^* -r«v»«ni JaI Engineering, August 31 » 195.? 

^ ^ralla' « S £SS2Si2wt V S» 

Sric/nt l£aelroSftostructor 1> Sociology, Augst 31 , 19 3 
? ?!„r „-tt a Instructor in Bomance Languages, August 31, 1953 
KariMi ^. Liotta, inst^eTO Mathematics, August 31, 1953 

Oscar I. Litoj.1, Assistant. "",%„.,,,_ Iul „ m 1953 
Uslter B. MacGrath, Instructor in Zoology, ***&>>■» t 7 ', 10 c-j 

^ars^a, instructor in «£~%#£ gfe 1W 

Eucene C. Putala, Instructor in Botany, August 3A, jw 9 3 

Experiment Station . 

Stephen B. Uitchner, Professor - ^f^fSef^rgy/^ruVS 1953 

SK. Parso^'mstructor, Be «^*>g^X%£ ^ptenber 30, 1953 , 
Gilbert Raising, Jr., Instructor, R ^earcn, Poult^ "^EweStuw, Se ptember 18,1953 
Hichard J. Stadtherr, Assistant Professor, Research, -urseryc 

Joseph A. Bart, Instructor '^^^^^^i^^^'^ *'"» 
Hobert T. Wetterbee, Assistant Professor, Eesearcn, reeaa m 



Extension Service 



jsx&ensxau wrvj-w , „- . Q .^ 



DEATH 



George F. Pushee, Assistant Professor of Agricultural peering, May 19, 1953 

Harold M. Gore, Head of Department of Physical "»«««»'"[ *"? 8 gh "' ' 
SyT. nJ£Tib*«ri« Professor of Poultry Hu#andry, August 31, 1953 
William 1. Machmer, Dean, January 31, 1953 



- 






UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

recommending New England students desiring certain special courses 
of instruction to whichever of the six New England land-grant 
colleges can best provide that instruction. The group felt that 
the University of Massachusetts has unique offerings in Food 




ty'M 4 * 



iATf3*/Jt£cR. 



Secretary 



Chairman 



1773 



Regional 
Cooperation 



Technology and Landscape Architecture and would like to recommend 

Special 

students to Massachusetts for work in these fields when Massachu- Courses 



setts is ready to accept out-of-state students. After discussion, 

it was 

VOTED : To offer second priority (first priority 
to Massachusetts residents) for admission 
to the course in Food Technology and the 

course in Landscape Architecture, to 
qualified residents of the New England 
area. 

The meeting was adjourned at U- 30 p.m. 



1774 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 






TRUSTEE 



X ( i o 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



STEE 



1776 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 






TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
May 11, 1954-, 12:4-5 p.m., Statler Hotel, Boston, Mass. 
Chairman Bartlett presiding 



PRESENT; 



Governor Herter, Trustees Bartlett, 
Brown, Miss Buxton, Cashin, Crowley., 
Desmond, Haigis, Haves, Mrs. McNamara, 
Taber, Whitmore, Governor' s Secretary, 
Harry Stimpson, Provost Mather, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Burke 



It was 



VOTED; To dispense with reading of the call and 
with reading of the minutes of the last 
meeting. 

Chairman Bartlett read the following letter from Presi- 
dent Ralph A. Van Meter. 

April 26, 1954 

Mr. Joseph W. Bartlett 
Chairman, Board of Trustees 
University of Massachusetts 
294- Washington Street 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Dear Mr. Bartlett: 

After careful consideration and consultation with my Resignation of 
doctors, I have decided, reluctantly, to resign from the Presidency Dr. Ralph A, 
of the University of Massachusetts. This is for reasons of health 
which T think you understand. This resignation is to become 
effective at the will of the Board of Trustees. 

As I leave the Presidency, I appreciate more than ever 
before, the unfaltering support and the invaluable assistance of 
the Board of Trustees. No president could ever ask for more. 

I am sure it would be all right with Dr. Durgin if I 
were to consult with you at any time in connection with this 
matter. 

Very truly yours, 

/s/ R. A. Van Meter 
R.A.V. etv 



1777 



1778 



TRUSTEE 



Honorary Degree 



Doctor of Laws 



Jean Paul 

Mather, Presi- 
dent of the 
University 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To accept President Van Meter's resignation 
with deep regret and with gratitude for the 
splendid service which he has rendered. The 
resignation is to be effective at the close 
of business on May 14, 19 54* 

It was also 

VOTED; To award the degree Doctor of Laws, Honoris 
Causa, to Dr. Ralph A. Van Meter at the 
June Commencement in 1954- and to direct 
that the citation for the degree be in- 
scribed in the records of the Board. 

The Trustees discussed the filling of the vacancy in the 

office of President. Trustee Crowley suggested that the Board 

should delay making a permanent appointment until a later date. 

However, after discussion, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To elect Jean Paul Mather as l^th Presi- 
dent of the University of Massachusetts 
effective May 15, 1954-. 

Mr. Mather expressed his appreciation to the Trustees for 
their confidence in him and also his gratitude for their constant 
support during his service as Provost. He commended Governor 
Herter and Mr. Stimpson for the special help extended to him on 
many occasions. 

Governor Herter suggested that the Trustees should give 
careful consideration to the future physical development of the 
University so that the aesthetics of the campus will be protected 
as the University develops. He said that he understood the desire 
of the Trustees to employ a variety of architects for different 
campus buildings. He pointed out, however, that in doing this 
there is always the possibility that conflicting styles and pro- 
portions may mar or even destroy the total aesthetic effect. 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The Governor urged that the Board seek some means to 
provide for uniformity in architectural planning. Perhaps the 
Board could employ a firm to act as architectural coordinator. 

Chaiiman Bartlett thanked the Governor for his 

suggestion and for his interest in the welfare of the University, 

and it was unanimously 

VOTED ; To instruct the ^resident to consult with 
the Director of the Division of Building. 
Construction to bring about the coordina- 
tion of architectural styles for buildings and 
other campus improvements as suggested by 
Governor herter. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Agriculture 

and Horticulture, it was 

VOTED ; To authorize the administration to accept 
such new Federal funds as may be made 
available beginning July 1, 195A and to 
establish suitable projects for the ex- 
penditure of the Federal funds and to 
carry out the work so planned. 

It was 

VOTED; To authorize the establishment of such 

new positions as are needed to carry out 
the new agricultural programs with the 
salaries to be paid from -Federal funds 
up to the normal turnover rate now pre- 
vailing at the University. 

It was 

VOTED ; To authorize the administration to work 
out with the proper authorities the re- 
distribution of State and Federal funds 
as applied to salaries in the University 
so as to provide the flexibility needed 
to carry out both the new Federally 
supported programs and the reorganization 
program approved by the Board. 



1779 



Architectural 
coordination ii 
styles for 
buildings 



Federal 
Funds 



1780 



TRUSTEE 



Terns of 
Employment 



Cranberry- 
Industry 



* 



New undergraduate 
courses 



Master of 
Science in 
Agricultural 
Engineering 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was 

VOTED ; To approve the attached terms of em- 
ployment for members of the pro- 
fessional staff in Agriculture and 
Horticulture who will be on a 12 
months' basis. 

It was 

VOTED ; To discontinue arrangements with the 
National Cranberry Association and 
in the future have its cranberry crop 
harvested by inviting bids from inde- 
pendent contractors. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of ^tudy, it was 

VOTED; To approve the following new under- 
graduate courses and changes in 
courses; 

It was 

VOTED ; To approve the following new graduate 
program leading to the degree Master 
of Science in Agricultural Engineering, 
requirements for the degree to be as 
follows; 

1. The credit requirements as prescribed by the 
Graduate School, but at least 21 semester 
hours will be taken in departments of the 
School of Engineering. 

2. Not more than 8 semester hour credits shall 
be allowed for the thesis. 

3. At least 12 semester hours shall be obtained 
from courses of the 200 series exclusive of 
the thesis. 

The curriculum is to consist of a Core and selected 
courses in support of the major investigation. The 
Core shall consist of the thesis, seminar, and 12 
semester hours of other courses listed below; 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHOSETTS 
Amherst 

School of Agriculture and Horticulture 



«t 



mm*WJA OF APFOINTM©^ 



( Calendar Year) 



To 



Upon the recommendation of 

I hereby appoint you to the position o£ t 



tSsrstrec^q'-ttCTo mw i m — iiii i iii ■nwT-» i. rc —Ma^«n <i » iTwii»n«-HMW» i l — ■ i 



a 



at a salary of L ., 1 , L _. 1 , mllu ,„ M ,„. per year, effective on 

or as soon thereafter as you report for duty* 



If you accept this appointment it id.ll be understood that you agree to 
the terns of employment as stated on the hack of this sheet* Please 
acknowledge your acceptance on the enclosed form. 



President 



TEE48 OF S-irXCBiE 



Xc All appointments to the staff of the University are contingent 
upon annua! appropriations by the Legislature. 

2» Appointment to a salaried position is authoritative only when 
confirmed in writing by the President of the University and 
according to the terns specified in such confirmation© 

3* Appointments to the professional staff* unless otherwise stated^ 
are for one year at a time during the first three years of ser- 
vice* At the end of the third, year tenure may be granted by the 
President which will be effective without reappointment as long 
as service in and to the University is mutually satisfactory/* 

,£• The annual period of service under this appointment is 12 months* 
with vacation of one aonth allowed in each full year of service* 

5* Duties way be assigned to the appointee in resident ins traction, 
research, extension teaching, and/or other programs of the Uni- 
versity as required* 

6. Salaries are paid in 12 ecual installments on the first of each 
month for the preceding month* 

7* Except under circumstances approved by the President, the follow- 
ing limitations pertaining to professional employment outside 
your regular work will apply; 

a« You may not accept outside assignments or employment 
for pay within the CcramoHwealth in any capacity re- 
lated to your professional employment* 

b* Ion may be permitted under specific arrangements 
approved by the Dean to accept employment or assign- 
ments for pay outside the Commonwealth in the capacity 
related to your professional employment* 

c* As a public service responsibility, you may accept 
without pay ov perquisite 9 and with the approval of 
the Dean, offices in agricultural organisations 
lated to your professional assignment* 



That the ^thesaties Department be permitted to experonant 
«?+h <d.x -actions in a freshman Mathematics course for 
Li^rat Armors for one year beginning September 192*, 
vith course descriptions as follows* 

Mathematics 1. Introductory Mathoaatics 1* 
*'n<*v*etic and axiomatic concepts* number a 

££^ B . ^ Btedy of »taT *, Iflsbraica 

and by the methods of analyi 

Nattitattics 2. Introductory Mathematics II ; A 

cLr*» intended for stud whoso curricula *<« 

iustTone year of Mathematics. A corf- tone 
&2ucs l s tacli topics frc ^^ 

statistics and aatheiatics of fiiHHua 

M«+wi&+i^ '•*■ Introductory Mathersatic XV. itinua* 

Son "ol statics 1 for those students intending to tee , 
tother courses in Mathematics. Analytic gentry and 
trigonometry. 

mat tanawwe Architected naj or s be permitted &» Ctoistry 

f SwiSSd* Botany I rather than a full year of Chesietiy. 

-hat Govnowt 25 be redtflMd to read as follows* 
M* ZAUfVlKai WHEHE* ■* study of principles., 
£w7*»«"U and proUte. of toerlca, Go.ermest.* 

That G^enment »JSnWWE GOVSPffi gSitaLne 

^Tf^Atj^s^ r/H/iRn'MTK^., M A study oi tn^ poiaw — fc*-«w*> 

EDHDPSUL, LOVBt-..^.-. a w* jr / fl , aaa countries"* 

of Great Britain,, France, 8.S.S.R. ana other -*»« 

Th*t Qoveiment 2B STATS AKD LOCAL become Gownmeftt 54, STATE 
GfiJftB OTWwT -A study of state politics organ satio; 
functions, with emphasis en the role of the st.ite in o 
Federal e^stea" to alternate with, Government 64, MDHI< 

That Government 67 become Goverment 70 for schedule convsni, 

»»™ant73. COMPARATIVE GOV! /\*£2^ E^* 

of C «ot«v >«1 • ^ 

ideology, si ndayaamlpsol polit 

requisite 

on 
Go 

an »««, ! 



CRAEGE 



CHANGE 



CHAHGE 



HEW 



m 






.. _ 56 H . This course inclm study 

f; the f alternatives In e« f neerxng 

eWand minto Ante, evaluation 01 pw- 

^ls 4r n ilrttier, i pwtiox», the evaluam. 

oublie activities', the o and lUe of sal iteas 01 

I ri, end *i manufacturing lot bises, 

, B and .aohines. 3 class ■««», Prereoursites ,c^25» 
Mat-;, 6 or Mata, ^9* ■ 

That toe Economic. . IICK - for nowaajom - creuit be 

increased from. 2 credits 
Sanie catalogue 

, •,* ti.-wT.-^o-ii ■ T now a 3 crsd.it course 

CHANGE That Economics 60 HOJojih-JL*, ■ - --^ 

■■■ changed to two 2 courses as iolj-ovss 

Herae Be. 60 H3U CK-IEKT, A study of selection, etr., and 

operation of h ousel :0 id equipment and the ,eohar ; ical *™*$*£- 
volved* Actual tfoxk vith equipment anu fieln tops .ro £^**' 
1 class Lour, 1 3-hour laboratory ■*■ " 

Home ire. a LE40NSTF.\TI39 TECHKK.U^ foasis is given to the 

mioses and fceCmlcues of demonstration both in prepare. ti.n of 
SETS tt£ ;"" of -ecuipment, *£* application to M£g, ex- 
tension, and business 2 2~kour laboratory, ? ^^ uisit ^^ 2 
Hoae, Ee» 30 and 51. 

r^irOT hQ V-T'OV'L^ OF PHYSICAL GBOGEAHfil A systematic study 
o^f^d'sl^ioi^hic provinces, clioiate, vegetation, soils, 
^^ S^Sb^ toSir eff« ^Pon mankind, Die geographic 

relatio a to land foruis will be stressed , ^^ ^ 

class Jaour 
I Technology 98. (U) Sensor/ Evaluation Methods. - to intro- 
duction to ser asursaents in the f^f • "J^et-ion 
> of food, hair statical interpretation, 
taste. aaer ' ts * application + ~ lood 
ouali f X ° r3 ° ray ' Credit 

Oses j A 

associ - S 4^ rOVa 

he aeasurement of tu^ 

™ 5 . th ,ing, measurement, and use of 

forest ore s. Open to non-ma; only. 

a Class hours; 1 4-hour iaboratc ureuiu ^ 









, , out lecture 

changed* 3 - 

• the proposed change tue saie 
tf t ' living toe ssae total sours bo 

*Sf 6 cr' to <*"*«* received only 4 

.t?i£ for I rorbli of effort. This proposal caa oeen 

'- ;,,L ™r *he iC ' Horticalture Co. of 

%& - ™te of Heads of Departments 

of 

, ■, ■■\ **?& ■ irv Cattle Productions - This 

i^ see* the solution 

tl: £«ic ; riti< agerial problems 

com: a successful dairjinj 

., r ->< 2-hour laborato: nod i,reoi.b ,-> 

jtore, 66, Wood Anatomy and. Identification, - >restry 25» 

Voce'. Anatomy an entification. 

■j.. ■- ' ?y 71. 
>restry 52 < -*• 

' Aerial Photo 

Siectrical Engineering 91 from first semester to second wife 
change in number and write-up 

e^r-e alt^fco; . system proportional, derivative, and 

Sn? d rsj transient behavior on d ^^ "^^ 
corrective lethods; criteria for eatisfactoiy ooewtaonj practical 

electrical an.:, mechanical systems, j 

3 Cl*.ss hours; 1 3-hour laboratory period -, rptf- 

Prerecuisite, Electrical Engineering 57 or Mecnanxea, ^^ 

nuivrv m«H a fro.n second to first sa.iei;ter« -with 

CH, L , 38 in nalber an , wr,^~ 



CHAJ 



CHAUGE 






l? V- 87 62 

Po^er 

Prere te, Electric* 
-Z Electrical neerj A c - 



nm 



CHANGE 



S* £• 78 SPECIAL PP0,7£CTS* A laboratory course, associated 
with a selected technical elective (ae approved by the stu- 
dent's major advisor) r in which the student carries out a 
study or project of particular interest to himself $ vith a 
minimum of supervision* and wherein he is expected to learn 
to do independent wox&* A written report is required at the 
conclusion of the project. 
1 3-hour laboratory period per week* 
Prerequisite, suitable technical elective concurrently. Credit 1 

Psychology 92* That clinical Psychology be given as two one- 
hour lecture periods plus one two-hour laboratory instead of 
the three one-hour lecture oeriods as at ©resent. 



new 



Speech 6.2 ADV&KCED RADIO PRODUCTION* An advanced course in 

broadcasting to provide practice in preparing and producing 

radio talks, radio pl&ys and documentary programs* 

2 clas3 hours 1 2-hour laboratory 

Prerequisite Speech 61. Credit 3 



It was 



VOT 



To approve the proposed curriculum in the Ma^or for 
Physical Education for Men with the understanding 
that the proposed electives in the schedule be used 
for courses outside the Division of Physical Education. 



Physical 

Education 

Courses 



It was 



V02J2)f To approve the attached new program for nursesi 



It was 



Nursing 
Program 



VQT££i? To approve the following new graduate courses in 
Sociology j 



New Graduate 
Courses 



new 



Sociology 200 SPECIAL PROBLEM* ~ A special project in 
Sociology which may serve in lieu of thesis* 
Prerequisite Sociology 179, or equivalent. 



Credit 3-6 



NSW 



Sociology 298» IKTSKBSHIP. - Supervised training and practice 
in the administration of a state correctional Institution, or 
organization, students chosen for this training will serve 
with one of the following: Women's Reformatory (Framin.ghaa) # 
Men's Reforoatory (Concord), The Bureau of Classification (De- 
partment of Correction), Youth Service Board {Department of 
Correction), The United Prison Association (Boston). A mini- 
mum of three months (40-hour weeks) is required and will nomally 
take place the summer following completion of the major part of 
the student' s course work. 
Prerequisites Sociology 176, 214, 217. Credit 3 



- 

: 

- - 






in .1 

, 3 

Pr 






- 



Pre 



1. Ita&Ljyj&S&L* Professor and H«ad of Music, for on© year Sabbatical 

at half pay beginning September 1, 1954 to complete vosfc Leaves 

on doctorate* 



o 



&&UuJ&tiZ&££L Professor of Landscape Architecture, 
for one semester at full pay beginning September 1* 1954 
to visit leading nurseries of the Unltod States for the 
purpose of observing management and cultural practices as 
a basis for preparing a publication en the nursery Uisinees, 

3, Isr^iiui^^MirlL^.^ Professor of floriculture at the 
Valthem Field Station, for one semester at full pay be- 
ginning in February of 1955 to complete work for the Ph*D. 
degree, 

4« l££m$iJkJa£M£j Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering, 
for one year at half pay beginning September 1, 1954. to com- 
plete doctor 6 s degree* 

5« S&a&teJk £ook« Assistant Professor of Home Economics , for one 
semester at full pay beginning February 1955 to study at the 
Harvard School of Public Health in Nutrition &nd Maternal and 

Child Healths 

i&mJuLBS&l&j Assistant Professor of History, for one 
semester at full pay beginning February of 1955 to complete 
dissertation for the doctor's degree* 



t»' 



?• !$M&M^&J*M£&L9 Professor of Business Administration, for one 
semester at full pay beginning September 1, 1954- to bring 
doctoral thesis up to date and prepare it for' publication* 

8. 2t)^mxl^^lS^2^&mLf H « ad °* Department of Botany, for one 
semester at full pay beginning September 1, 1954 £or advanced 
study in plant physiology « 

9. Hi&er-iL- ikrkus.on « Associate Professor of Agricultural Engi- 
neering, for one semester at full pay beginning February of 
1955 to visit various schools and research centers in archi- 
tecture and engineering throughout the country for study. 

10. QImM^J^Jb^ Hea <* ©* "^he Department of Psychology, for one 

semester at full pay beginning February of 1955 for research 
and study in the field of experimental abnormal behavior, 

- 1, ' JSTJ^ilLJ^M^ab Assistant. professor of Agricultural Economics, 
for one semester at full pay beginning February of 1955 to work 
on doctor's degree at &ortfa Carolina Stat* College. 

12» $MS&^A^M^S9Qty Associate Professor of Physiology, for one 
semester at full pay beginning February of 1955 for study at 
the Jefferson Medical School in Philadelphia* 



forrlcvto 






safety methc 
can Had Cror- 
yck hoursc. 

) SKILLS AND 
of teaching and organising 
ball® 
60 clock hours « 



36 (II) SKILLS AND TECHNIQUES, 
techniques of teaching elementary aj 
structton of elementary gymnast!* 
60 clock hours 9 

(I) SKILIS AND TECHNKT 
teaching golf and badmint< 
60 clock hours © 






id i 

Hey- 



**9 



traction in 
pyramids 9 con< 

Credit, 



r»_9_ -: 



ILLS AND TEC! 
response basic to element- 
snd parti cists'. Tarieus 1 



83 



aND T 

niques of t>. tennis a?' 

vek hours o 

81 n) SKH 
sor 
within class. 
60 clock horn 






P,E a 21 ( -TI0N 

education^ fundamental concepts * 
and professional c it +& 






£5 1* UOB - 



P„E„ 22 (H) FIRST AD) AND SAPETTo - Material* «H 
lata care of the injured, causae of accidents and procei 
deSleThabits ani attitude, leadtag to rtMmL* **?£££?* 
practices. Certified by American Red Cross for First Aid Instructor^ 



BBWKi a 



• 

of maintaining and improving indj 
lated to planning instruction en 
resources in health education^, ei 

P C E Ul (I) HUMAN ANATOMY 
of the human body 

PoEo hZ« (II) KIHESIOI0GT 
cation basic to a thorough under 

skills o 

Prerequisite FJSolil 

P*E« U3« OFFICIATING, 
ball and soccer © 

PoEo 104. (11) OFFICIATING 
basketball and baseba.! 

PoE. £3* (I) HiTSICAL EDT3 
tires of modern materials and me 
ties « dance relays* stunts and 3 



p,$l VA m*w5 



idy of t 






I0N« - Principles 
fundamentals re** 
school levels 

Credit ^ 2 * 



rad func 
Credit 



» A ©4 



■ V ItaHftV S V* ?"» 



iiiliUSLA | 



«. v wjmw a 



1 appli« 



and py'.i/. 



ods of teaching group gas 
A^xo games for the elemen 



lating f oot« 
Credit $ lo 

ciating 
Credits lo 



•hythmie aetivi« 
school o 

Credit , 3e 



PoEo 5Uo (n 
methods of teaching 
tiresp content mater 






lodern 



iec« 



P Eu 5- 
leme and procedures 3 #si 
schedules^ class! » af 
construction and meintenr 
door play areas,. 

Pol 

activities^ games 
limitations of students % 
ted participati 

program o 

Prert , 

P.« 

analysis oi 

and defense* tea 



:-'■■'■'■ '*-'«'!': 



PoEo 60 (H) OHM 
history and philosophy c 
safety,; modem trends, t 

' p 9 E 70 (H) RESC 
areas, recreational ree< 
recreation? competitors 
state, and local recreal 

PeEo ?lo (I) 72. 
discussion of research i 



Contemporary interpretations end 
organisation of material 
policies and program const 

P S E 8 'HSTS AND J 

of measurement in physical 
butions in anthropometrics fe strei 
die® functional tests, neuroHKUsi 
and it includes the tools of meai 
of test administration a 

p.Eo 7** (x) fhxsioixxjt o: 

concepts to the program of pbgrsi 
effects and adjustments aec 
factors in diet, condition! 
Prerequisite hZ 

driver education and d 
to orient the stud* 
streets and highway 
end driver trainings 

P©Eo OXo 

of, and instruc ine 
defense, teaching techniques 
que in fundamental skills 

personal a 
medical email* 
equipmer 

Prer* o 



Physical Education Major 



Freshman Tear 



1st Semester 



Credits 



English I 2 

Speech 3 * 

P.E. 31, Principles of Health Ed 3 



Psych* 26 General Psychology 
P.E. 21, Intro, to Phys. Ed. 
Military I 
P.E. 5, Skills and Techniques 

Elect one 
Chemistry I 
Botany I 
Zoology I 



3 
3 
3 
1 

3 

3 

3 

TT 



2nd Semester 

English II 

Speech U 

Government 25 American Government 

Mathematics 12 or lU 

P.E. 22, First Aid and Safety 

Military 2 

P.E. 6, Skills and Techniques 

Elect one 
Chemistry H 
Botany I 
Zoology I 



Sophomore Year 



English 2$ 

Bacteriology 31 

P.E. 111, Anatomy 

Economics 25 or Sociology 28 

P,E. 3$, Skills and Techniques 

Military 25 

Electives 



3 
k 
3 
3 

1 
2 
3 



English 26 

Zoology 35, Physiology 

P.E. U2, Kinesiology 

Psychology 56, Educ. Psychology 

P.E, 36, Skills and Techniques 

Military 26 

Electives 



Credits 

2 
1 
3 
3 
3 
2 
1 

3 
3 
3 



3 

3 
3 
3 
1 
2 
3 



Junior Tear 



Ed. 83, Principles of Second.Ed. 3 

P.E. 53, Phys * Ed. Elem. Schools 3 
P.E, 55, Org, and Adm. of Phys.Ed.3 

P.E. 57, Meth. and Mat. Coaching 3 

(Football-Basketball) 

P.E. 63, Skills and Techniques 1 

Electives 6 



Ed. 52, Prin. and Methods of Teach. 
P.E, 5U, Phys. Ed. Second. Schools 
P.E. 56, Adaptive Phys. Ed. 
Psych. 9ht Child Psychology 
P.E. 58, Meth. and Mat. Coaching 

(Swimming-Baseball) 
P.E. 61;, Skills and Techniques 
Electives 



Senior Tear 



Ed. 85j Practice Teaching 

P.E. 73, Pbil.&Princ.of Phys.Ed 

Speech 91, Extempore Speech 



3 
3 
3 



Rec. Ed. 77, Org. &Adm. of Comm.Rec. 3 
P.E. 81, Meth. & Mat. Coaching 3 

(Soccer-Track) 
P.E. 83, Skills and Techniques 
Electives 



Education 85, Practice Teaching 
Ed. 6U, Princ. of Elem. Education 
P.E. 72* , Tests and Meas. in Phys, Ed. 
P.E. 76, Physiology of Exercise 
P.E S 8U, Skills and Techniques 
Electives 



1 

T5~ 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



-& 



3 

3 
3 
3 
1 
6 



\ 



UNIV3It3irr OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Purpose of the Basic Collegiate Nursing Program 

The basic professional nursing program is designed for quali- 
fied high school graduate* who are interested in preparing themselves 
for a way of life a* professional nurses which may be expressed 
through service to the individual, the family and to the community 

The four calendar year program plus B weeks (total 216 weeks) 
aims to provide its graduates with the basic understandings, appre- 
ciations, skills and attitudes which are essential for a beginning 
professional nurse practitioner in the hospital and in the community; 
leadership in the hospital nursing teaai an increased competency as 
an active participant in the therapeutic and health teams* and 
cltisen participation, It further aims to provide the foundation 
for advancement to head nurse positions, graduate study in nursing, 
and candidacy for positions in teaching, supervision, administration, 
clinical specialities, consultation and research* 

The desired outcomes of the educational program are directed 
toward helping the student tcs 

-increase her self -understanding so that ©he may function 
constructively and creatively in her personal and pro- 
fessional relationships 

«. enhances and improve her emotional* physical, social and 
spiritual we 11 ~b sing 

^extend her understanding ef the health needs of the J Kdi ; 
vldual and the family and community organisations primarily 
concerned with the promotion of health and prevention of 
illness 

-improve her professional competency as she ministers to 
the individual and the family in * selected clinical 
situation 

-more fully understand and appreciate her role in the 
nursing care, the therapeutic and the health team* 

-become sensitive to the need of and responsibility for 
periodic appraisal and improvement of professional nurs- 
ing practice 



«r 2 "» 

^enable her to become a more self -directive and responsible 
member of tha profession and of the community 

^improv® he:? professional competency through continued 
study^ 

The first four academic semesters at the University enable the 
student to gain an educational foundation upon which to develop ths 
more specialised portion of the program in nursing* The summer 
following the second academic semester is free* During the 141 
weeks (including 16 weaks vacation) which follow tha fourth academic 
semester, the professional courses (including instruction and 
correlated clinical experience) are given In selected cooperating 
hospitals and community agencies by the nursing faculty of the 
University School of Nursing and the allied professional staffs of 
the cooperating agencies 9 Following the clinical portion of the 
program, the student returns to the University for a fifth academic 
semester and is granted a Bachelor of S?j?ienee degree in June* Upon 
the satisfactory eeupletlost of the State Board Examinations, the 
candidate receives legal status as a Registered Nurse (R*H») 



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Nursj.ng rrogr&6& 

Program Sequence 



ire .■ademie t Semes to Jul Jk££as 

■■iglis: tiglish Composition 4 

-eech Speech 

^emistry 1 & ■ eneral Chemistry 6 

oology Introductory Zoology 3 

Vertebrate Physiology 

ihemat. 12 Functional Mathematics 

tstory Modern European Civilisatio 3 

Soeioleg Introduction to Sociology 

Psychology 26 General Psychology 3 

hJUpdAndPow rt h _ Acj^emlQ S erne stars ( S e pt „ to June ) 



English 25 Humane Letters 

Chemis 33 Organic Cheaist-ry 4 

Sociology 53 Intro, to Cultural Anthropology 3 

>yehologv Educational Psychology 'X 

Horn® Economic* 41 Pood* and Nutrition 4 

42 Medical Dietetics 2 
icterio Introductory Bacteriology 
'i-iilosophy '65 Ethics 

Horn® Eeo&s;: 70 Child Development 3 

Nursing Orientation to Nursing 4 

st Cliniea' 'lodf Juti€i to June (34 day© vacatio*? 

Fundamentals of Nursing 
scial a 1 .eal Foundations .ig 
•idisal and Surgical Nursing 1 
ing o .-ildren 1 

":.rsing 4 

nd C Jun« to June (30 &&y& vacatio 



ychia -' r sing 

-bercul- Nursing 

rnit3 sing 

irsini iiildr©n II 

Nursing 
-ileal and Surgical Nursing 

Linie ?erioi a to February ?th (39 days ^acati 

•al ai 1 Nursing 13 (coi Z 

1 Nursing 

■rgic : 

S* ..ship 4 






fth Academic Semester (February to June ) 



English 26 Humane Letters 

History 6 Modern European Civilisation 

Senior Nursing Seminar 

Slectives (academic) 



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St© :T 5 & 6 

Psychology 26 

j£y 2$ 
53 



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Eur., Civ* 



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Gw B Psychology 
Intro* Sociology 
Anthropoid 

Psychology 



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Vertebrate Ph y 8 1 o 1 ,-, 

2 

31 gy 



Sciences J {1. 

F lal Hath 

45. a & Nutrition 
Mcc Uiet sties 

Ec 70 t.h & Devel* 









3 
3 



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70 



Orientation to Nur& 
Fundament ale of Mux- 
Social & Hist al 

Foundaii 
Medical and Surgical 

Nursing 
Medical and Surgical 

Nursing IX 
Psychiatric Nursing 
Maternity 

Nursing of Children 
Tuberculos. ursin 
Public H< *sing 

am N' 

vanced "d 

-rgleal 
ilor El .y® 

nteroshlj 



90 






iU 



315 



90 








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12 


D40 




120! 


12 


1360 




10 


12 


360 




135 1 


14 ' 


&20 




90 1 




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4 


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?-40 



7 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



I 



School of Nursing 

Desc ripti o n and Segue nog of 

Nursing Courses 



i, 26 (II) Orientation to Nursing 

An Introductory course in nursing* 

Unit I - is designed to familiarise the beginning student 

with the scope of professional nursing in the community 

and in the hospital* and th© privilege© and responsibilities 

of one who has chosen nursing as a profession.. 

Unit II - provides an opportunity for the student to gain 

a foundation upon which to build th® subsequent nursing 

courses « Emphasis is placed upon the development of 

interpersonal skills and the principles and methods of 

teaching la nursing* 



4th academic semester 



4 credits 
Th® Nursing Division 



Nurso S 27 (3) Fundamentals of Nursing 

The basic cours© in nursing practice© 
It is designed as a foundation course for subsequent 
clinical nursing courses Beginning with a consideration 
of th® basic needs of patients in general, the student 
is guided^, through a case study approach* to become 
increasingly able to identify th® particular needs of 
selected patients 9 and to design an individualised 
nursing ear© plan<v Emphasis is placed on the understand- 
ing of th© scientific principles of the nursing procedure* 
the acquisition of manipulative skills, the significance 
of nurse~patient relationships^ individualised patient 
teachings and th© unioue role of the nurse in the thera- 
peutic plan* 

Direct nursing care of selected patients on th® medical 
and surgical units will be an integral part of this course a 



Summsr following 4th 
academic semestor 
10 hours per week of 
clinical practice for 

9 weak So 



9 credits 
Miss Mary Gilmore and 
Assistants 



Nurs 



\ 



S 28 (S) Social and Historic al Foundat ions of Nursing 

A survey course of nursing from the pre-Christian era 

to tho present* The influence of society upon nursing 

in the various historical periods will serve to familiarize 

the student with the development of nursing as a professions 

2 credits 
Miss Mary A* Maher 



<«> 2 



iTi 



51 



I 



.,52 



•A 



Nurs«£» 



I 



(I) «.<Hfi» l and Surgica l MuralngJL . BM 

familiar with the major hsalth problem of th. coaamnity 
as reflected by the adults receiving care on. the 
Mdie.1 and •nrgleal unit., and to »cq«l" the 

apeclalised nursing * wllti "» •■"?"?!,*! '.^"tha 
eoaprahansiva nursing care. The significance of the 
individual'* total response to threats of living as 
rSfllcta. in illness, the relationship, af pr £•■*£» 
Ind ..rly detection and medi cal » ••»»•• *?,£!**' 
rehabilitation and .prognosis will b ?. • n P^f*!*„|. al 
Pertinent course content regarding the Pathological 
findings nutrition in illness, the P"*-**"?^ 1 " 1 ^. 
and spiral therapies are pra.antad in *•£•"« £ *£ 
health problems und« o*»U*»tloBtti the P«J*x««UX ( 

needs 



patients in various age groups *n& different «wi. 



28 weeks of correlated 
clinical nursing practice 
in th© 45&P® of selected 
patients on the Medical 
and Surgical Units and 
in the Out-Patient Service* 
i weeksr Operating Boom 



16- credits 

Mis* Mary Glim© re and 
Assistants 

Medical and allied 
Professional staffs of 
th® Hoanital 



Therapeutic Diet Practice. 

the persistent behaviour patterns of children which 

•nhanea or impede ~ "™** ®**"f ^ dl8C11 ..ioa. the 
Through ease studies, conferences ana « lbl! """" 4 . 
student will be halpad to understand ■«•*»"* r^ lt , 
child's behaviour and to consider family and community 
responsibility for praranting motional disturbances 



2 weeks clinical 
experience with 

young children 



2 credits 
Instructors in Pediatric 

and Psychiatric Nursing 



ffiff^^SSS^ and discussion of the dynamics 
of 2n behaviour, th. content of the eourso is extend ed 
to include the fundamentals of psychopathology related 
to the basic origin of conflict in patient.. The 
specialised abilities zn& skills of the «*"••**£?" 
vidin* care to the mentally ill patient are presented 
li o"dov that the understanding of the patient* behaviour 
will lead to a constructive nurse-patient relationship 
"thoroby enabling the students to Pfrtieipata more i^liy 
in the therapeutic plav The relationship of. *^.ecteci 
patient -s behaviour pathology to early manifestations 
of behaviour deviation, early diagnosis, treatments, 
rehabilitation and prevention will be discussed in case 
conferences. Community planning resources and responsi- 
bility in regard to this major health problem will be 
explored , 



3 



rs 



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52~B 



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12 weeks clinical 
experience with care 
of selected patients 
in a Psyehiatrle 
Hospital 



Instructor 
Kuraing 



6 credits 

in Psychiatric 



Medical and allied 
Professional staffs of the 
Hospitals 



Tuber eulojsjj^Jittrsii^ 

the principles and practice of nursing tha patient with 
tuberculosis will be utilised as a basis for extending 
the students * knowledge of tuberculosis; its significance 
as a major health problem^ the special needs of patients 
with long-term illnesses and the epidemological aspects 
of communicable diseases* Clinical experience in the 
car® of selected patients will be combined with clinics* 
conferences and group discussion* 



6 weeks clinical experi< 
once In the care of 

selected patient* with 
Tuberculosis » 



3 credits 

Xnstriietor to be announced 

Medical and allied Pre~ 
fessional staffs of th® 

Hospital 



(I) Maternity Nursing, 

The course content is developed around the meaning or 
pregnancy to the patient and the family with special 
emphasis on the understanding of the mother* a phycl©« 

logical and psychological needs before^ during and 
after the birth of the infant. The specialised abilities 
of the nurse are taught in relation to an understanding 
of the phenomena of pregnancy* the birth process* immediate 
car® of the mother and infant* newborn care, the impor~ 
tance for early constructive mother^ehild relationship 
and patient teaching* 



12 weeks clinical 
practice including 
prenatal clinie* labor 
and birth room a newborn 
and premature nurseries, 
post «- part al units 
clinics « 



5 credits 
Maternity Nursing Instruct 
tor to be announced 

Medical and allied Pro- 
fessional staffs of 
the Maternity Hospital 



(*D 3grs u |n i E^,Ch,lldren II 

The physical* educational, social and spiritual needs 
of the child in health are reviewed as a basis for under- 
standing the child who is acutely illj the child whose 
hospital experience is extended over a period of time^ 
and the child displaying evidences? of emotional stress 
Basic principles of the care of children with special 
needs are taught concurrently with the clinical experience 



12 weeks clinical 
experience in the 
care of seleoted 
children - 



5 credits 
Medical and Professional 
staffs of cooperating 
Hospitals and Agencies 

Pediatric Nursing Xnstruc 
tor to be announced 



4 



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C 1 *) Public Heal th Nursine 

An introduction to the role of the public health nurse in 
a family health service* Through a study of an experience 
with selected families the student will be helped to 

acquire an understanding of abilities essential for 

public health nursing practice.. 



B weeks field 
experience with 
selected families 



3 credits 

Miss Maher and Sduea< 
tional Directors of 
Cooperating Agencies 



gMl&il^and^^ 

Instruction and clinical practice in the nursing care of 
patients admitted to the gynecological, urological^ 
neurological^ ear, ©ye* nose and throaty dematologleal 

outpatient and emergency services 



d weeks clinical 
practice in the care 
of selected patients 
in the &bove services 



5 credit® 
Hiss Mary Gilmer* and 
Assistants 

Medical and allied Pro- 
fessional staffs of the 

Hospital 



kffurs,S 61 



Team Nursing 

rnrmnrrnr in T i" 1 n i h imi h i mi m Hi i 

The purpoae^ organisation and functioning of the nursing 
team in the ward units will be presented* Emphasis will 
be placed on the privileges &n& responsibilities of the 
tea®, leader &n& team members in providing nursing care 

to patients* 



4 weeks clinical 

@xp©ri®nee 



2 credits 
The Nursing Division 



(*) MllS^^JlSlIcA^ &«<* Surgical Nursing 

Nursing care of selected patients with major health pro< 

blem© who require extensive medical and/or surgical 

therapy and nursing care., 



8 weeks 

clinical experience 



3 credits 
Miss Mary Gilmore and 
Assistants 



I 



Medical and Professional 
staff members of the Hos* 
pital 



Nurso 6£ (I) 



£&3i&Lli&&y s J& (Internship) Public Health Nursing Service 



or 



^lMor_^e^lvg_(Inter^3hip) Psychiatric Nursing 



or 



XVERi 

SCHOOL 0? NURSING 



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30 















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UNIVERSITY OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 



Qommencement 
1954 



\ 



1863 - Ninety-first Year - 1954 



1781 



Master of 
Arts in 
Teaching 

Emeritus 
Professors 

Lorin E. Ball 

Frederick A. 
McLaughlin 

Ray M. Koon 



Robert E. Young 
Promotion of 



Fred P. Jeffrey 
appointment 



GRADUATION EXERCISES 



Eighty- Fourth 
Commencement 




LIBRARY LAWN 

(In case of rain the exercises will be held in the Curry S. Hicks 
Physical Education Building) 

Sunday, June 6, 1954, at 3:30 P. M. 



1781 



Master of 
Arts in 
Teaching 

Emeritus 
Professors 

Lorin E. Ball 

Frederick A. 
McLaughlin 

Ray M. Koon 



Robert E. Young 
Promotion of 



Fred P. Jeffrey 
appointment 



'Program 



PROCESSIONAL 



INVOCATION 

THE REVEREND SYDNEY TEMPLE, Ph.D. 
Chaplain to Protestant Students 
at the University of Massachusetts 



ADDRESS 



LEONARD CARMICHAEL, Ph.D., Litt.D. 

Secretary, Smithsonian Institution 



CONFERRING OF DEGREES 

PRESIDENT JEAN PAUL MATHER, M.A.B., M.A. 

RECESSIONAL 

Organist: DORIC ALVIANI, Professor of Music 



(The audience is requested to remain standing 
while the academic procession withdraws) 



1781 



Master of 
Arts in 
Teaching 

Emeritus 
Professors 

Lorin E. Ball 

Frederick A. 
McLaughlin 

Ray M. Koon 



Robert E. Young 
Promotion of 



Fred P. Jeffrey- 
appointment 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCE 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF ARTS 



Summa Cum Laude 
Stephanie Holmes 



Magna Cum Laude 



Jeanette Nelson Akers 
Barbara Jean Bartholomew 
George DeMello 
Marion Jane Felton 
Constance Gilman 



Frances Louise Jones 
Marta Mapes 
Joan Gertrude McAlevey 
Pauline Hill Stephan 
Paula Tattlebaum 



Cum Laude 



Samuel Paul Brenner 
Erma Eardley DeBoer 
Nancy Ruth Drexel 
Marcelle Mackba 
Jeannot Brothers Heyman 
Helen Catherine Keefe 
Claire Marie Macdonald 
Wayne Wilfred Marcotte 



Carolyn Cushing Alger 
Richard Carl Andrews 
Helen-Lou Atkinson 
Ralph Edward Barrows 
Suzanne Vest Baumann 
Barbara Louise Bayon 
Elaine Grace Beiman 
Herbert Elliot Belkin 
Arthur Asa Berger 
Loretta M. Berube 



Rite 



Shirley Mitchell Moser 
Mildred Irene Nyberg 
Edward Joseph O'Day, Jr. 
Joan Marie Perrino 
Janet May Robinson 
Elinor Margaret Tete 
Barbara Ann Underhill 



John Joseph Bevilaqua, Jr. 
Regina Veronica Bianchi 
Barbara Ruth Binsky 
Meredith Clinton Bissell 
Jane Eleanor Blackwell 
Joan Morton Bonney 
David S. Bovarnick 
Eugene Francis Bragiel 
Janet Katherine Brox 



( 



Clement Leonard Burlingame 

Ruth Evelyn Burns 

Edmond Charles Campbell, Jr. 

Janice Eaton Carey 

Raelene Sylvia Carey 

Ann Margaret Cavanagh 

Gladys Ann Chandler 

David Thomas Chapla 

Ethel Marie Clancey 

Mary Bernadette Clark 

Frances Mary Conroy 

Jane Ann Crepeau 

Mary Catherine Cronin 
*Mary J. Crudden 

Phyllis Davenport 

John Francis Davis 

Stephen Davis 

Robert Howard Deans 

Lois M. Dennis 

James Joseph Devaney 

John Joseph Dillon 

William Glenden Dunn, Jr. 

Annette Marie Early 

Ann Claire English 

Abigale Justine Ferry 

Edward Armand Filiault 

Lois Frances Finnick 

Jean Frances Flaherty 

Walter Spear Foster 

Bruce R. Fox 

Anne Margaret Freeman 

Gertrude Edna Gates 

Patricia Anne Gay 
*Marvin Harold Glaser 

Marion Joyce Glidden 

Laurel Linnet Globus 

Janet Gertrude Gomez 

Sherman Peter Gorshel 

Paul Fletcher Green 

Marino Joseph Grimaldi 

Joseph Eugene Guarnotta 

Norma Gurwitz 



*As of Class of 1953 .■ 
**As of Class of 1951 



Randolph Basil Guyette 
Thomas Etney Hardy 
Theodore Lincoln Hargrove 
Virginia Harper 
Nancy Pond Hastings 
Dorothy Marie Hefferan 
John Peter Heintz 
Stephen Abbott Hopkins 
Henry Louis Houde 
Hubert Farnham Howson 
Paula Hunt 

Richard Maurice Hutchins 
Janet Sylvia Ireland 
James Arthur Jack 
Nancy Ann Jacobson 
William Mathew Karlyn 
Jane Carolyn Katz 
Jean Ann Kearns 
Ann Marie Kelly 
Martha Richardson Kimball 
Prescott Allan Kimball 
Robert Gerson Kline 
John Arthur Kreiger 
Diana Krikorian 
Stephen Theodore Lapton, Jr. 
** Wilfred Hill Learned, Jr. 
Addison David Lesser 
Joyce Marie LeVangie 
Thomas Donald Lewis 
Lorraine Rose Lively 
Elizabeth Ann Lupien 
Ann Marie Lynch 
Robert Kerwin MacLauchlin 
Patricia Margaret Mansfield 
Judith Alden Martin 
Mary Jane McCarthy 
Cornelius Bradley McGrath 
Francis Patrick Mclnerney 
Reed Trinder Mellor 
Barbara Ann Mennard 
John Preston Miller 
Nancy Jean Montgomery 



1781 



Master of 
Arts in 
Teaching 

Bneritus 
Professors 

Lorin E. Ball 

Frederick A. 
McLaughlin 

Ray M. Koon 



Robert E. Young 
Promotion of 



Fred P. Jeffrey 
appointment 



Merna Marcia Morgenstein 

Mary Lou Moriarty 

Barbara Ann Mullins 
*Robert William Mulvaney 

Jean Marie Murdock 

Bessiemae Nava 

Edith Anna Oleson 

Owen Richard O'Neil 

Barbara Sue Padden 

Kathleen Patch 

Donald Alan Pearse 

John Garrett Penn 

Joanne Marie Petersen 

Margaret Elizabeth Phaneuf 

Christine Platsis 

William Morgan Potts 

Louise Anne Pride 

Joan Ailene Redman 
*Marvin Jacob Reeber 

Phyllis Robinson 

Walter Linville Rudy 

Barbara Ann Ryan 

Phyllis Anne Salvini 

Marie Elizabeth Saunders 
*Marvin Samuel Schindler 

Hermia Irvina Seidman 

Mary Ann Shea 

Barbara Patricia Short 



Audrey Suvalle Shuman 
Allen Lesley Shumway, Jr. 
Joyce Annetta Silva 
Paul John Sobala 
James Theodore Stamatopulos 
*Diane Marcia Sterman 
Ruth Barbara Stiles 
Robert Edward Stocki 
Evelyn A. Stone 
Richard Leonard Stromgren 
Edward Dennis Sullivan 
Edward Alfred Swenson 
David Frederic Tatham 
Joan Gustafson Theriault 
Jean Ann Tonks 
Barbara Ann Waddington 
Richard Royce Waite 
Marcia Warren 
Jean Sargent Waterhouse 
Peter James Webber 
Jean Kathryn Whitten 
Alayne Judith Wood 
Elizabeth Morgan Wood 
Elisabeth Ann Woodman 
Betty Moulton Woodward 
Joan Margaret Wrightson 
Barbara Kathleen Young 
Rita Jean Marie Zarrella 



r 



*As of Class of 1953 



f 

I 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 



Summa Cum Laude 
Donald Westwood Barr 



Margot Lois Bushey 
Helen Margaret Donega 
Claire Phyllis Ducharme 



Magna Cum Laude 



Michael Robert Stelluto 



Cum Laude 



Richard Bernard Hanrahan 
Constance Louise Peterson 
Jane Carolyn Roberts 



Joseph Arthur Bogni 
Louise Roberta Elliot 
Robert Edward Hartwell 
Carol Lorraine Holt 



Allen Oscar Warner 



Rite 



Anna Rita Katz 
Elizabeth Ann McCarthy 
Bernard Anthony Murray 
Dorothy Jamrok Rohan 



Shirley Jeanne Adams 
Ruth Ann Allaire 
Phyllis Lucienne Andersen 
Walter Alfred Anderson 
Leonard Antiles 
Lawrence Robert Ash 
Arlene Faye Baer 
Marvin Arthur Bass 
Brian Paul Bertrand 
*Donald Martin Black 
Raymond Forrest Blackmer 
Victor Martin Breene 
Marguerite Ann Brown 
Michael Daniel Byer 
Donald John Cheater 
Jonathan Chua 



Harold L. Cogan 
Richard John Costello 
Patricia Elizabeth Daignault 
Robert Warren DeLand 
*John Joseph Dent 
Richard John DeSando 
Francis Vincent Donovan, Jr. 
Ronald John Drago 
William Eugene Dudek 
Francis Anthony DuVernois 
Faith Egley 

Theresa Mary-Rose Ennis 
Francis John Farrell 
Peter Figgie 
James Joseph Fleming 



1781 



Master of 
Arts in 
Teaching 

Emeritus 
Professors 

Lorin E. Ball 

Frederick A. 
McLaughlin 

Ray M. Koon 



Robert E. Young 
Promotion of 



*As of Class of 1953 



Fred P. Jeffrey- 
appointment 



Barbara Joan Gates 
Dorothy Joan Gerson 
Robert Barry Gibbons 
Mary Lou Glynn 
Morton Harold Goldberg 
Anita Lee Goretsky 
Nicholas Martin Gralenski 

*Richard Pomeroy Hamilton 
Basdio Henriques, Jr. 
Karl Meek Hergenrother 
Barbara Ann Herzog 
John Paul Hughes 
Wesley Dale Humphriss 
Joseph Salvatore Jennette 
Morgan Edward Jennings, Jr. 
Norma Louise Jewell 
Herbert Marcus Kagan 
Alvin Joshua Karloff 
Edward G. Kee 
Dorothy Ann Kelleher 
John Peter Kirchner 
John Douglas Knapton 
Carlton Smith Koehler 

*Donald Elbridge Kuhn 
Joan Ann LaPinsky 
Francis Mario LaPosta 
Raymond Albert Letourneau 
Henry Edward Luippold 
George Marr, Jr. 
Dudley Russel Marsh 
Herbert Verner Marsh, Jr. 
Lawrence Edward McAllister 
Edward Robert McLaughlin 



E. Jean McLellan 
Richard Erland Mortberg 
Nancy Jean Motte 
John Joseph O'Donnell, Jr. 
Joseph Paul O'Hare 
Anthony Pacheco 
John Edward Papp 
Richard Sheldon Patterson 
Frank Stevens Perrin 
Robert Arthur Phdlips 
Joseph Leonard Pignatiello 
Richard Donald Poirier 
Robert Pollack 
Helen Marie Praetz 
Arwei*t"*rerg uson 1 ivuiotj^^ 
Akmaad^Gordon ' Prioo 
Paul Ingham Puddington 
Paul Roswell Raymond 
Robert Harper Russell 
Dorothy Alice Sazama 
Donald George Shaw 
Nathan Reid Shaw 
Chester Louis Smola 
Sophia Sowyrda 
Roland Frederick Stebbins 
Virginia Marie Stewart 
Ruth Joan Sukackas 
Jack Tatirosian 
Pauline Elizabeth Turner 
Clinton Earl Watson 
Carolyn Frances Weeks 
Martha Edith Wilson 
David Wayne Yesair 



*As of Class of 1953 



( 



SCHOOL OF 
AGRICULTURE AND HORTICULTURE 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 



Roger Joseph Bartels 



Gwendolyn Hazel Judson 



Pio Angelini 
Robert Denis Arsenault 
Joan Lou Arthur 
Gerry Curtis Atwell 
William Makepeace Atwood 
Philip Matthew Aversano 
Andrew Arnold Ayers, Jr. 
Frank Dana Bartlett, Jr. 
Arthur Roland Batchelder 
Karakian Bedrosian 

*George Henry Bicknell, Jr. 
Donald Francis Blais 
David Eugene Blanchard 
Richard Edward Bonney 
Colton Hunt Bridges 
Dante Thomas Brunetti 
Leonard Sargent Campbell 
Thomas Hugo Carlson 
Anthony Gilmore Chambers 
Charles Edward Cook 
Edward Craig, Jr. 
Natalie Ann Crowell 
Donald Alan Dalrymple 
Milford Ernest Davis 
Paul Aime Decelle 
Howard Arnold Dennis 

*Allen Peirce Doe 



Magna Cum Laude 



Cum Laude 



*As of Class of 1953 



Rite 



Stephen William Fish 



Adolphus G. Meier 



1781 



Charles Wellington Dort 
Glenn Ross Dunphy 
Samuel Morrison Ellsworth 
Donald Smith Erickson 
Louis Falconieri 
Charles Feldberg 
Arthur Roy Fogelgren 
John Eugene Fortanas 
Donald Sherwood Francis 
Burton Samuel Friedman 
Fred LaVine Galloway 
Walter Sheldon Gifford, Jr. 
George Benjamin Goddard 
Sheldon Greenberg 
Carl William Haeseler 
Julius Hunting Hayward 
John Anthony Helein 
Robert William Henrickson 
David Royce Houston 
Betty Louise Howe 
William Craig Johnson 
Richard Alyn Jones 
David Morrison Jordan 
Reynold Thomas King 
Henry Adams Knapp 
Donald Raymond Lambert 
*Paul Herbert Langheld 



Master of 
Arts in 
Teaching 

Emeritus 
Professors 

Lorin E. Ball 

Frederick A. 
McLaughlin 

Ray M. Koon 



Robert E. Young 
Promotion of 



Fred P. Jeffrey 
appointment 



Robert Norman Latour 
Robert Harry Leaver 
Robert William L'Esperance 
Arthur Charles Lincoln, Jr. 
Duncan MacDonald 
Cyril Milton Merritt 
Vance Neily Morgan 
Benjamin William Nason 
Marilea Anne Papalia 
Joseph Richard Perrozzi 
Leonard Albert Pierce 
Joseph Albert Powers, Jr. 
Charles Edwin Redman, Jr. 
Herman Ronald Resnick 
William Ripley, III 
*Paul Hunt Robbins 
Morris Robert Rodman 



Robert Edwin Rosa 
Priscilla Christine Ruder 
Albert Rene St. Germain 
David Phillip Segal 
John Francis Skibiski 
Robert Douglas Smith 
Herbert Clark Stevens 
David Alden Storey 
Robert Bradford Tuttle 
Marcia Ann Viale 
George Thomas Warren 
James Robert Watts 
Kenneth Gould Weston 
Edwin Frederick White 
Joel Truman Whittemore 
Kenneth Frederick Wich, Jr. 
Edward Savage Wilson 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE 



George Oliveira Brasells 
William Hume Crowell 



George Lawrence McMullin 
Edwin Hollis Stiles 



*As of Class of 1953 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Summa Cum Laude 
Harry Enon Childs 

Cum Laude 
John Joseph Pasteris 



Rite 



Gerald Robert Appel 
Paul Lawrence Ayers, Jr. 
Herbert Ronald Bamel 
Russell John Barry 
Laurence Berlin 
Pearl Evelyn Binder 
Allan Joseph Bresnick 
Robert Aaron Brooks, Jr. 
James Francis Buckley 
Charles Joseph Burns, Jr. 

*Paul Edward Burns 
William Augustine Carroll 
Kenneth Kevin Casey 
Edward Edmund Conceison 
Avery Clayton Copeland 
Martin Francis Corcoran 
George Clarence Crooks 
Francis Joseph Daly 
Frank Edmund Davis, Jr. 
Leo Joseph Dugas 
Saul Frank Feingold 
Elliott Bernard Fishbein 
Edmund Daniel Flaherty 
Peter Henry Foley, Jr. 
Henry Napoleon Frenette, Jr. 
Arthur Geissler, Jr. 
Charles Patrick Gleason, Jr. 



Gerald Sumner Goldman 
Frank Farquhar Grandone 
Joseph Wolf Gurney 
Randall Bennett Haydon 
*George Herbert Howland 
Samuel Ernest Hurst, Jr. 
Edward Michael Kennedy 
John Leonard Kenney, Jr. 
Donald Young Knepper 
Bennett Lee Kramer 
Edward Michael Lally 
Edgar John Lesko 
Burton Richard Liebman 
Alfred P. Lovejoy, Jr. 
Harry Melvin Ludwig, Jr. 
William David Lynch 
John Vyn Marx 
William Walker McGowan, III 
Robert Philip McMahon 
Edgar John Mullins, Jr. 
John Whitmore Murray 
Edward Jones Parry, Jr. 
Joseph Lynwood Phelan 
Francis Anthony Podlesney 
Marvin Rosen 
James Dinsmore Ross 



*As of Class of 1953 



1781 



Master of 
Arts in 
Teaching 

Emeritus 
Professors 

Lorin E. Ball 

Frederick A. 
McLaughlin 

Ray M. Koon 



Robert E. Young 
Promotion of 



Fred P. Jeffrey 
appointment 



Gilbert Morton Slovin 
Harold Roger Soutier 
William Charles Spat 
William C. Stephens 
John Charles Stotz 
Oswald Charles Street 
Guy Gifford Stutzman 
William Aldrich Sweeney 
June B. Trull 
Robert Alan Venning 



Marcia Ellen Wakefield 
Nathaniel Saul Weiner 
William Ernest Wellette 
*Robert Emerson Wells, Jr. 
Duane Elmer Wheeler 
Marjorie Emma White 
Jane Wilkinson 
Martin Philip Wolf 
Richard Charles Woolf 
Bernard Leon Zulalian 



*As of Class of 1953 



( 



SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 



CANDIDATE FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Amnon Foux 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

Magna Cum Laude 
Donald William Bell 



Rite 



George Steven Buczala 
*Stanley Michael Dec 
James Petruzella 



Elbert Lawrence Richards 
Bernard Karl Saydlowski 
*John Luis Sniado 



Ronald Francis Tumeinski 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING 



Hugh Arthur Corr, Jr. 
Robert George Curran 
Frederick J. Dzialo 
Walter Gajewski 



Richard Edward Ganley 
Donald Brown George, Jr. 
Richard Linwood Miller 
Charles Francis Reeves 



Lionel Wolpert 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 



Francis Bacon Bailey 
Herbert Joseph Brandt 
Donald Raymond Cormier 
Randolph Whiting Englund 



*Elizabeth Anne Francis 
Edmund Joseph Galat 
Raymond Leslie Garnett 
Herbert Wallace Headle, Jr. 



1781 



Master of 
Arts in 
Teaching 

Emeritus 
Professors 

Lorin E. Ball 

Frederick A, 
McLaughlin 

Ray M. Koon 



*As of Class of 1953 



Robert E. Young 
Promotion of 



Fred P, Jeffrey 
appointment 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Donald George Audette Robert Arthur Heidrich 

*Charles Avedikian Robert Lincoln Hildebrandt, Jr. 

Edward Philip Beckwith *Andrew Francis Kwasnik, Jr. 

Richard Wendell Butler Colin Linton Moodie 

*Frederick Wheelock Chick Albin Raymond Palczynski, Jr. 

Alvin Richard Finkelstein *Bernard Ralph Romer 

John Kevin Flanagan Carmelo Joseph Scuderi 

Richard Lowell Golan *John Marion Suchocki 

Donald George Hall Peter C. Tappan 

Vincent G. Terry, Jr. 



*As of Class of 1953 



r 

I 



SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 



Magna Cum Laude 
Lila Broude 

Cum Laude 
Marilyn Bean Everett 



Rite 



Nancy Jane Allen 
Joyce Anne Arnold 
Mary- Judith Baird 
Helen Jean Baldwin 
Joyce Barnard 
Mary Eleanor Bates 
Patricia Marie Brewton 
Ann Marie Burrell 
Joan Jeffreys Crooks 
Shirley Mae Crooks 
Janet Danitis 
Jane Clare Davenport 
Ruth Sarah Davenport 
Susan Marie Dewar 
Nancy Clark Doe 
Louise Kathryn Donovan 
Susan Harriet Elliott 
Janet Marie Evensen 
Janet Marie Field 
Ruth Pauline Finkelstein 
Carolyn Claire Fiske 
Barbara Foster 
Patricia Pearle French 
Margaret Anne Garvey 
Elizabeth Caffery Gibb 
Katherine Esther Gibbs 
Mary-Louise Grentzenberg 



*As of Class of 1953 



Mary Louise Gulski 
Mary Jane Hartman 
Beverly Jane Hession 
Joan Elizabeth Kettell 
Shirley Barry Lacasse 
Rose Liner 
Mary Jane Lodge 
*Jeanne Myrick 
Eldine June Nylander 
Martha Okun 
Julia May Parmelee 
Joyce Alida Peck 
Abbie Isabelle Phelps 
Cynthia Morse Phippen 
Judith Serrill Rosnick 
Beverly Ross 
Barbara Rose Rugani 
Joyce Sargent 
Margaret Jane Strother 
Constance Margaret Szczebak 
Janice Rae Taubner 
Elinor Joan Weissbrod 
Marjorie Anne Weissinger 
Marcia Libby Werbner 
Barbara Elliott West 
Mary Ann Whitmore 
Elizabeth Norris Williams 



1781 



Master of 
Arts in 
Teaching 

Eaeritus 
Professors 

Lorin E. Ball 

Frederick A. 
McLaughlin 

Ray M. Koon 



Robert E. Young 
Promotion of 



Fred P. Jeffrey- 
appointment 



DIVISION OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 



Frank Leo Jacques, Jr. 
Raymond Joseph Anthony LeMay 
John Malcolm MacLeod 
Walter Edward Naida 
*Robert Francis Nolan 



Richard Harry Norman 
Donald Richard Ormrod 
William John Rex 
Joseph Richard Rogers, III 
John Wesley Wofford, Jr. 



*As of Class of 1953 



» 

! 



1781 



CANDIDATE FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

James Thomas Buck 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 



Albert Sloan Beecher 



Juan J. Rodriguez-Cordero 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
MASTER OF ARTS 



Hugh Frank Burgess, Jr. 
Arthur Davis Groves 
Harry Alvin Kent, Jr. 
Edward Leo Meany 



Eduardo I. Pina 
Henry Franklin Sears 
Melvin Jay Tucker 
Jules George Viau 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
MASTER OF SCIENCE 



Ronald Owen Aines 
Ward L. Akers 
Frederick 0. Ames 
Martha Fellers Averill 
Kazys Blazys 
Thomas Casey Boyd 
Joseph John Cavallaro 
Henry N. Charlap 
Gordon Marston Clark 
Lawrence Henry Couture 
Martin Sherman Cryan 
Donald Curtis 
Muriel MacArthur Curtis 
Frank A. DeChristopher 
Henry George Dihlmann 
James D. Fenn 
Margaret Ann Grayson 
Habib William Hadayah 



William Leonard Ives 
Shai Kopjdovich 
Richard Alan Koski 
Anthony William Kotula 
Frank Benjamin Kulfinski 
Frances Jane Lake 
Jerome Raymond Landry 
Paul John Latino 
Ralph Anthony Leonard 
Bruce Nicholson Levis 
Hernan Lopez-Matas 
Albert Silveira Luiz 
Edward Joseph Machno 
John Joseph Magee 
James Willis Manley 
Joseph Donald Mascis 
Everett Lewis Maynard 
James K. McDonald 
Gladys Gerlye Miller 



Master of 
Arts in 
Teaching 

Qneritus 
Professors 

Lorin E. Ball 

Frederick A. 
McLaughlin 

Ray M. Koon 



Robert E. Young 
Promotion of 



Fred P. Jeffrey- 
appointment 



Churchill H. Morgan 
Harold Edward Myers 
Ann Helen O'Donnell 
Arthur Victor Olson 
Edgardo Patino 
Norman Justin Pettipaw 
Charles F. Plumer 
Paul Nicholas Procopio 
Mark Spaulding Rand 
Walter Awoonor Renner 
Thomas Huntington Ripley 
Arnold Saul Roseman 
Zakaria Ibrahim Sabry 
Milton George Savos 
Aristotle Nicholas Siakotos 



Alvin Joseph Simmons 
Jack L. Slatoff 
Paul Sherman Smith 
Richard Smith 
Donald Jesse Steere 
James Charles Stemm 
Richard M. Sturtevant 
Robert Daniel Sullivan 
Robert Tanofsky 
Norman G. Tolman 
James A. Ubertalli 
Edward Frank Upham 
Richard James Vanasse 
John Olin Walker 
Mohamed El Basuny Zoueil 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



William B. Burford 



Fred John Pula 



Frederick Scott Silverberg 



CANDIDATE FOR DEGREE OF 
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Joseph Sol Marcus 

CANDIDATE FOR DEGREE OF 
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

John Joseph Lawlor 

CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Alexander Middleton Cruickshank — Chemistry 

Frederick John Francis — Food Technology 

Edward Duncan Hall — Chemistry 

Edward Peter Larkin — Food Science 

Jean Armand Pelissier — Agronomy 

Albert H. Tozloski — Entomology 

Donald Elvin Westcott — Food Technology 



I 



1781 



RECIPIENTS OF HONORARY DEGREES 



Murray Danforth Lincoln — Doctor of Agriculture 

Oswald Tippo — Doctor of Science 

Leonard William Morrison — Doctor of Political Science 

Alden Chase Brett — Doctor of Laws 

Leonard Carmichael — Doctor of Laws 

Ralph Albert Van Meter — Doctor of Laws 



Master of 
Arts in 
Teaching 

Emeritus 
Professors 

Lorin E. Ball 

Frederick A. 
McLaughlin 

Pay M. Koon 



I 



Robert E. Young 
Promotion of 



Fred p. Jeffrey 
appointment 



HONORS 



Phi Kappa Phi is observing its Fiftieth Anniversary at the University of 
Massachusetts. In honor of this occasion the University lists the names of 
the surviving charter members of the Class of 1904 : 

Ernest Adna Back 

Sidney Burritt Haskell 

Arthur Lee Peck 



Elected to Phi Kappa Phi in 1954 



Jeanette Nelson Akers 
Donald Westwood Barr 
Barbara Jean Bartholomew 
Barbara Elizabeth Bean 
Donald William Bell 
Lila Broude 
Margot Lois Bushey 
Harry Enon Childs 
George DeMello 
Helen Margaret Donega 
Nancy Ruth Drexel 
Claire Phyllis Ducharme 
Louise Roberta Elliot 
Marilyn Bean Everett 
Marion Jane Felton 
Stephen William Fish 
Constance Gilman 
Richard Bernard Hanrahan 
Robert Edward Hartwell 



Jeannot Brothers Heyman 
Stephanie Holmes 
Frances Louise Jones 
Helen Catherine Keefe 
Claire Marie Macdonald 
Marta Mapes 
Wayne Wilfred Marcotte 
Joan Gertrude McAlevey 
Elizabeth Ann McCarthy 
Shirley Mitchell Moser 
Mildred Irene Nyberg 
Edward Joseph O'Day, Jr. 
John Joseph Pasteris 
Constance Louise Peterson 
Jane Carolyn Roberts 
Michael Robert Stelluto 
Pauline Hill Stephan 
Paula Tattlebaum 
Barbara Ann Underhill 



From Graduate School in 1954 



Ronald Owen Aines 
Ward Leroy Akers 
James Thomas Buck 
William Leonard Ives 
Frank Benjamin Kulfinski 



Albert Silveira Luiz 
Norman Justin Pettipaw 
Paul E. Rolander 
Henry Franklin Sears 
Alvin Joseph Simmons 



Phi Beta Kappa Scholar 
Stephanie Holmes 



Phi Kappa Phi Scholar 
Stephanie Holmes 



I 



DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 



Donald Westwood Ban in Chemistry- 
Barbara Jean Bartholomew in History- 
Barbara Ruth Binsky in Economics 
David Eugene Blanchard in Animal Husbandry 
Joseph Arthur Bogni in Chemistry 
Janice Eaton Carey in Psychology 
Harry Enon Childs in Business Administration 
Natalie Ann Crowell in Landscape Architecture 
George DeMello in Romance Languages 
Helen Margaret Donega in Chemistry 
Louise Roberta Elliot in Bacteriology 
Constance Giiman in English 
Morton Harold Goldberg in Zoology 
David Royce Houston in Forestry 
Gwendolyn Hazel Judson in Animal Husbandry 
Robert Harry Leaver in Landscape Archtiecture 
Marta Mapes in Economics 
Vance Neily Morgan in Floriculture 
Marilea Anne Papalia in Animal Husbandry 
Jane Carolyn Roberts in Zoology 
Michael Robert Stelluto in Chemistry 
David Alden Storey in Agricultural Economics 
Jack Tatirosian in Zoology 
Paula Tattlebaum in Economics 
Elinor Margaret Tete in Government 
Marcia Ann Viale in Floriculture 
Allen Oscar Warner in Zoology 



Special Award of Prize Books for Outstanding Work in French 
from the French Government to : 



1781 



John Joseph Bevilaqua, Jr. 



George DeMello 



Special Award of Prize Books for Outstanding Work in Italian 
from the Italian Government to : 

Ann Margaret Cavanagh 



Master of 
Arts in 
Teaching 

Emeritus 
Professors 

Lorin E. Ball 

Frederick A, 
McLaughlin 

Ray M. Koon 



Robert E. Young 
Promotion of 



Fred P. Jeffrey- 
appointment 



. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was 

VOTED: To approve the offering of a new degree 
Master of ^rts in Teaching. 

It was 

VOTED: To elect the following former members of 
the staff to emeritus status: 

Lorin E. ^all - Assistant Professor of 
Physical Education, Emeritus. 

Frederick A. McLaughlin - Associate Pro- 
fessor of ^otany, %eritus. 

Pay M. Koon - Professor of Horticulture 
and Head of the Waltham field Station, 
Emeritus 

It was 

VOTED : To promote Robert #. Young from Associate 
Professor to Professor of Olericulture at 
the Waltham Field Station effective 
April 1, 1954- at the salary then prevail- 
ing for that grade. 

To appoint Fred P. Jeffrey now Head of 
Poultry department to Associate Dean of 
the ^chool of Agriculture and Director of 
the Stockbridge School effective October 1, 
1954 at the salary then prevailing for 
that grade. 

It was 

VOTED: To add the Librarian to the Educational 
Policies Council of the University. 

It was 

VOTED : To approve the following sabbatical 

leaves subject to availability of funds: 



1781 



Master of 
Arts in 
Teaching 

Emeritus 
Professors 

Lorin E. Ball 

Frederick A. 
McLaughlin 

Ray M. Koon 



Robert E. Young 
Promotion of 



Fred P. Jeffrey 
appointment 






1782 



TRUSTEE 



Lotta Crabtree 
Fellowship 



Land 



Merrill 
Associates 



County Circle 
dormitories 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was 

VOTED : To approve award of Lotta Crabtree 
Fellowship in the amount of $2,000 
to Mr. Ralston b. Read, Jr. for the 
college year 1954-55* 

Trustee &awes said that he had been in Amherst since the 
last meeting of the Committee on Agriculture and Horticulture and 
had examined the two farms adjoining the University which have been 
considered for purchase. He said he is strongly convinced that 
both farms are needed for the future development of the University 
and that steps should be taken to acquire the land as early as 
possible. He urged that an item for land purchase be placed in the 
next budget of the University. 

It was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth W. 

Johnson, to sign a contract with Merrill 
Associates of boston for engineering ser- 
vices for the design and supervision of 
construction of a turbo-generator for the 
power plant at a fee of 6%. 

It was 

VOTED : To change the normal occupancy of student 
rooms in the County Circle dormitories 
from two men in a room to one and to in- 
crease the rental rate per student to 
$165 per academic year of two semesters. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:15 p«m. 




Qpr^vt^ 



**J"t3 <*yvtfiOc 



Secretary 



Chairman 



5TEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF SEMI-ANNUAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
June 5j 1954-* 11:00 a.m., Butterfield House, Amherst, Mass. 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 



1783 



PRESENT: 



Trustees Bartlett, Boyden, Brett, 
Brown, Miss Buxton, Cashin, Crowley, 
Haigis, Hoftyzer, McDermott, 
Mrs. McNamara, Taber, Whitmore, 
President Mather, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary Burke 



It was 



VOTED: To dispense with reading of the call and 

reading of the minutes of the last meeting. 

On the recommendation of the faculty and of the President, 

it was unanimously 

VOTED : To award the following degrees to the can- 
didates listed on the attached Commencement 
program for 1954: 

College of Arts and Science 
185 Bachelor of Arts 
112 Bachelor of Science 

School of Agriculture and Horticulture 
92 Bachelor of Science 
4. Bachelor of Vocational Administration 

School of Business Administration 

75 Bachelor of Business Administration 

School of Engineering 

1 Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Engineering 

8 Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering 

9 Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering 
8 Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 

19 Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 

School of Home Economics 

56 Bachelor of Science 

Division of Physical Education 
10 Bachelor of Science 

Total - 579 



Degrees 



1784 



TRUSTEE 



R. A. Van Meter 

President 

Emeritus 



Veterans Ad- 
ministration 
Educational 
Contract 



Budget 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

On the recommendation of the faculty of the Graduate 

School and of the President, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To award the following degrees to the 
candidates as listed on the attached 
Commencement program for 1954.: 

1 Bachelor of Landscape Architecture 

2 Master of Landscape Architecture 
9 Master of Arts 

67 Master of Science 

3 Master of Business Administration 

1 Master of Science in Civil Engineering 

1 Master of Science in Electrical Engineering 

7 Doctor of Philosophy 

Total - 91 

It was unanimously 

VOTED : To elect Dr. Ralph A. Van Meter, President, 
Emeritus, effective May 15, 1954-. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that the contract with the 

Veterans Administration for education and training under Public 

Law 34-6 and Public Law 16 needs to be extended to cover the summer 

programs of the University and it was unanimously 

VOTED: To authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth V. 
Johnson to sign negotiated Contract No, 
V300IV-1650 with the Veterans Administra- 
tion providing for education and training 
during the regular summer session and 
special courses offered during the summer 
at the same rates as for prior years. 

President Mather reported that the budget of the Uni- 
versity just passed by the Legislature for the year beginning 
July 1, 1954- is a record budget for any one year. The capital out- 
lay budget also establishes a new high with appropriations for an 
addition to the Chemistry Building, the new Physical Education 
Building for Women, the new Classroom Building and amounts for ex- 
tension of utilities. He said that the Administration is now 



17oD 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

preparing next year* s budget and is planning to take a long-range 
view in submitting financial requests to the Legislature. From now 
on, he said, capital outlay requests should be evened off at one 
or two buildings a year for a steady development. 

The President spoke of the salary increases provided in 
the budget just passed. On the recommendation of the Trustees, in- 
creases were provided under the agricultural reorganization plan 

and for administrative officers and other twelve months' employees. 
In addition to this, the Legislature provided an additional step- 
rate increase which takes effect at the beginning of the 5th year 
of employment in all grades. About 60$ of the employees of the 
University are now eligible for this increase, and others will re- 
ceive it as they complete their 4-th year of service and begin their 
5th. The Baby Hoover Commission recommended and the Legislature 
approved salary increases in the grade of Instructor, Assistant Pro- 
fessor, Associate Professor and Head of Department, and increases 
were provided in 47 non-professional grades. 

Because these increases were of several sorts and came 
from different sources, there are some salary maladjustments and 
it will be the aim of the administration to correct these malad- 
justments in the next budget. 

As to capital outlay, the President suggested that con- 
sideration should be given to an addition to the Library, and that 
the -Power Plant will need to be increased in size and capacity be- 
fore further buildings can be constructed beyond those now 
authorized. 



1786 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was 

VOTED : To hold the next meeting of the Board in 
Boston on Tuesday, June 29, at 12:30 at 
which time the budget of the University 
for the year beginning July 1, 1955 will 
be considered and acted upon. 

It was agreed that the Committee on Faculty and Program 
of Study would meet at 12 o'clock on Tuesday, June 29 > in Boston, 

It was agreed that the Buildings and Grounds Committee 
of the Board would meet on Thursday, June 24., at the University to 
consider a capital outlay program and to prepare recommendations 
concerning the employment of an architectural designer as proposed 
by Governor Herter at the May 1954- meeting of the Board. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that an item of $10,000 has 
been requested in the supplementary budget for the employment of 
an architectural designer. 

President Mather said that a committee of 3 members of 
the faculty will search out candidates for the position of Dean of 
Arts and Science. The President will sit as chairman and 9th 
member of this committee. Four of the 8 faculty members are from 

the Arts departments and 4- from the Science departments. All 3 
were elected to the committee by their colleagues. The J+ from 
Arts are Professor Theodore C. Caldwell of the Department of 
History, Professor Fred C. Ellert, Head of the Department of 
German, Professor Maxwell H. Goldberg of the Department of English 
and Professor J. Henry Korson, Head of the Department of Sociology. 
The 4 from Science are Professor Gilbert 1>. Voodside, Head of the 
Department of Zoology and Dean of the Graduate School, Professor 

J. Harold Smith of the Department of Chemistry, Professor Allen E. 



Honorary Degree Citation 
Balph Albert ?an Meter 



For thirty-seven years you have served our University* Tou have served 
far beyond the oall of professional duty and to the point of eelf-sacrifice* 

Especially in the last decade and a half, our history is that of your 
patient, self-forgetful, far-sighted, elevated, and uniting leadership in a 
troubled time. It beers the mark of your high integrity, largeness of spirit, 
democratic faith in individual dignity, and a human warmth that has won uni- 
versal affection. 

In this period, you were called to aaat.sr two converging crises - a 
world war and its aftermath; and University expansion, and you rose admirably 
to this double challenge. Xcu did so with fortitude and inspiring largeness 
of vision. Your magnanimity is shown in the generous pattern you have ad- 
vocated for our eraergence as a great university. It is a measure of your 
largeness of spirit that, though yourself a devoted specialist respecting the 
role of the specialist, you have insisted that a liberal and general education 
is the hallmark of the university aan. 

It is a measure of this spirit that you have declared and stood by the 
democratic principle that "opportunities in higher education should not be 
fixed by color of the skin; nor by the place of residence* ..nor by religion, 
nor by sex, nor by financial status of the parents, but by capacity for learn* 
lag only«»*£p£ each according to his need; tft each according to his ability** 

Through such large convictions, spelled out in specific terms, backed 
tgr action, and projected into the future, you have associated, in spirit, with 
Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln, and other champions of democratic higher 
education; and it le for these convictions that we greet you today as true 
educational statesman and beloved leader* 

I, therefore, by authority of the Beard of Trustees of the University of 
Massachusetts, confer upon you the degree of Doctor of laws, honoris causa, 
together with all the rights, honors and privileges which appertain to that 
degree here or elsewhere. In token of this, I present ; ou with this dlploaa 
and invest you with the appropriate hood* 












AH 






^.c 









fRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Andersen, Head of the Department of Mathematics and Professor 
Theodore T. Kozlowski, Head of the Department of Botany. 

In answer to question from Chairman Bartlett, President 
Mather said that the committee has not been instructed that it must 
go outside the University for candidates. The position is open to 
any candidate from any source who will best fill the position. 

The President said that he has also begun tbie search for 
candidates for the position of Provost. These candidates will be 
reviewed by the Educational Policies Council of the University and 
recommendations will be made to the Board. He emphasized that 
candidates for the position of Dean of Arts and Science and candi- 
dates for the position of Provost, after being sifted, will be 
brought before the Board in person and interviewed for final 
selection by the Board. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Finance, it was 

VOTED; To authorize the Treasurer to discharge the 
Chi Omega mortgage, payment having been 
made in full. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Finance, it was 

VOTED : To authorize and request the Chairman of the 
Board to request an opinion from the Attorney 
General on the legality of the proposed sub- 
ordination agreement with the Amherst Savings 
Bank relative to the Theta Chi property. 

In accordance with the vote of the Trustees on May 11, 

195Af the following citation read at the award of the degree Doctor 

of Laws, honoris causa, to Dr. Ralph A. Van Meter on June 6, 1954- 

is hereby made part of the records of the Board. 



The meeting was ad jo 



t 12 noon. 




cr*AJjU *SJ3<*sJJ*U- 



Secretary 
Chairman 



1787 



Chi Omega 
Sorority 



Theta Chi 
Fraternity 



Citation for 
R. A. Van Metei 



1788 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Non-citizen 

faculty 

members 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

June 29, 1954, 12:45 P^., Hotel Statler, Boston 

Chairman . Bartlett, presiding 

PRESENT; Trustees Bartlett, Boyden, Brett, 

Whitmore, Mrs. McNamara, Miss Buxton, 
Haves, Brown, Crowley, McDenaott, 
Taber, Cashin, President Mather, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Burke 

Question was raised concerning the appointment of non- 
citizens to the faculty of the University, It was agreed that a 
university could not afford to impose artificial limits on its 
breadth through the exclusion of individuals who might make out- 
standing and unique contributions to research or to instruction. 
However, it was felt that the matter of tenure for non-citizens 
should be reviewed. It was 

VOTED ; To refer the question of tenure for non- 
citizens to the President. 

It was 

VOTED : To dispense with reading of the call and 

reading of the minutes of the last meeting. 

Trustee Whitmore, Chairman of the Committee on Buildings Capital 

Outlay 
and Grounds reported on the actions of his committee under date Program 

of June 28 and 29. On the recommendation of the Committee on 

Buildings and Grounds, it was 

VOTED: To approve the following capital outlay 
program for the fiscal years 1956-1960. 
(See attached) 

The Trustees considered the committee recommendation that Land 

Purchase 
$25,000 be added to the budget for land purchases, and it was 

VOTED: Not to include this item in the budget at 

the present time but to authorize Treasurer 
Johnson to add up to $25,000 for land purchase 
at a later date if the Trustees at that time 
consider a land purchase feasible. 



1789 



1790 



TRUSTEE 



Matuszko 
Land 



Architects 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Hawes spoke of the desirability of purchasing the 
Matuszko farm lands at the present time. President Mather said 
that he has requested a land use plan from the School of Agricul- 
ture and would like to wait upon the receipt of that plan and study 
by the master planners before making specific recommendation for 
purchase of the Matuszko property. After discussion, it was 

VOTED 8 To refer possible purchase of the 

Matuszko farm lands to the Committee 
on Agriculture and Horticulture with 
instructions for that committee to re- 
port at the October meeting of the 
Board. 

Upon the recommendation of the Committee on Buildings 

and ^rounds, it was 

VOTED; To invite the following architectural firms 
to submit proposals concerning architectural 
coordination at the University. From this 
list the Trustees will later select one firm 
as architectural coordinator 

1. Perry, Shaw, Hepburn, Kehoe & Dean of Boston 

2. Shepley, Bulfinch, Richardson, Abbott of Boston 

3. McGinnis & Walsh of Boston 
4.. Colletti Brothers of Boston 

5. Cram & Ferguson of Boston 

6. Leland & Larson of Boston 

7. Shurcliff & Shurcliff of Boston 

To this list the Trustees added the 
name of William B. Colleary of Centerviile 

Upon the recommendation of the Committee on Buildings 

and Grounds, it was 

VOTED: To approve the following architects: In no 

priority order, for study of additions to the 
Library and construction of a Liberal Arts 
Building: 

Shepley & Bulfinch of i^oston 

Perry, Shaw, HepTourn, Kehoe & Dean of Boston 

McGinnis & Walsh of Boston 



1791 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

For the vegetable gardening building and 
greenhouse, priority order as follows: 

1. Clinton Goodwin of Haverhill 

2. Maloney & Tessier of Springfield 

3. William B. Colleary of Centerville 

For fire and safety alterations in the amount 
of |72,000, in the following priority order: 

1. Alderman & Mac^eish of Springfield 

2. Bradley & Gass of Pittsfield 

3. McClintock & Sprague of Springfield 

Chairman ^artlett said that the M. A. Dyer Company was Public 

Health 
originally employed to prepare plans for the Public Health Building. 

This firm has been paid $39,000 for completed plans. However, the 
bid price by the lowest bidding contractor is about one half million 
dollars over the amount estimated by the Dyer Company for the 
project. Treasurer Johnson reported that the Public Building 
Commission, representatives from the State Department of Public 
Health, and Treasurer Johnson representing the University, had con- 
ferred this morning with Mr. Dyer. The Building Commission asked 
Mr. Dyer whether he would be willing to redesign the building with- 
in the amount of money available and at no additional cost. 
Mr. Dyer is considering the matter and will report later to the 
Commission. 

Chairman Bartlett said that it is agreed that no addi- 
tional state money is to be provided for the Public Health Building. 
It was 

VOTED: That if a new architect is employed for the 

Public Health Building, the following priority 
order is to be followed: 

1. Cram & Ferguson of Boston 

2. Leland & Larson of Boston 

3. Colletti brothers of Boston 



1792 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



TRUSTEE 



Havis, 
John R. - 
Head, Waltham 
Field Station 



Promotions 



Trustee Brett reported on the combined meeting of the 

Committee on Agriculture and Horticulture with the Committee on 

Faculty and Program of Study, and on the joint recommendation of 

these committees, it was unanimously 

VOTED: To appoint Dr« John R. Havis as Head 

of the Waltham Field Station effective 
July 1, 195A. 

Trustee Boyden reported for the Committee on Faculty 

and Program of Study, and on the recommendation of this committee, 

it was 

VOTED: To authorize the following promotions 
effective September 1, 1954-2 

Arthur E. Niedeck - promotion from Associate 

Professor to Professor of 
Speech. 

William G. O'Donnell - promotion from Associate 

Professor to Professor of 
English. 

Elmer C. Osgood - promotion from Associate Professor 

to Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Stanley C. Vance - promotion from Associate Professor 

to Professor of Industrial Ad- 
ministration. 

Lawrence S. Dickinson - promotion from Associate Pro- 
fessor to Professor of 
Agrostology. 

E. Ernest Lindsey - promotion from Professor to Head 

of Department of Chemical 
Engineering. 

William H. Weaver - promotion from Professor to Head 

of Departaient of Mechanical 
Engineering. 

Upon the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was 



TEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED; To approve the request of Maurice E. Bates 
to be transferred from his present position 
as Head of the Department of Mechanical 
Engineering to full Professor of Mechanical, 
Engineering effective September 1, 1954- 

Upon the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was unanimously 

VOTED; To appoint Dr. Roland W. Winterfield as 
Research Professor of Veterinary Science 
effective August 1, 1954- 

Upon the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was unanimously 

VOTED ; To approve the following new undergraduate 
courses of study; 

Home Economics 41 - Nutrition and Food Preparation. 

This course combines the fundamentals of nutrition 

with food preparation and meal, planning to meet 

nutritional requirements. The content and emphasis 

is appropriate for nurses whose responsibilities 

will be mostly with their patients. This course 

follows closely the outline suggested in Curriculum 

for Schools of Nursing. By permission of instructor. 

3 class hours, 1 3-hr. laboratory period Credit 4 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 1 and 2, and Zoology 35. 

Home Economics 42 - Medical Dietetics. The principles 
and practice of dietary restrictions and modifications 
recommended for certain diseases, always keeping in 
mind the nutritional needs of the individual. Students 
learn to use current medical literature for supplementary 
reference in connection with new developments. 
2 class hours Credit 2 

Prerequisite: Home Economics 41, or equivalent. 

Speech 63 (I) - Television Programming and Production. 

An exploration of the television medium for orientation 

in producing, directing and writing: network, local and 

educational operations both studio and remote. 

2 class hours; 1 2-hour laboratory period. Credit 3 

Speech 64 (II) - Television Programming and Production. 
Practical television techniques from effective planning 
through effective execution by people off camera and on 
camera. 



2 class hours; 1 2-hour laboratory period. 
Prerequisite Speech 63 • 



Credit 3 



1793 



Bates, Maurice 
E. - Professor 



Winterfield, 
Roland V. 



New Courses 



1794 



TRUSTEE 



Graduate 
Course 



Quality Point 

Grading 

System 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Speech 65 (I) - Writing for Television. A consideration 
of television writing methods for the successful produc- 
tion of all types of formats. 
3 class hours. Credit 3 

Speech 66 (II) - Film Production and Staging for Tele- 
vision. Preparation and execution of 16 mm films for 
television; the course will prepare a 10-minute film 
project from the idea to editing, processing, screening 
and narration. 

2 class hours; 1 2-hour laboratory period Credit 3 
Prerequisite: Speech 63 • 

History of Philosophy 65 (I) - Ancient and Medieval. 
A survey of development of western thought with emphasis 
on the cultural factors which generated and interacted 
with the successive philosophical interpretations of 
man' s experience. 

3 class hours. Credit 3 

History of Philosophy 66 (II) - Modern. Attention is 
centered on the impact of modern science on the develop- 
ment of man's comprehensive understanding of the world, 
of the powers and limitations of knowledge, and of the 
basis of his valuations. 
3 class hours. Credit 3 

Philosophy of Science 72 (II) - A study of the back- 
grounds, presuppositions, methods and general theories 
of modern physical, biological and social sciences. 
Readings selected from the works of leading scientists 
and philosophers will be used as the basis of class dis- 
cussions which will attempt to explore the great scientific 
achievements of our time and to assess their importance 
in the student's construction of a mature philosophic 
orientation. 
3 class hours. Credit 3 

Upon the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was 

VOTED; To approve the following new graduate course: 

German 222, Advanced Spoken German. Prerequisite, 
German 79 and 80 or their equivalents as de- 
termined by a qualifying examination. 

Upon the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was 

VOTED: To adopt the quality point grading system 

for the undergraduate college in accordance 
with the attached program. 



1795 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Upon the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was 

VOTED : To approve the following changes in require?* 
ments for degrees in the Graduate School: 

1. Letter grades are to be substituted for 
numerical grades. 

2. Only grades of A, B, or C are to be 
allowed for graduate credit with no more 
than 6 credits of C for the Master's de- 
gree, or 12 credits of C for the Ph.D. 
degree. 

3» A grade of C for the thesis will not be 
allowed. 

Chairman Bartlett reported that he had not yet received 
a written opinion from the Attorney General as to the legality of 
a subordination agreement relative to the Theta Chi property. The 
Chairman then read an application from the Theta Chi fraternity for 
a loan in the amount of $40,000 so that the fraternity might con- 
strict an addition to its chapter house. Enclosed with the appli- 
cation from the fraternity was an appraisal by B. 0. ?4oody of the 
First National Bank expressing the belief that the Theta Chi 
property has a replacement value of $80,000 and that a fair 
market value would be $60,000. After discussion, it was 

VOTED: To refer the Theta Chi application to the 
Executive Committee. 

President Mather reported that each year the students 

vote to tax themselves for certain activities. These student taxes 

together with assessments by the University for the athletic program 

amount to $38.50 a year over and above tuition costs. This year 

for seniors 
the students have voted to raise the tax/by $1.00 with the increase 

going to the Alumni for dues. It was unanimously 



Theta Chi 
Loan 



Student 
Tax 



1796 



TRUSTEE 



Trust 
Funds 



Commonwealth 
Scholarships 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

for senior students 
VOTED; To approve the addition in the tax/ of 
.09 as voted by the students. 



President Mather submitted a report of expenditures from 

unearmarked Trust Funds as authorized by the Trustees for the 

year ending June 30, 1954-* and it was 

VOTED; To approve the expenditures as listed. 

(See attached list) 

It was 

VOTED; To authorize the President to expend $1,000 
from the income of unearmarked trust funds 
for the year beginning July 1, 1954- and to 
expend $500 from the Sprague grant for the 
same period. 

The Trustees considered recommendations from the Uni- 
versity Scholarship Committee and the President, and after 
discussion, it was 

VOTED ; To award Commonwealth Scholarships for the 
academic year 1954--55 to the following 25 
students; 

Frederic J. Arold, Methuen Arnold Vestlund, Jr., Gloucester 

Douglas VI. Bannon, Springfield . Charles H. Wilson, Jr., Fall River 

Martin Bernheimer, Norton Francis Voodin, Pittsfield 

Anthony J. Bevivino, Springfield Elsie Ann Bigelow, Rutland 

Maurice G. Croteau, Uxbridge Carol Ann Bjork, Whitman 

Ralph J. D'Amato, Agawam Barbara E. Christensen, Fall River 

John Hamilton Fahey, Framingham Mary Frances Coffey, Holyoke 

Rudolph Gottschlich, Warren Bernardine Florence Goot, Ipswich 

Rodernick Lavallee, Jr., Wilkin- Priscilla S. Harling, West Roxbury 

sonville 

Thomas P. ^ialiska, Winchendon Susan A. Hearty, North Andover 

David Arthur Olson, Athol Dianne Parker, Wellesley 

Adelbert S. Weaver, Barnstable Marilyn J. Peach, Foxboro 

Barbara Tatham, Lynn 



rEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was 

VOTED : To approve the following 14- alternates to 
whom Commonwealth Scholarships may be 
awarded in the event that they are not used 
by any of the 25 students as approved above: 



Kenneth Clark, Williamstown 
Henry R. Groebe, New Bedford 
HaroM F. Cooper, East Princeton 

Robert K. Morse, ^elchertown 
Richard S. Fouracre, North boro 
Stuart Anthony Ball, Auburn 
William John Creane, Holyoke 



J. Kenneth Taylor, Lawrence 
Louise Allen Fisher, Medfield 
Norma Lindsey Stackpole, New 

Bedford 
Myrna Dubbin, Holyoke 
Janet Re Bean, Amesbury 
Carol A. Bertrand, Oxbridge 
Nancy Eleanor Valenti, Holyoke 



1797 



President Mather reported that the following students 
have withdrawn from the University and their Commonwealth Scholar- 
ships may now be awarded to other students: 

Richard T. Lyons, «57 Ralph F. Pittsley, »57 
Stanley Shuman, * 57 Lorraine Cole, '55 

Helen R. Gaudette, '55 

The Trustees 

VOTED : To approve awards of Commonwealth Scholar- 
ships in place of the above students to 
Donald W. Gladstone, »57, Lon D. Hodge, »57; 
with Robert Hinckley, '57, Eugene Kay, »57, 
Malcolm L. Jackson, * 57, and Arthur W. 
Anti, '57 as first, second, third, and 
fourth alternates. 

It was also 

VOTED : To award Commonwealth Scholarships to Nada 
Fedoryshyn f 55> and Micy A. Tibbals '55 
with &. Diane Courtney '55 and Dorothy E. 
Huebner * 55 as first and second alternate. 

It was 

VOTED: To authorize the treasurer, Kenneth W. 
Johnson, to renew contracts with the 
Veterans' Administration for education and 
training under Public Law 34-6 and Public 
Law 16 for the year beginning July 1, 195A 
as follows: 



Contract No. V 30&IV 
Contract No. V 300IV 
Contract No. V 300IV 



1687 for four year students 
1667 for graduate students 
1626 for Stockbridge students 



Veterans 
Training 



1798 



TRUSTEE 



President' s 
House 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Cashin said that he had learned that morning 
that President Van Meter had paid a rental of $20.00 per month 
for the President's House and that this rate was to be increased 
to $118.00 per month for a new occupant. In addition, the 
occupant is given his choice of purchasing the state-owned furni- 

i H 

ture in the house or buying his own. 

Treasurer Johnson explained that all state-owned houses 

or dwelling quarters have a rental valuation established by the 

Commission on Administration and Finance; also that the state has 

discontinued its policy of buying furnishings. Everywhere in the 

state the old low rates are allowed to prevail until the living 

quarters change hands at which time the new rates established by 

the Commission go into effect. President Mather says that he is 

paying somewhat less than this amount each month on his present 

home and that eventually he will own the home if he continues to 

live there. The Trustees pointed out that the President's home is 

not a private residence but is a community center used to conduct 

official business and entertainment for the University. Rules and 

regulations governing private residences should not prevail in 

this particular case. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To refer to Chairman Bartlett the matter 

of rental and furnishings of the President' s 
House. 

The hour being late, it was agreed that proper attention 

could not be given to the University budget at this meeting, and 

it was 



June 25, 1954 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



CAPITAL OUTLAY PROGRAM 
FIVE-YEAR PROGRAM FOR FISCAL YEARS 1956-1960 



Priority Project 

1256 

1. (Addition to Library (#1)* 
(Liberal Arts Classroom 

Building* 

2. Addition to Power Plant 

(Including Boilers, 
Generators & Utility 
Additions, etc. ) 

3. Vegetable Gardening Bldg. 

& Greenhouses 

4. Completion of Dormitory #13 

for 231 Men 

5. Dormitory #14 for 400 Men 



Univ. of Mass. 
Bldg. Association 
State Funds Funds 



,000,000 
2,000,000 



1,000,000 



250,000 



600,000 



1,000,000 



$5,250,000 



ipl,600,000 



w 



^Because of the close physical relationship of these two projects, 
they should be studied together, and if architecturally desirable, 
might be constructed as adjoining buildings. 



The projects for 1957-1960 are subject to further study. 



1957 

1. Science Building (Biological (>3, 500, 000 

Sciences, Geology, Botany, 
etc. ) 

2. Garage & Service Bldg. for Pit. 500,000 

3. Addition to Food Technology 500,000 

4. Cold Storage Laboratory 250,000 

(replace Fisher) 
5« Dorm". #15 for 155 Women 
6. 1st Pt. Dorm. #16 for 145 Men 



§4,750,000 



350,000 
350,000 



i 700,000 



v ::#"■ 



'riority Project 
1953 



CAPITAL OUTLAY PROGRAM - Page 2 

State Funds 



1. 
2. 

3. 

4. 
5. 
6. 

7. 
3. 
9. 



1. 

2. 

3. 

4. 
5. 
6. 

7. 



1. 
2, 

3. 

4. 

I: 

7. 



Infirmary 

Natural Resources Building 

School of Education and Practice 

School Building 
Adds. & Impts. to Utilities 
Poultry Lab. & Plant Buildings 
ROTC Armory and Classrooms 
Engineering Shops 
Complete Dorm #16 for 216 Men 
Dormitory #17 for 134 Women 



1959 

Addition to Dining Commons 
Addition to Physics Building 
Engineering Building 
Gymnasium, Phys. Ed. for Men 
Animal Industries Building 
Dormitory #13 for 437 Men 
Dormitories #19 & #20 for 363 Women 



1960 

Bus. Admin. Classroom Bldg. 
Horticulture & Agronomy Labs, 
Administration Building 
Auditorium & Music Center 
Farm Building Replacements 
Dormitory #21 for 471 Men 
Dormitory #22 for 329 Women 



$1,000,000 
1, OOO'.OOO 
1,500*000 

300,000 
100,000 
500,000 
600,000 



1 , 000 , 000 
1,500,000 
1,000,000 
3,000,000 

500,000 



U of M 
Bldg. Assoc 
Funds 



$ 



550,000 
450,000 



#5,000,000 $1,000,000 



$ 750,000 
1,250,000 
1,500,000 
1,500,000 

300,000 

1,100,000 

900,000 



$5,300,000 $2,000,000 



1,250,000 
350,000 



$7,000,000 $2,100,000 



TOTAL - FIVE-YEAR PROGRAM 



$27 , 300 , 000 ^7 , 400 , 000 



Notes: 

1. ""All project estimates include furnishings, equipment, site 
improvements, architects 1 fees and other costs of the project. 
These estimates are subject to change based upon cost estimates 
made by architects and engineers 1 studies. 

2. All buildings are based on needs established by projected 
estimates of enrollments revised to conform to a gradual growth 
of the University. These enrollment figures show that an appro- 
priation is needed in the fiscal year indicated to complete the 
building for use as the student body reaches the size where 
existing space is overcrowded. 



UNX¥ERSI?I OF MASSACHUSETTS 



DISBURSEMENTS — UIHESTRIGTED ENDGMlffiK FUHDS 
FOR THE PERIOD JULY 1, 1953-«nJHE 22,1954 



Bnrnham Emergency 

Boarding Hall --4 Luncheons , Trustee Meeting $ 5^25 
Provate Court, Litchfield r Coniu s Copy of 2o00 

Will, Hannah K. Crooke 
Everett A* Kosarick, 12 pictures of Hew 6»50 

Dining Commons 
Arthur Co Egan, 46 Aerial Pictures of 57° 50 

New Buildings 
Roberts Flowers , flowers for Hon. Tobin's 15° 75 

Funeral 
Hotel Statler * 3 Luncheons , Trustee Meeting 12*15 
Boarding Hall — 6 Luncheons , Women* s 7=50 

Advisory Council 
Boarding Hall — 17 Luncheons, Commencement 28*75 
Hotel Statler — 5 Luncheons, Trustee Meeting 28*75 
Boarding Hall — 11 Luncheons, College 16*50 

Business Officers 
Marvin Richmond — Motion Pictures, Rodgers 35*00 

and Hammerstein 
Fred V. Cahill - Luncheon 2,00 

Roberts Flowers, flowers for Rodgers and 28,00 

Hammerstein Convocation 
Arthur C« Egan, Jr* , 8 prints, Rodgers 10*00 

and Hammerstein 
University Commons, 6 dinners, Advisory 9*00 

Council of Women 
Hotel Statler, 4 Luncheons, Trustee Meeting 17 » 27 

Total $281 o 92 

Fo H* Read 



Scholarships - partial payments on three $56„14 

Scholarships m , ,, 

Total 56o 14 

William R* Sessions 

Hotel Statler - 6 Luncheons, Trustee Meeting #20*69 

Wellworth Pharmacy - 4 rolls Film 21*56 

Boarding Hall - 19 Luncheons, Assoc. Alumni 30,00 

Boarding Hall - 6 » , Div. of Bldg* Const . 10.50 

Pres Mather - 4 Luncheons at Parker House 8*55 

in connection with Student Union Bldg* 

Montgomery Co», Inc.:., Flowers purchased by 15*00 

Donald Ross 

University Commons, 6 cheons 5*70 

Esquire Cleaners ' 4 & 50 

University Commons , sheons 33-00 

Marvin Richmond - Film, Supplies & Coverage 40*00 

of Rodgers and Hammerstein Awards ____»_«„ i<»^ ** 

■■•■ ~" 189 o 50 



Sttfovarsmm fereartric snt Funds, Page 2 



William i 



Roberts Floweri 

&chmer*s 
Kr tar Freai cards and en."$ elopes 35*50. 

Deav. a 
Beta Kappa *g 125*00 

fa ■'■'ach 5»50 

and Cra- 

Mieqfi • > Fath< mokv 15*00 

Funeral 
Everett A. Sos 12 repriats, 

Aerial Vie* 
Kinsman *s StudS otograpns of 13 c, 50 

Pres* Math< 
Iraushar Freas or State ■ 23,00 

University 
Enmilton fteWell.. cards* letterheads for 54*90 

Women's Council 
W* Bradford Johnson, Slides for 1953 20 

Eorticultu- Show 
Mary k» Malier - Travel Expenses for 15»12 

Interview 
Everett A* Kos; prz~: • varsity 3*00 

Coasnons 
Arthur C« Egan, Jr. - 7 pr~. j B.75 

C offlmons 
Herrick Studio photos for Placement 6o25 

Office 
Roberts Flower flowers ,-raa^s 1©«00 

Fimeral 
Arthur C* Egan of Ual i 16 

Coaaxions , $ " Redgera 

Kamnerstei 
Kinsman *s S 9- 

Math ; 
Everett A, ick» of 5 

Rodger® & nerst 
Hamilton 53*50 

Rodgers & ' lerstein Program 
Arthur G.Egaiij lasts, .International 3*75 

Health & Edus« Coz;: ,e • fc ^««— .»— 

Total $423 o 22 



TGTAr.. 3STRIGTED ?*J'IBS 



1799 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



rEE 



VOTED: To meet on Wednesday, July 14, at 6:30 p.m< 
at the Hotel Statler to consider and act 
upon the University budget for the year be- 
ginning July 1, 1955 and to transact such 
other business as may be presented. 

The meeting was adjourned at 5:00 p.m. 







^Secretary 



Chairman 



1800 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOABD OF TRUSTEES 
Wednesday, July 14, 1954, 6:30 p.m., Hotel Statler, Boston 

Chaiiman Bartlett presiding 



PRESENT: 



Trustees Bartlett, Desmond, Cashin, 
McDermott, Hawes, Crowley, Brett, 
Taber, brown, Whitmore, Miss Buxton, 
President Mather, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary Burke 



It was 



1801 



VOTED; To dispense with reading of the call and 

reading of the minutes of the last meeting. 

The Trustees discussed the budget for the University for 
the year beginning July 1, 1955* President Mather reviewed regis- 
tration figures for the fall, indicating that enrollment would be 
held substantially to last year's figure. He then reviewed the 
major items in the budget, pointing out especially the need for 
greater amounts for maintenance. He said that with the growth of 
the University the maintenance figures of previous budgets are no 
longer sufficient and that the buildings and property are being 
badly neglected. He called attention to the run-down and un- 
sanitary conditions in the County Circle dormitories. More workers, 
more equipment and more supplies are needed if the University is 
to take care of its property and keep it in decent condition for 
student use. 

Commissioner Desmond suggested that Governor Herter might 
be willing to recommend immediate action in his message to the 
Legislature, especially after an inspection by the Department of 
Public Health. 



1802 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was also suggested that the present appropriation for 
maintenance should be used to correct conditions in these dormi- 
tories. This would mean that funds would not be sufficient to 
cover other badly needed work but supplementary funds might then 
be sought when the Legislature was in session. 

President Mather urged the support of members of the 
Board of Trustees when the University has its hearings before the 
Legislature and before the various commissions this fall and winter 

Treasurer Johnson described how the budget was prepared. 
The various School Deans, Department Heads and others prepared 
budgets and were given oral hearings before the President, 
Treasurer, the Secretary and the Business Manager. These officers 
reduced by approximately one million dollars the total askings of 
the School Deans to reduce the budget to a size which could be 
asked for realistically in one year. The Treasurer also described 
the special appropriations listed in the budget. 

The Trustees then discussed the various items of the 

budget and it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Administration to submit 
to the Legislature a total maintenance 
budget in the amount of $6,903 > 114- for the 
year beginning July 1, 1955 ♦ 

It was also 

VOTED : To authorize the Administration to submit 

a budget for special appropriations for the 
year beginning July 1, 1955 in the amount 
of |85,275 for projects as follows: 

1. Architectural designers services....|10,000 

2. Reimbursable research. 50,000 

3. Certain salary ad justments. •••••••• . 275 

4.. Commonwealth Scholarships. . . * 25 >000 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was 

VOTED; To authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth W. 

Johnson, to sign contract in the name of 
and for the Board of Trustees with the 
International Business Machines Corpora- 
tion for the furnishing of electrical . 
accounting machines, machine services, 
and for the lease of certain IBM equip- 
ment. 

It was 

VOTED ; To authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth ¥. 

Johnson, to sell 2 2/25 shares of common 
stock of Northern Illinois Gas Company. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that for the year ending 

June 30, 1954 there was a shortage of $19.33 in the petty cash 

account of the Receiving Teller representing cumulative cash 

variances recorded during the year. This variance was caused 

largely by an uncollectible check. After discussion, it was 

VOTED; To authorize the Treasurer to use the 
Trust Fund Interest Account to balance 
the petty cash in the amount of $19.33. 

President Mather reported that Miss Catherine L. Carney 

has completed all requirements for the degree of Master of Science 

She was to have received this degree on June 7, 1954- hut because of 

illness had failed to submit certain papers in the form required by 

the Graduate School. These have since been submitted. It was 

VOTED; To award the degree, Master of Science, to 

Miss Catherine L. Carney as of June 7, 1954- 

There was discussion as to a name for the new women's 

dormitory and it was 

VOTED: To authorize the use of a mail ballot for 

selection of a name for this building follow- 
ing recommendation from a campus committee 
to be appointed by the President. 



1803 



International 
Business 
Machines 
Corporation 

contract 



Stock 



Petty Cash 
Account 



Degree - Master 
of Science for 
Catherine L» 
Carney 



1804 



TRUSTEE 



Theta Chi 
Fraternity 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

At the request of certain members of the Board, Treasurer 
Johnson agreed to submit at the next meeting a detailed report of 
the salary changes accomplished by the Reorganization Plan. 

Chairman Bartlett reported that the latest word received 
from the Attorney General's office is that the Trustees cannot 
enter into a subordination agreement with the Theta Chi fraternity 
relative to the recapture provision. However, the Trustees are 
free to use endowment funds for a mortgage loan to the fraternity. 

Treasurer Johnson said that the total amount of endow- 
ment of the University is about $297,000. Of this amount, 
$59,000 is mortgages and there is a cash balance of about $55,000 
in savings banks. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To approve a mortgage loan of $32, 500 'which 
with the present $7500 mortgage loan will 
make a total of $40,000) from endowment 
funds to the Theta Chi fraternity as a con- 
struction mortgage for an addition to the 
chapter house, the loan to be subject to all 
legal requirements and the terms and condi- 
tions to be finally passed upon by the 
Executive Committee which is empowered to 
act for the full Board in completing arrange- 
ments for the loan. 

The meeting was adjourned at 10:30 p.m. 




TZ&^U 



*. kA^Q ooJJUJiK 



jBecretary 



Chairman 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



September 29, 1954 



Board of Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts 

The following mail ballot authorized by vote of the 

Board of Trustees on July 14, 1954- is hereby made part of the 

records of the Board. 

I vote to approve the name ARNOLD HOUSE for 
the new Women's dormitory. 



Joseph W. Bartlett 
Frank L. Boyden 
Alden C. Brett 
Harry Dunlap Brown 
Grace A. Buxton 
William M. Cashin 
Dennis M. Crowley 



John J. Desmond 
John W. Haigis 
L. Roy Hawes 
Ernest Hoftyzer 
Elizabeth L. McNamara 
Lewis Perry 
Ralph F. Taber 



Philip F. Whitmore 



P.S. This report on the results of the mail ballot is sent 
to you for filing of your copies of minutes and 
actions of the Board. 



1805 




Q <7*>iAJL 



us€5><xnAXuou 



ecretary 



Chairman 



1806 



TRUSTEE 



Daily Depart- 
ment 



Milk 



Dairy Cattle 

Certification 

Service 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



December 7, 1954-* 12:15 p.m., Hotel Statler, Boston 



Chairman Bartlett presiding 



PRESENT: 



Trustees Bartlett, Boyden, Brett, 
Brown, Miss Buxton, Cashin, Crowley, 
Desmond, Haigis, Hawes, McDermott, 
Mrs. McNamara, Perry, Taber, Whitmore, 
Governor Herter, President Mather, 
Governor' s Secretary Mr. Stimpson, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Burke 



It was 



VOTED : To dispense with reading of the call and read- 
ing of the minutes of the last meeting. 

Trustee Brett reported on meeting of the Committee on 

Agriculture and Horticulture on November 3? 1954- and on the 

recommendation of this committee, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the University to obtain equip- 
ment and facilities for the Dairy Department 
necessary to bring the program up to par with 
the needs of the current instructional service. 

It was further 

VOTED : To authorize the University to obtain the 

milk processing equipment from the appropria- 
tion made by the Legislature for remodelling 
the dairy building and for improvements to 
f§rm buildings. This total amount is $14-5,000. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Agriculture and 

Horticulture, it was 

VOTED : To approve the following rates for dairy 

cattle certification effective January 1, 1955. 



Advanced Registry 



Up to 12 cows 3X or 
Up to 18 cows 2X 

1 string $27.00 
Additional strings 2^.00 



13 to 16 cows 3X or 
19 to 24 cows 2X 

$32.00 
29.00 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Herd Improvement Registry 



Up to 20 cows 3X or 
Up to 30 cows 2X 

1 string 

Additional strings 



$19.50 
17.00 



21 to 30 cows 3X or 
31 to 45 cows 2X 

$2^.50 
22.00 



Effective January 1, 1955 the charge for H. I. P. office 
fees for Massachusetts will be 5$ per cow per month with 
a minimum charge of $1.00 per herd per month. 

The rate for Special Check Tests after January 1, 1955 
will be: 



Up to 30 cows 2X or 20 cows 3X 
31 to 45 cows 2X or 21 to 30 cows 3X 
46 to 60 cows 2X or 31 to 40 cows 3X 
61 to 75 cows 2X or 41 to 50 cows 3X 



127.00 
32.00 
51.00 
56.00 



Trustee Whitmore reported on meeting of the Trustee 

Committee on Buildings and Grounds held on December 1, 1954 at the 

University. On the recommendation of this committee, it was 

VOTED : To rescind vote of May 1, 1951 locating 
the Public Health Building near the 
Dining Commons. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Buildings and 

Grounds, it was 

VOTED : To locate the Public Health Building south 
of Clark Hall as the first section of a 
Science Center for the University. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Buildings and 

Grounds, it was 

VOTED : To name the main Engineering Building 
"Engineering". 

It is understood that space will be reserved by the archi 

tect to make possible a personal memorialization later if it should 

be desired. 



1807 



Public 
Health 

Building 



Engineering 
Building 



1808 



TRUSTEE 



Arnold House 



Durfee 
Conservatory 



Draper Hall 



Leland, 
Allen S. 



Mottla, 
Gilbert E. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Buildings and 

Grounds, it was 

VOTED : To accept Arnold House as complete as 
of December 1, 1954-. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Buildings and 

Grounds, it was 

VOTED: To accept the Durfee Conservatory as com- 
plete on October 22, 1954 but with the 
understanding that cracks in the pool 
floor will be repaired and the exterior 
cement wall be scrubbed or brushed to re- 
move stains. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Buildings and 

Grounds, it was 

VOTED: To accept the renovation of Draper Hall 
as complete on December 1, 1954- with the 
stipulation that the contractor shall com- 
plete minor construction details such as 
painting of the basement corridor and com- 
pleting installation of baseboards. 

Trustee Boyden reported on meeting of the Trustee 

Committee on Faculty and Program of Study held in the Hotel Statler, 

December 7, 1954- and on the recommendation of this committee, it was| 

VOTED : To appoint Mr. Allen S. Leland as Extension 

Professor of Agriculture, calendar year basis, 
effective January 1, 1955 at annual salary of 
$7080 payable from Federal funds. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and Pro- 
gram of Study, it was 

VOTED: To appoint Mr. Gilbert E. Mottla as Head of 
the department of Communications, School of 
Agriculture and Horticulture, calendar year 
basis, effective February 1, 1955 at annual 
salary of $7680 payable from Federal funds, 
this appointment to be subject to final approval 
by the President after a personal interview with 
Mr. Mottla. 



fRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was 

VOTED : To name Charles Hiram Thayer, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Agronomy, Emeritus, effective on 
his retirement September 30, 1954- (after 35 
years of service) . 

To name Roland Hale Verbeck, Director of Short 
Courses, Emeritus, effective on his retirement 
September 30, 19 5 A (after 30 years of service) . 

To name Arthur Dunham Holmes, Research Pro- 
fessor of Chemistry, Emeritus, effective on 
his retirement July 31> 1954- (after 12 years 
of service) • 

To name Llewellyn Light Derby, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Physical Education, Emeritus, 
effective on his retirement September 30, 1954- 
(after 33 years of service) . 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was 

VOTED : To approve the following new courses and 
changes in course: 

1. Change Civil Engineering 55 - Highway Engineering 

to CIVIL ENGINEERING 55 (I) TRANSPORTATION ENGINEER- 
ING. 

Transportation systems, elements of railroad, high- 
way, traffic and airport engineering. Route loca- 
tion and elementary intersection design. 
Two class hours; 1 3-hour laboratory period. 
Prerequisite, C. E. 30 Credit, 3 

2. New course Civil Engineering 9B (II) ADVANCED TRANS- 
PORTATION ENGINEERING. 

Analysis of the engineering aspects of traffic 
problems such as traffic signal design, street 
capacities, parking and channelization. 
Two class hours; 1 3-hour laboratory period. 
Prerequisite, C.E. 55 Credit, 3 

3. New course Botany 69. FOREST AND SHADE TREE PATHOLOGY. 

Nature, cause and control of the principal types of 
disease in trees, including decay of forest products, 



1809 



Thayer, 
Charles H. 



Verbeck, 

Roland H. 



Holmes, 
Arthur D. 



Derby, 
Llewellyn L, 



New 
Courses 



1810 



TRUSTEE 



Business 

Admi ni s t ra ti on 

Curriculum 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



standing and structural timber; insects and en- 
vironment in relation to fungi and disease de- 
velopment; morphology and identification of 
fungi that induce disease or decay in trees. 
2 class hours 1 3-hour laboratory* Credit, 3 

4.. New course OFFICE PROCEDURES 1(1). 

This course provides instruction and laboratory 
practice in office organization and procedures 
and the operation of office machines. 
1 class hour, U 1-hour laboratory periods. Credit, 3 

5. New course OFFICE PROCEDURES II (II). 

A continuation of Office Procedures I, including 
the use of systems and records as managerial aids 
in the business office. 
1 class hour, 4. 1-hour laboratory periods. Credit, 3 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was 

VOTED : To approve the following program in the School 
of Business Administration entitled "Management 
Training". This program is designed to provide 
basic training in the various aspects of busi- 
ness management* 

FRESHMAN AND SOPHOMORE YEARS 

In the first two years the student will normally 
enroll in the College of Arts and Science. 

The Faculty of the School is more concerned with 
scholarship and promise of development than with the 
precise content of the courses which the prospective 
student offers for admission to the program. 



JUNIOR YEAR 



First Semester 



Second Semester 



Acct. 25, Intro, to Acct. I 3 
Office Procedures I 3 
Fin. 55, Financial Insti. 3 
Mkt. 53, Marketing Prin. 3 
Elective 

15 



Acct. 26, Intro, to Acct. II 3 
Office Procedures II 3 
Mkt. 62, Market Research 3 
Ec. 56, Bus. Fluctuations 3 
Elective 3 

15 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



SENIOR YEAR 



RUSTEE 



I. A. 63, Mgt. in Industry 3 
B.L. 70, Business Law I 3 
Stat. 79, Elem. of Statistics 
Elective in Business 3 
Elective 3 

15 



I. A. 64., Personnel Mgt. 
Fin. 76, Insurance 
Soc. 68, Ind. Sociology 
Elective in Business 
Elective 



3 
3 
3 
3 

15 



was 



On the recommendation of the President and Treasurer, it 



VOTED ; To establish a fee of $5.00 per semester for 
the one-half day per week of the Nursery 
School. 



On the recommendation of the President and Treasurer, 



it was 



1811 



Nursery 
School 



VOTED ; To authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth ¥. Johnson, 
to sign negotiated Contract No. 600 s-p-37693 
with the Navy Purchasing Office, Department of 
the Navy, for education and training of naval 
personnel. 

On the recommendation of the President and Treasurer, 



it was 



VOTED ; To authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth V. Johnson, 
to discharge the mortgage, dated September 12, 
194.6, on The Springfield House Association of 
Kappa Kappa Gamma as recorded in the Hampshire 
Registry of Deeds, Book 1008, Page 346, since 
the mortgage note has been paid in full. 

On the recommendation of the President and Treasurer, 



it was 



VOTED ; To authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth V. Johnson, 
to subscribe to 33 shares of Virginia Electric 
and Power Company Common using 330 rights held 
in the name of the Trustees and to sell the re- 
maining 7 rights. 



Navy Depart- 
ment Contract 



Kappa Kappa 
Gamma 



Stock 



1812 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Governor Herter expressed his regrets that he had been 
unable to attend the preceding portion of the meeting and invited 
the Trustees to discuss any phase of the University. 

President Mather expressed his appreciation to the 
Governor for his long range vision in matters affecting the Univer- 
sity and for his help and encouragement in planning for the future. 

The President said it will be the aim of his administra- 
tion to cooperate with state commissions and especially with the 
Governor's commission on fiscal policy. It is necessary, he said, 
to relate the thinking of the University to that of other educa- 
tional departments of the Commonwealth. H~e felt that much could 
be accomplished if the State Department of Education and the Uni- 
versity might work more closely in fiscal matters rather than 
appear as competing bodies before the Legislature. The State De- 
partment and the University should also work closely in the train- 
ing of teachers needed in the elementary and high schools of the 
state. 

President Mather called attention to projected enrollment 
estimates for the period 195-4-1965 (see attached). These figures 
have been refined since the board meeting of July ±Uy 1954 at which 
time it was estimated that the University would have an enrollment 
of 10,000 students in 1961. The current figures show an estimated 
10,000 students in 1965. The nation-wide estimate of college en- 
rollment in 1965 is two and one-half times present enrollment. 



? 



resent enrollment at the University is somewhat over 4.,000, out of 



a college age population in Massachusetts of 227,000. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

In 1965, the President said, the college age population 
in Massachusetts will be 337,000 - approximately a 50$ increase. 
The state university, however, will need to expand much more than 
50$ because the private colleges have stated that they cannot take 
a proportionate share of this increase. At the present time 93% 
of college students in Massachusetts are attending private colleges 
Forty percent or the 26,000 of the students in Massachusetts 
colleges are from out of state. At the same time 18,000 Massachu- 
setts young men and women are going out of the state to obtain a 
college education. More Massachusetts students are attending 
publicly supported colleges outside the state than in. 

President Mather said there has been some discussion of 
state scholarships for students at private colleges. However, 
this will not solve the problem as the private colleges are using 
their facilities to the limit at the present time. To enable them 
to take more students, scholarships would have to be large enough 
to provide for capital outlay for new buildings. It would be less 
expensive for the state to build additional facilities itself. 
Furthermore, it is doubtful if private colleges would accept 
necessary controls that would go with this size scholarship. 

President father emphasized that the present quality of 
instruction must be maintained in the future growth of the Univer- 
sity. Additional students cannot be admitted without additional 
facilities and staff. He pointed out that in addition to popula- 
tion increases, a larger percentage of high school graduates are 
going on for higher education. 



1813 



1814 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Trustees discussed with the Governor the proposed 
capital outlay program for the University for the years 1956 
through I960, totaling $27,950,000 from State funds and $7,400,000 
from University of Massachusetts Building Association funds, (see 
attached schedule) . 

The Trustees next reviewed estimated operating budgets 
for the next ten fiscal years beginning with the budget of 
$7,4.38,603 fo r "the fiscal year ending June 30, 1957, based on esti- 
mated student enrollment of 4-*600, and ending with the budget of 
$14, 24-9*531 for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1966 based on esti- 
mated student enrollment of 10,000. 

President Mather called attention to the Boarding Hall 
appropriation and to its offsetting revenue. In the current year, 
$750,000 of the University budget is for this item alone. By 1965 
with 10,000 students, the Boarding Hall appropriation would be 
$2,300,000. He said that University officers have discussed this 
appropriation with the Budget Commissioner and with the Budget 
Director of the Ways and Means Committee to see whether the Board- 
ing Hall operation might be established as a revolving fund so that 
it will not be necessary for the Commonwealth to appropriate for the 
Boarding Hall each year. The President pointed out that the 
Athletic funds and Student Activities funds are now operated as re- 
volving funds and the new Student Union Building will be so 
operated under section 5A of Chapter 75. 

Governor Herter said that he doubted that it would be de- 
sirable to attempt to establish the operation of the Boarding Hall 



1815 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

as a revolving fund enterprise. Many departments of the Common- 
wealth are revenue producing and any effort to set up separate 
funds for these individual operations would complicate the state 
budget and fiscal procedures. However, the Governor suggested 
that attention should be called prominently in budgets of the Uni- 
versity to the income resulting from operations so that the Legis- 
lature and the public will be aware of the net cost of operation of 
the University as against the gross appropriation. 

The Governor said that his fiscal survey commission will 
release its preliminary report on Saturday of this week on certain 
problems of education. The Teachers Colleges, he said, are ex- 
ploring the problem involved in doubling their enrollments. He 
said that the commission has accepted the projections of the Uni- 
versity for expansion over the next ten years. However, the fiscal 
outlook of the Commonwealth is not encouraging as there are many 
heavy commitments upon the financial structure in addition to 
problems of education. 

The Trustees discussed the proposed Fisheries School and 
President Mather said that he hopes to obtain support from the 
Federal Government for development of this school. 

Governor Herter spoke of the problem of Federal funds used 
to support state programs and especially of the impact of Federal 
programs on University financial operations. He cited one univer- 
sity, not in the Commonwealth, which has undertaken government con- 
tract work far in excess of its normal operating budget. Some of 
the University professors who are on tenure have been transferred 

to the Federal programs and their positions on the University staff 



Funds 



1816 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

filled behind them. This University is now faced with the problem 
of withdrawal of Federal funds and may be left with commitments to 
its staff in excess of its budget. Harvard University has adopted 
a policy of not putting men on tenure on Federal funds. 

President Mather pointed out that the University of 
Massachusetts has been more fortunate in its relations to the 
Federal Government and its use of Federal funds. The University 
has undertaken very few contract projects with the Federal Govern- 
ment but receives most of its Federal funds as grants in aid under 
programs established in the 1800's. In no instance have these 
funds been reduced in amount and in most instances they have been 
increased through the years. 

The President said that the New England School of 



Pharmacy has requested the University of Massachusetts to take 
over its operations. He does not feel that this should be done 
but that any consideration of a School of Pharmacy should be in 
connection with the possible development of a medical school in 
future years. 

Governor Herter pointed out that as a result of the re- 
port of Senator Evans recess commission on medical schools, there 
is developing a New England compact which would make the problem of 
building or supporting a medical school a New England-wide problem 
rather than a Massachusetts problem. 

After the Governor left the meeting, there was further 
discussion of the expansion program as specifically outlined in 
the attached student enrollment projections, the attached capital 
outlay program, and the attached estimated budgets, and it was 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



1817 



RUSTEE 



VOTED: That the policy of expansion of the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts based on the projection 
of student enrollments to 10,000 by 1965 be 
adopted in so far as future appropriations 
for new buildings and maintenance are adequate 
to provide for this growth. 



The meeting was adjourned et 3:15 p«ni. 




hA*. 



vJ\"5 ^s^/GLcU^ 



ecretary 



Chairman 






1818 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
PROJECTED ENROLLMENT ESTIMATES 1954-1965 



August 24, 195/ 













Total 






























Fall 

Semester 

of 


Remarks 


Total 
University 
Enroll. 


Graduate 
School 


Stock- 
bridge 
School 


Under- 

Graduate 

Enroll. 


Undergraduate 
Total Total 
Men Women 


Men 


Seniors 
Women 


Total 


Men 


Juniors 
Women 


Total 


Men 


Sophomores 
Women 


Total 


Men 


Freshmen 
Women 


Total 


1950 


Inc. 27 Spec. Students 


3,524 


310 


438 


2,776 


1,989 


787 


539 


115 


654 


464 


146 


610 


438 


200 


638 


539 


308 


847 


1951 


Inc. 60 Spec. Students 


3,616 


293 


308 


3,015 


1,969 


1,046 


400 


137 


537 


426 


199 


625 


469 


279 


748 


639 


406 


1,045 


1952 


Inc. 27 Spec. Students 


3,791 


274 


294 


3,223 


2,048 


1,175 


380 


184 


564 


440 


241 


681 


543 


332 


875 


669 


407 


1,076 


1953 


Inc. 31 Spec. Students 


4,091 


310 


263 


3,518 


2,283 


1,235 


375 


223 


598 


504 


276 


780 


/ 
634 


305 


939 


754 


416 


1,170 


1954 


(Omitted February Class) 


4,145 


290 


255 


3,600 


2,403 


1,197 


464 


254 


718 


571 


260 


831 


664 


333 


997 


704 


350 


1,054 


1955 




4,145 


290 


255 


3,600 


2,448 


1,152 


525 


239 


764 


598 


283 


881 


620 


280 


900 


705 


350 


1,055 


1956 


(Increase women to fill 
existing dormitories.) 


4,600 


320 


280 


4,000 


2,600 


1,400 


550 


260 


810 


558 


238 


796 


620 


280 


900 


872 


622 


1,494 


1957 




4,900 


320 


280 


4,300 


2,745 


1,555 


513 


219 


732 


558 


238 


796 


777 


498 


1,275 


897 


600 


1,497 


1958 




5,350 


350 


300 


4,700 


2,961 


1,739 


513 


219 


732 


699 


423 


1,122 


789 


430 


1,269 


960 


617 


1,577 


1959 




6,150 


350 


300 


5,500 


3,398 


2,102 


643 


389 


1,032 


710 


408 


1,118 


845 


494 


1,339 


1,200 


811 


2,011 


1960 




7,000 


380 


320 


6,300 


3,869 


2,431 


653 


375 


1,028 


760 


420 


1,180 


1,056 


649 


1,705 


1,400 


987 


2,387 


1961 




7,700 


380 


320 


7,000 


4,281 


2,719 


699 


386 


1,085 


950 


552 


1,502 


1,232 


790 


2,022 


1,400 


991 


2,391 


1962 




8,350 


400 


350 


7,600 


4,615 


2,985 


874 


508 


1,382 


1,109 


671 


1,780 


1,232 


793 


2,025 


1,400 


1,013 


2,413 


1963 




8,880 


430 


350 


8,100 


4,911 


3,189 


1,020 


617 


1,637 


1,109 


674 


1,783 


1,232 


810 


2,042 


1,550 


1,088 


2,638 


1964 




9,410 


460 


350 


8,600 


5,193 


3,407 


1,020 


620 


1,640 


1,109 


688 


1,797 


1,364 


870 


2,234 


1,700 


1,229 


2,929 


1965 




10,000 


500 


350 


9,150 


5,544 


3,606 


1,020 


633 


1,653 


1,228 


739 


1,967 


1,496 


983 


2,479 


1,800 


1,251 


3,051 



Rates of Attrition: 



MEN — 12% Freshman to Sophomore 
10% Sophomore to Junior 
8% Junior to Senior 



WOMEN - 20% Freshman to Sophomore 
15% Sophomore to Junior 
8% Junior to Senior 



1818 



university of massachusetts 

Capital outlay program 
five-year program for fiscal years 1956-1960 

REVISED AUGUST 25, 1954 TT . - M ac 

Univ. of Mass . 

Bldg. Assoc. 
Priority Project State Funds Fund 

1956 

1. { Addition to Library (#1)* {.2, 000, 000 # 
( Liberal Arts Classroom Bldg? 2,000,000 

2. Addition to Power Plant 1,000,000 

(Including Boilers, 
Generators & Utility 
Additions, etc.) 

3. Vegetable Gardening Bldg. & 250,000 

Greenhouses 

4. Completion of Dormitory #13 600,000 

for 231 Men 

5. Dormitory #14 for 400 Men 1,000,000 

$5,250,000 $1, 600, 000 



^Because of the close physical relationship of these two projects, 
they should be studied together and, if architecturally desirable, 
might be constructed as adjoining buildings. 



The Projects for 1957-1960 are 
subject to further study. 



1957 



1. Science Building (Bio- $3,500,000 

logical Sciences, Geology, 
Botany, etc. ) 

2. General Maintenance & Garage 

Bldg. for Plant 500,000 

3. Addition to Food Technology 500,000 

4. Cold Storage Laboratory 250,000 

(replace Fisher) 

5. Infirmary 1,000,000 

6. Dorm. #15 for 155 Women 350,000 

7. 1st. Part of Dorm. #16 350,000 

for 145 Men 



Total $5,750,000 ■ ,700, 000 



CAPITAL OUTLAY PROGRAM - Page 2 



Priority 



Project 



State Funds 



1. 

2. 

3. 

4. 
5. 
6. 

7. 
d. 
9. 



1. 
2. 

3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 

7. 



1. 
2. 

3. 

4. 
5. 

6. 

7. 



1956 



Natural Resources Building 
School of Education and 

Practice School Building 
Adds. & Impts. to Utilities 
Poultry Lab* & ^lant Buildings 
ROTC Armory and Classrooms 
Engineering Shops 
Physical Education Playing Fields 
Complete Dorm #16 for 216 Men 
Dorm. #17 for 164 Women 



£1,000,000 
1,500,000 

300,000 
100,000 
500,000 
600 , 000 
150,000 



Total 

1959 

Addition to Dining Commons 
Addition to Physics Building 
Engineering Building 
Gymnasium, Phys. Ed. for Men 
Animal Industries Building 
Dorm. #16 for 437 Men 
Dorms. #19 & #20 for 363 Women 



Total 



I960 



Business Admin. Classroom Bldg. 
Horticulture & /gronomy Labs. 
Administration Building 
Auditorium & Music Center 
Farm Building Replacements 
Dorm. #21 for 471 Men 
Dorm. #22 for 329 Women 



$5, 300,000 



$1,000,000 
1,500,000 
1,000,000 

3,000,000 
500,000 



Notes: 



Univ. of Mass 

Bldg. Assoc. 

Funds 



* 



550,000 
450,000 



§4,150,000 $ 1,000,000 



$ 750,000 
1,250,000 
1,500,000 
1,500,000 

600,000 

1,100,000 

900,000 



£2,000,000 



V 



1,250,000 
650,000 



Total £7,000,000 $2,100,000 

TOTAL - FIVE-YEAR PROGRAM $27,950,000 &7, 400, 000 



1. All project estimates include 
ments, architects 1 fees and other 
mates are subject to change based 
tects and engineers 1 studies. 

2. All buildings are based on nee 
of enrollments revised to conform 
These enrollment figures show that 
fiscal year indicated to complete 
body reaches the size where existi 



furnishings, equipment, site improve- 
costs of the project. These esti- 
upon cost estimates made by archi- 

ds established by projected estimates 
to a gradual growth of the University 

an appropriation is needed in the 
the building for use as the student 
ng space is overcrowded e 



9/17/54 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
February 14, 1955, 12:30 p.m., Statler Hotel, Boston, Mass. 



PRESENT: 



Chairman Bartlett presiding 

His Excellency Governor Herter, 
Trustees Bartlett, Boyden, Brett, 
Brown, Miss Buxton, Crowley, 
Desmond, Haigis, Hawes, McDermott, 
Mrs. McNamara, Taber, Whitmore, 
Mr. Harry Stimpson, Governors 
Secretary, President Mather, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Burke 



It was 



1819 



VOTED : To dispense with reading of the call and with 
reading of the minutes of the last meeting. 

Chairman Bartlett appointed the following Nominating 
Committee to recommend officers and committee members for the 
coming year: Trustee "Whitmore, Chairman, Trustees Brett and Crowley. 

Chairman Boyden reported for the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study which met at 11:00 a.m. this same day and on the 

recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and Program of Study, 

it was 

VOTED : To approve the attached report of personnel 
changes during 1954. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was 

VOTED : To approve the promotion of Dr. Carl S. Roys 

from Professor to Head of the Electrical Engi- 
neering Department effective September 1, 1954- 
and to approve the promotion of Donald P. Allan 
from Associate Professor to Professor, with 
catalogue title of Administrative Assistant to 
the Dean and Directors of the School of Agri- 
culture, effective February 15, 1955. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was 



Nominating 
Committee 



Personnel 

Changes 



Promotion of 
Carl S. Roys 

Promotion of 
Donald P. Allaa 



1820 



Wilbur H. Thies 

Emeritus 

Professor 



TRUSTEE 



Sabbatical 
Leaves 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED ; To name Wilbur H. Thies, Emeritus Professor 
of Pomology, effective on his retirement 
January 31 > 1955 • 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was 

VOTED : To approve the following sabbatical leaves 
subject to availability of funds and the 
usual conditions governing sabbatical 
leaves. 

1. Lawrence M. Bartlett, Associate Professor of Zoology, 
for one semester at full pay beginning February of 
1956, to study Avian Anatomy with Dr. Harvey I. 
Fisher at the University of Illinois. 

2. James M. Ferrigno , Associate Professor of Romance 
Languages, for one year at half pay beginning 
September 1, 195 5 t to spend the year in Italy and 
Spain continuing his investigation of the influence 
of Spanish on southern Italian dialects. 

3. Robert A. Fitzpa trick, Assistant Professor (research) 
of Agricultural Economics, for one semester at full 
pay beginning September of 1955 j to complete the 
course requirements for the doctorate in Agricultural 
Economics at Purdue University. 

4-» John F. Hanson, Associate Professor of Entomology, 
for one semester at full pay beginning February of 
1956, for collection and study of Stone Flies of the 
Eastern Seaboard. 

5. Vernon P. Helming, Professor of English, for one year 
at half pay beginning September 1, 1955 > to continue 
research into the Christian Pilgrimage as a popular 
custom and the uses of it by medieval writers. 

6. Helen S. Mitchell, Dean of the School of Home Economics, 
for one semester at full pay beginning September 1, 
1955, to audit courses at Harvard in the field of 
Public Administration and Nutrition and to observe 

some of the nutrition programs being conducted by the 
food and agriculture program in Rome and the Near East. 

7. Charles F. Oliver , Assistant Professor of Education, 
for one semester at full pay beginning September 1, 
1955, to work on doctoral program in the School of 
Education at the University of Connecticut. 



USTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



8. Robert L. Pi. vers , Assistant Professor of Business 
Administration, for one semester at full pay be- 
ginning February 1, 1956, to complete doctorate study 
at the University of Illinois. 

9. Walter W. Smith , Assistant Professor of Electrical 
Engineering, for one year at half pay beginning 
September 1, 1955 > to study for the Master of Science 
degree in television at Syracuse University, 

10. Franklin W. Southwick , Professor (research) of Pomology, 
for one semester at full pay beginning February 1, 1956, 
for study of Pomology at the State Agricultural College 
at Davis, California, and in Oregon and Washington. 

11. Anthony W. Zaitz, Assistant Professor of Speech, for 
one year at half pay beginning September 1, 195 5 > for 
work toward the degree Doctor of Philosophy in Speech 
at the University of Wisconsin. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 



Program of Study, it was 

VOTED ; To approve changes in the course of study 
in accordance with the following schedule. 

(1) That Philosophy 61 and Philosophy 267 be discontinued and that 
two new courses in Philosophy be approved as follows: 

PHILOSOPHY 25 (I and II) INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY 

A study of the distinctive role of philosophy in its 
relations to the insights of science, religion, and 
art. The student is introduced to some of the general 
questions, ideas, theories, and methods of inquiry 
which have given direction to Western thought, and 
encouraged to clarify and examine his own ideas re- 
garding knowledge, reality, and value. 

(credit 3) 

PHILOSOPHY 74- (II) ORIENTAL PHILOSOPHIES 

A study of the present conflict in ideologies within 
and between the leading cultures of Asia, understood 
in the light of their Philosophical history. The 
bearing of philosophical differences between East 
and West on the problem of mutual understanding. 

(credit 3) 



1821 



New Courses 



1822 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



(2) That History 65, 66, 77 and 78 be discontinued and that two 
new courses in History be approved as follows: 

HISTORY 71 (I) MAIN CURRENTS IN ENGLISH THOUGHT 
(1600-1690) 

Main currents in English Thought, 1600-1690. A study 
of intellectual movements and their relation to 
political, religious, economic and social developments. 
3 class hours (credit 3) 

HISTORY 74 (II) AGE OF REFORMATION 

Age of the Reformation. A study of the religious 
changes, and the accompanying political upheavals, 
social, economic and cultural developments in 16th 
and 17th Century Europe. (credit 3) 

(3) That the following new courses in Mathematics be approved: 

MATHEMATICS 64. (II) STATISTICS 

A continuation of Mathematics 63, including a study 

of the joint distribution of two or more random 

variables; the chi-squared, t-, and F-distributions 

and their applications; and techniques which do not 

involve an assumption about the form of the basic 

distribution. 

Prerequisite, Mathematics 63, 91. (credit 3) 

MATHEMATICS 95-96 READINGS 

A reading course in advanced theoretical topics. For 
gifted senior only. The course is intended to furnish 
a student further preparation for graduate work in 
Mathematics. Topics may be chosen from the fields of 
algebra, analysis, geometry or applied Mathematics. 
Prerequisite, permission of the Department Head 

(credit 3) 

(4.) That Landscape Architecture 87 be expanded to Landscape 
Architecture 87 and 88 as follows: 

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 87 (I) CITY PLANNING 

Field surveys covering existing conditions, tabulation 
and analysis of information obtained in such surveys, 
preparation of land-use maps and supplementary material. 
Prerequisite, Landscape Architecture 86 (credit 3) 



JUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE && (II) CITY PLANNING 

Redevelopment projects and proposals based on studies 
made in Landscape Architecture 87 plus problems in 
the design of various urban areas. 
Prerequisite, Landscape Architecture 87 (credit 3) 

(5) That the following new courses in Home Economics be approved: 

HOME ECONOMICS 86 S WORKSHOP IN RECENT DEVELOPMENTS 
IN TEXTILES 

This course is a concentrated study of recent de- 
velopments in the field of textiles. Class and 
laboratory instruction will include the characteristics 
and properties of the thermoplastic, protein, cellulose 
and mineral fibers (natural and synthetic): blends; 
fabric finishes and fabric care. Some field trips are 
an important phase of the work. Prerequisites: Home 
Economics 26 or its equivalent. (credit 3) 

HOME ECONOMICS 94- S WORKSHOP IN FOODS 

An intensive three weeks course dealing with the 
planning and preparation of family meals. Con- 
sideration will be given to new products, cost levels, 
new trends toward international foods, and out-door 
cookery. Designed for home economics teachers and 
others with a background knowledge of scientific food 
preparation. Prerequisite: Home Economics 30 or its 
equivalent. (Limited to 16 students.) (credit 3) 

(6) At present Mechanical Engineering 64. and Mechanical Engi- 
neering 81 are offered to both majors and non-majors. It 
is recommended that separate courses for non-majors be 
established as follows: 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 61 HEAT POWER (non Mechanical 
Engineering majors) 

A one semester terminal course designed to present 
to the student the fundamental principles involved 
in the production of power. It consists of the basic 
theory underlying the field of thermo-dynamics and 
its application to power machinery. It includes a 
study of gases, vapors, thermodynamic processes, 
cycles and power measurement with considerable 
discussion, both quantitive and qualitive, of the 
application of the above to gasoline engines, diesel 
engines, gas turbines, steam turbines, and com- 



._ 



1823 



pressors. 

3 class hours 

Prerequisites - Physics 28, Math 6 



(credit 3) 
(The Department) 



1824 



TRUSTEE 



Agricultural 
Engineering 



Positions of 
Provost and 
Dean of Arts 
and Sciences 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 81 EXPERIMENTAL MECHANICAL 
ENGINEERING (non Mechanical Engineering majors) 

Calibration and application of instruments used in 
the testing of mechanical engineering apparatus. Per- 
formance tests on mechanical engineering equipment 
such as internal combustion engines, steam power 
apparatus, refrigeration machines, and fans and 
blowers. 

2 3-hour laboratory periods. (credit 2) 

Prerequisites - M.E. 66; C.E. 75 con- 
currently. (The Department) 

(7) It is recommended that the title and description of Economics 
70, Monopolies, be changed as follows: 

ECONOMICS 70 THE STRUCTURE OF AMERICAN INDUSTRY 

A study of enterprise, market competition and economic 
development in American industries. (credit 3) 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was 

VOTED : To approve discontinuance of the degree Bachelor 
of Science in Agricultural Engineering and to 
transfer the remaining functions of the Depart- 
ment of Agricultural Engineering from the School 
of Engineering to the School of Agriculture. 

Chairman Bartlett asked the President about progress in 
filling the positions of Provost and Dean of Arts and Sciences. 

President Mather said that he had formed two committees 
of the faculty to seek candidates beginning in September of 1954-* 
Availability of the positions has been made known from coast to 
coast and a list of 80 candidates for the position of Provost was 
assembled. Approximately 1/3 of the 80 were eliminated because 
the salary of $10,380 was too low for their consideration. An out- 
standing candidate was interviewed in January by the Educational 
Policies Council, by the committee, by school deans and others and 
was to have been nominated at the meeting today. However, his 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

salary has just been raised to $14,300 per year and he has with- 
drawn his candidacy. The committee will now return to the con- 
sideration of others on the list. 

For the position of Dean of Arts and Sciences, the be- 
ginning salary is $8,580. It has been extremely difficult to in- 
terest competent and qualified men in this position because of the 
salary. Heads of departments in many universities receive more 
than the dean of a school at the University of Massachusetts. 
The position has gone unfilled for about four years largely be- 
cause of the salary limitation. After consideration, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Chairman of the Board and 
two trustees to be selected by the Chairman 
to act as a committee with the President of 
the University, empowered to offer the posi- 
tions of Dean of Arts and Sciences and 
Provost when suitable candidates are lo- 
cated. 

President Mather reported that the University Committee 
on Honorary Degrees, of which he is chairman, has been meeting 
during the past month to consider candidates for honorary degrees 
at the June commencement. A large number of candidates were re- 
viewed and recommendations of the alumni committee on honorary 
degrees were considered. The President then presented the names 
and career outlines of the five candidates selected by the Uni- 
versity committee. After review of the individuals, it was 

VOTED ; To award honorary degrees as listed in the 
files of the Secretary at the June 1955 
commencement with the understanding that 
the recipients must be present in person to re- 
ceive the award. 

President Mather presented his annual report for 1954- 

and it was 



1825 



Honorary 

Degrees 



1826 



Annual 
Report 



TRUSTEE 



Committees 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To accept the report as presented. 

Governor Herter expressed his regrets that he was unable 
to remain for the balance of the meeting because of pressing en- 
gagements. 

Trustee Whitmore reported for the Nominating Committee and 

it was unanimously 

VOTED ; To elect the following slate of officers 

and committee members for the ensuing year: 



President, Christian A. Herter 
Chairman, Joseph ¥. Bartlett 
Secretary, James W. Burke 
Treasurer, Kenneth V. Johnson 

Committee on Faculty and Program of Study 

Frank L. Boyden, Chairman John J. Desmond 

Grace A. Buxton Mrs. Elizabeth L. McNamara 

Dennis Crowley Lewis Perry 

Committee on Agriculture and Horticulture 

Alden C. Brett, Chairman L. Roy Hawes 
Harry D. ^rown Ernest Hoftyzer 

Dennis M. Crowley Philip F. Whitmore 






Committee on Buildings and Grounds 
Philip F. Whitmore, Chairman 
Alden C. Brett 
John W. Haigis 

Comm ittee on Finance 

John W. Haigis, Chairman 
Alden C. Brett 
William M. Cashin 



F. Roland McDermott 
Ralph F. Taber 



F. Roland McDermott 
Philip F. Whitmore 



Committee on Recognized Student Activities 

Frank L. Boyden, Chairman Dennis M. Crowley 
Harry D. Brown Ernest Hoftyzer 

Grace A. Buxton Ralph F. Taber 



Committee on Legislation 

William M. Cashin, Chairman 
Harry D. ^rown 
John W. Haigis 

Executive Committee 

Joseph W. Bartlett, Chairman 

Frank L. Boyden 
Alden C. Brett 



Mrs. Elizabeth L. McNamara 
Ralph F. Taber 



William M. Cashin 
Philip F. Whitmore 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Mather reported that the University has re- 
cently received a gift of 22 registered Guernsey cattle from 
Mr. Weston Rowland of Boston. This is one of the outstanding 
Guernsey herds in the country. The University's present herd of 
Guernseys will be culled to keep the number of cattle from in- 
creasing beyond normal capacity. 

The President also reported that the number of Morgan 
horses kept by the University has been reduced from 22 to 10. All 
the blue ribbon horses have been retained. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that the Director of the 
Division of Building Construction has conferred with him relative 
to architects recommended by the Trustees for the Library addi- 
tion. All three architectural firms named by the Trustees are 
overloaded with projects at the present time and the Director of 
the Division of Building Construction recommended that the Trustee 
select another firm for the Library addition. The name of Ames, 
Childs and Graves of Boston has been suggested. After 
discussion, it was 

VOTED: To substitute the firm of Ames, Childs and 
Graves of Boston for Perry, Shaw, Hepburn, 
Kehoe and Dean in the list of architects 
named by the Trustees for planning the addi- 
tion to the University Library. 

On the recommendation of the Trustees and the President, 



it was 



VOTED : To tear down the Powers 1 House next to the 

Mathematics Building as soon as the heirs of 
Miss Powers remove her personal property since 
this building is not suitable for University 
use and is in such poor condition that any ex- 
penditure to repair it could not be justified. 



1827 



Gift of 

Guernsey 

herd 



Morgan 
horses 



Architect - 
Ames, Childs 
and Graves - 
for Library 



Powers 
property 



1828 



TRUSTEE 



Military 
Uniform 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



On the recommendation of the Trustees and the President, 



it was 



General 

Electric 

Educational 

and 

Charitable 

Fund 



VOTED ; To establish a Military Uniform Deposit 

of $30.00 for each Freshman and Sophomore 
enrolled in the Basic Course ROTC 
effective immediately on the following 
basis: 

1. Each -freshman to make a $30.00 Military 
Uniform Deposit at the time he pays the 
first semester bill. 

2. Charges for loss or damage of the govern- 
ment-issued uniforms will be deducted from 
this deposit. 

3. Should the amount on deposit drop below 
$20.00 because of charges, the student 
will be required to make additional de- 
posit to restore the balance to $30.00. 

4.. The deposit will be refunded to the stu- 
dent less any charges after clearance 
from the Air Force or the Army after the 
student has completed the requirements 
of the Basic Course, has been excused 
from the course, or left the University, 
whichever may occur first. 

On the recommendation of the Trustees and the President, 



it was 



VOTED: To use the gifts or grants from the General 
Electric Educational and Charitable Fund, 
Corporate Alumnus Program, as follows: 

1. Gifts that result from matching gifts 
for scholarships shall be used for 
scholarships in the same College, School, 
or Division as the original gift 
specified. 

2. Gifts that match unrestricted gifts to 
the University shall be added to the un- 
restricted trust funds of the University. 

On the recommendation of the Trustees and the President, 



it was 



mVffiB&fl OF HASSACHHSEETS 
Airiherst, Massachusetts 

3&gt of Professional Appointments, Promotions^ Hetiremants, resignations 

January I - December 31, 1954. 

TOT APPOItmraTS 

Pabert J* Allio, Instructor in Mechanical Engineering , September 1 
Jobn H, Anderson, Assistant Professor of Business Administration* September 1 
John H e Baker , Assistant Professor of Food Technology, September X 
Louie EU Baker, Assistant Professor of Ania&l Easaandry,, September 1 
Frank 3V Bartlett, Jr., Instructor in Animal Husbandry 3 September 1 
James S. Bosoo, Instructor in Physical Education, September i 
Willis® N. Boyor, Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering, September 1 
Qsrard Braunthal, Instructor in GoverBment, September 1 
Richard W* Butler * Instructor in Mechanical Engineering, September 1 
as Cars&ehafsl, Instructor in Philosophy , September 1 
lis A. Garpino, Instructor in Chemistry, September 1, for half time 
fteleolm Ghlsholm, Assistant Biysleiafe, November 1 

Krs. Esther S. fiXmp 3 Instructor in Music, September 1, for 2/3 time for 1st semester 
Edvaxd Clifford, Instructor in Psychology* September 1 
Jack F* Davis, Assistant Professor of Riysicel Education, September 1 
Bobert W» Day, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering* September 1 
William n a Bietel, Instructor in History, September 1 
Gsllestrlna T, MHaggio, Instructor in Nursing, September 1 
Urs. Alice H, Epstein, Sistructor in Mathematics, September 1 
Arthur J. Field, Instructor in Sociology^ September 1 
John G e Fisher* Instructor in Geology, September 1, for 1st semester 
William Footrlek, Associate Professor of Physical Education, October X 
Charles F e Fraker, Jr., Instructor in Bomane© Languages, September 1 
Biehard F 8 Garber, Instructor in Physical Education, September 1 
Hary E, C?ilreor®, Associate Professor of Nursing, September 1 
E^a H* Grubler, Instructor in Psychology, September 1 

ZAvrsnoe C. H&ekamaek, Assistant Professor of Business Administration, Sept, 1 
Robin D e S. Higham, Instructor in History * September 1 
Albert S» Kill, Instructor in History, September 1 

Allen W, Hixon, Jr. , Instructor in landscape Architecture, Sept* 1, for 1st semester 
Alexander Hull, Jr., Instructor in French, Sejfc ember 1 

Mrs* Catherine \h Xrvln 5 Instructor in Home Economics, Sept* 1, for 1/2 time 
Eandolph A, Jester* Instructor in Floriculture, September 
Edwin H a Ketchledge, Instructor in Botany, September 1 
Arnold B. Levitt , Instructor in Chemistry , September 1 
Mrs, Jane. F, MoCullou# e Assistant Professor of Home Economies^ Sept. 1 
Mary E M&edonald, Associate Professor of Hursing, September 1 
Earl J, McKaorter, Instructor in Chemistry , September 1 
(Center h\- Katters&orff , Instructor in Economics s September 1 
Guy E a Kermier 5 Instructor .In Romance Languages, September 1 
John H a Mitchell* Assistant Professor of English^ September 1 
Donald S, Navel, Instructor in Civil Engineering, , September 1, for 1/2 time 



25«w Appointments - Instruction -2 

Donald J. Olson, Instructor in History* September 1 

John G 8 Nicholson, Instructor in Physics, September 1 

Sally Ann OgllFis, Instructor in Faygical Education for Women, Sept, 1 

Helen F* O'Leary, Assistant Professor of Education, February 1 

Eugene C. Putala, Assistant Professor of Botany., September 1 

William E* Randall, Jr e , Associate Professor of Beersation Leadership, Sept* 1 

Georgia Held, Instructor in Physical Education for Women, September 1 

Thomas E* Bice, Instructor in Geology, Seg&ember 1 

Grace Robertson, Instructor in fhysioal Education for Women y Sept amber 1 

Donald W # Rogers, Assistant Professor of Philosophy s February 1 

Jean R» Rouge, Instractor in French, September 1 5 1/3 time 

Seymour Badin, Instructor in B&glish, September 1 

Balph B 6 Sehwarts, Instructor in- Mathematics* September 1 

Lawrence W. Sherman, Jr*, Assistant Professor of Business Administration, Sept, 

Qddvar Solstad* Instructor in Ohemic&l Engineering,, September X 

Bichard A, Southwictk, Instructor in Agronomy ^ September 1 

WUliaa C* Starkweather, Assistant Registrar (Instructor), September 1 

Helen B„ Stott^ l&structor in Music* 2/3 time for 1st semester 

Mary J a Strattaer* Assistant Professor of Home Economics, September 1 

Mrs, Marjorie F e Sullivan, Instructor in Home Economics, Sspt^siber l s 1/2 time 

Albert W 4 Wallace^, Instructor ±n Mathematics, September 1, i/2 time 

Esther H 9 Wallace* Instructor in Physical Education for Women, September 1 

Bo tort E 9 Will, Instructor in Economic a, September 1 

Bertram Woodland, Instructor in Geology, September 28 

Henry B, Woroniss, Instructor in Physical Education, September 1 

Isdward Za&s* Instructor in Business Administration^ September 1, 1st semester 

ECT&IWIf STATION 

William Mo Atwood, Instructor la Floriculture , Sept ember 1, 1/2 tin© 

Wallace G. Black, Associate .Professor of Animal Husbandry^ September 1 

Joan T* Cody, Instructor in Feeds and Fertilisers* October IB 

Martin B Oryan, 3nstruotor in Food Technology* August 1, 1/2 tiase 

Johannes BelphemdahX, Instructor in Agricultural Economics^ Sspt 1 ? 1/2 time 

Dewey B, Durrett, Instructor in AgricuitamX Economics* September /Z time 

Leslie W. Fleming, Instructor in feterinary Science, September ] 

Frederick J. Francis, Assistant Professor of Food Technology, 1 

Mrs. Georgia P« French, Instructor in Home Economics , August 16 & 1/2 time 

Henry W a Gilbertson, Instructor, Shade Tr©<9 Laboratories, July 1 

Julius So Greenstsin, Assistant Professor of £ndj&al Kusfoandry; ast 1 

Francis W iiolmes, Assistant Professor, Shade Tree Laboratories, Sept* 1 

Bauno A Lampl, Instructor in Food Technology July 

Karion B a Hhodes, Instructor, Feeds & Fertilisers j> September 16 

Eliot G Roberts* Assistant Professor of Agronomy* August 10 

Edward H« Seadale, Instructor in Veterinary Science* September 22 

Beryl Stone P Instructor in Home Economics^ September 1 

John W Q Zahradnik, Assistant Professor of Ajptlcultor&l Engineering? Sept- 20 

EXI&fSIOB SERVICE 

William E Meehl, Professor ©f Poult ry Pathology, October 6 
Robert 0, Simmons? Instructor^ Satan slen Editor, July 1 



KBSKSHAfDQHS 



Sari J, Anderson, Associate Prof©ssor of CM.! Engineering, Feb, 5, 1954 
tolajtl&ae Barthe, Instructor in French, August 31* 1954 
Benjasdn S, BenJaminoT, Instructor in diemiatry, August 31$ 1954 
Bobert F, Blebler^ Instructor In Psychology 5 August 31* 1954 
Bobert M 6 .Belaud, Assistant Professor cf Muslo, January 31* 1954 

grin* Bouin, Instructor is Physical Education for Women, August 31* 1954 
F&bert R. Bro*m, Bead of Pap&rta&snt of Electrical Engineering, August 31, 1954 
Frances S, Gamp, Instructor in Hiygie&l Estueatien for Women^ August 31 p 1954 
Gilbert Oestre, Instructor in French, August 31* 1954 
Alice J. Davey, Instructor in Hoa© JSeonomies, August 31* 1954 
Claries W. £unh«&, Instructor in Floriculture, August 31* 1954 
Wllltsa B„ lurrington,. Instructor ia Geology, August 31, 1954 

3„ Helen L, Field, Instructor in Psychology* January 31* 1954 
Mrs. Sandra G 6 Oo&iag, Assistant Physician, October 31f 1954 
tads 0, Goldstein, Instructor in Zoology, August 31* 1954 
Hfithan S a Hal®, Ascdgtant Professox of Animal Husbandry, August 31* 1954 
JBdwurd Halpem, Instructor In 2§atheijaties, April 1$ 1954 

Mrs. Kareia G, Hiubard, Instructor in Physical Education for Women, August 3L, 1954 
John J. Lawler, Instructor In Slsctricul Engineering, August 31* 1954 
i&tcnell A. Light, Assistant Professor of Geology, August 31* 1954 
Herbert £« Lindner, Instructor In ffech&nieal Engineering, August 31* 1954 
Allen EL Maeljsin©, Instructor in English* August 31* 1954 
Gertrude H, McJnerson, Instructor in Sociology, August 31, 1954 
August Storlunder, Jr., Instructor in Mathematics, August 31* 1954 
George J, O'Bura, Instructor in Oivil Engineering, August 31* 1954 
Hrso Kathleen J. P&delford, Assistant Professor of Education, January 31* 1954 
Thomas A. Parley ^ Instructor in Animal Husbandry, August 31* 1954 
Mrs. Sara G Piatt, Assistant Professor of Horn© Economies, August 31* 1954 
Idnar&e I, Pina, Instructor in H&ihematles, August 31* 1954 
Mrs, Oleoa© H„ Botan, Instructor in Gsology, August 31* 1954 
Jera&e Rothenberg, instructor in Economics, January 31* 1954 
Howard M, Saehar, Instructor in History, August 31* 1954 

Robert M 9 St, Clair, Assistant Professor of Business Administration, August 31, 1954 
Bobert E. Schsffrath, Instructor in Cheffiietry, August 31* 1954 
Joan L. Spencer, Assistant Professor of Botsny, August 31, 1954 
Opal D. Stech, Assistant Professor of House Economies, August 31, 1954 
Mrs, Doris G.3, Stockton, Instructor in Mathematics, August 31, 1954 
Theodore R e Vallenee, Assistant Professor of Psychology, August 31* 1954 
Killiam Velner, Instructor in Economies, August 31* 1954 
Donald E, Westcott, Instructor in Food Technology, August 31* 1954 

mwamrz 

Garl D, Brandt, Instructor in Bsu3t ry Disease, September 21, 1954 

George Caldes, Instructor, Feeds and Fertilisers, October 15, 1954 

Jaek S. Gray, Professor of Veterinary Science, December 31* 1954 

Joseph E* Gray, Assistant Professor of Veterinary Seience, January 31* 1954 

Louise P. Guild, Instructor in Bom© Economics, July 31, 1954 

Georgia P* Markalcia, Instructor in Food Technology, July 31* 1954 



USTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : To authorize the President to expend an 
additional $500.00 from the unrestricted 
Sprague Fund for the period ending 
June 30, 1955. (This is in addition to 
the $500.00 previously approved.) 

On the recommendation of the University Committee on 

Naming of Buildings and of the .President, it was 

VOTED: To name the auditorium of the Waltham 
Field Station building - Ray M. Koon 
Auditorium - in honor of the retired 
head of the Waltham Field Station. 

On the recommendation of the University Committee on 

Naming of Buildings and of the President, it was 

VOTED : To name the new men 1 s dormitory - 

Van Meter House - in honor of retired 
President Ralph A. Van Meter. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4-*00 p.m. 




& ~ tC* 



9-^2^^ 




_Secretary 



^\ , W^o^-zAX^V^ 



Chairman 



1829 



Sprague 

Electric 

Company 

Fund 



Ray M. Koon 
Auditorium 



Van Meter 
House 



1830 



TRUSTEE 



Courses 
of Study 



McCune, Shannon 



Provost 



Cahill, Fred V, 

Dean of Arts 
and Science 



Sevoian, Martin 

Professor of 
Veterinary Sci. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Minutes of Meeting of Board of Trustees 
May 16, 1955 > 1:30 p.m., Hotel Statler, Boston, Mass, 



PRESENT: 



Chairman Bartlett presiding 

Trustees Bartlett, Brett, Boyden, 
Miss Buxton, Cashin, Crowley, 
Desmond, Mrs. McNamara, Perry, 
Taber, Whitmore, President Mather, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Burke 



It was 



VOTED : To dispense with reading of the call and 

reading of the minutes of the last meeting. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To approve the attached changes in the 
Course of Study. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To appoint Dr. Shannon McCune as Provost 
of the University effective September 1, 
1955 at annual salary of $10,330. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was unanimously 

VOTED: To appoint Dr. Fred V. Cahill as Dean of 
the College of Arts and Science effective 
June 15, 1955 at annual salary of #8,530. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To appoint Dr. Martin Sevoian as Professor 
of Veterinary Science "A" effective 
August 1, 1955 at annual salary of $7,030. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was unanimously 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED ; To award the degree Doctor of Humane Letters 
to Professor Frank Prentice Rand at the June 
commencement in 1955 • 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To change sabbatical leave granted to 
Dr. Vernon P. Helming from one year at 
half pay to one semester at full pay for 
study in Europe. Leave is to be taken 
during the spring of 1956 subject to the 
usual conditions pertaining to sabbatical 
leaves. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was unanimously 

VOTED ; To name Professor Victor A. Flee, Professor 
of Animal Husbandry Emeritus, effective on 
his retirement August 31 j 1955. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To name Dr. Denzel J. Hankinson, Head of the 
Department of Dairy and Animal Science "A" 
effective September 1, 1955* 

Trustee Vhitmore reported for the Committee on Buildings 
and Grounds. He reviewed the current building program of the Uni- 
versity saying that his committee had met on May 11 with Sidney 
Shurcliff , who is preparing the master plan for development of the 
University, with Niels Larsen, the consulting architect, and with a 
number of architects who are working on individual buildings. He 
said that the committee is pleased with the progress being made and 
named the following buildings for which funds have been appropriated 

The Public Health building which will be con- 
structed as the first section of a Science Center. 

The Women's Physical Education building, plans 
for which are complete. 



1831 



Rand, Frank 
Honorary Degree 



Helming, Vernoi 
P. 

Sabbatical 
Leave 



Rice, Victor A, 

Professor of 
Animal Hus- 
bandry Emeritus 



Hankinson, 
Denzel J. - 
Head of Depart- 
ment of Dairy 
and Animal 
Science 



Master 
Plan 



1832 



TRUSTEE 



Gift 



Harriet G. Bird 



funds. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The addition to the Chemistry building for 
which plans will be completed in two or three 
months . 

The Classroom building for which plans are 
complete. 

The addition to the Engineering building now 
under construction. 

Remodelling of Bowker Auditorium now under 
construction. 

Remodelling of Flint Laboratory now under con- 
struction. 

These projects total approximately $7,000,000 from State 



Chairman Whitmore also stated that plans have been com- 



pleted for the $2,000,000 Student Union building to be constructed 
by the Massachusetts Building Association. 

The University is requesting an additional $6,000,000 
for capital outlay in the budget now before the Legislature. 

Trustee "Whitmore reviewed briefly the outlines of the 
master plan for the University as prepared by Mr. Shurcliff . He 
discussed the eventual need for the moving of the athletic fields 
to the west onto present farm land and hence the need for the pur- 
chase of new land for agricultural purposes. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Buildings and 

Grounds, it was unanimously 

VOTED ; To accept gift of $50,000 from Miss Harriet 
G. Bird of Stow, Treasurer of Red Acre Farm, 
Inc. for construction of a building for the 
investigation of health problems of large 
animals and to request the President to ex- 
press the appreciation of the Trustees to 
Miss Bird. 



1833 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Q n ^he recommendation of the Committee on Buildings and 

Grounds, it was unanimously 

VOTED; To appoint McClintock and Craig of Spring- 
field as architects for the building for 
the investigation of health problems of 
large animals with the understanding that 
this appointment will be made only when 
funds for construction of the building have 
been received by the Trustees. 

Trustee Whitmore said that the Buildings and Grounds 

Committee had reconsidered the problem of purchasing of electric 

power from Western Massachusetts Electric Company as against the 

construction of additional generating facilities in the University 1 s 

power plant. He reviewed the findings of his committee as reported 

in the minutes of May 11, 1955 and after discussion, it was 

unanimously 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to enter into 

contract with Western Massachusetts Electric 
Company in the name of and for the Board of 
Trustees for the purchase of electric power 
under proposal A of the Western Massachusetts 
Electric Company dated March 25* 1955 for a 
period not to exceed ten years. 

Under this contract the University will provide its own 
power up to the capacity of the current generating facilities during 
the heating season of each year. Western Massachusetts Electric 
will provide power during those periods when the buildings are not 
heated and during the heating season will provide such power as is 
needed by the University in excess of its own productive capacity. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Buildings and 

Grounds, it was unanimously 

VOTED: To authorize the administration to submit 
a capital outlay program for the year be- 
ginning July 1, 1956 in the amount of 
$6,070,000 for 12 projects as listed on 
the attached program. 



Western 
Massachusetts 
Electric 
Company 



Electric 

Power 

contract 



Capital 

Outlay 

Program 



1834 



TRUSTEE 



Five-Year 

Building 

Program 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was also 

VOTED : To authorize the administration to submit 
to the Division of Building Construction 
a five-yes r capital outlay program be- 
ginning July 1, 1956 in the amount of 
$31*890,000 as listed in the attached pro- 
gram. 

President Mather reviewed for the Board the anticipated 
size of the student body of the University for the next ten years 
if the building program proceeds as planned. Even though approxi- 
mately $7,000,000 worth of buildings is now underway, it will be 
impossible to increase the number of students for the next year or 
two. In fact, it lias been necessary to reduce by about 200 the 
size of the freshman class for the fall of 1955 as against the 
freshman classes of the last few years. The reason for this is 
that more sophomores, juniors and seniors are returning to the Uni- 
versity than in previous years as selectivity has gone up and 
attrition has gone down. The first series of new buildings will 
merely catch up on facilities needed for the present size student 
body and will replace some of the dilapidated fire-traps on the 
campus. Beginning in 1957 and 1958, however, size of the student 
body can be increased fairly rapidly if the building program pro- 
ceeds as scheduled. 

President Mather said that the maintenance budget which 
provides funds for instruction and upkeep of buildings and grounds 
is lagging behind the capital outlay budget and that strenuous 
efforts must be made to obtain maintenance funds in keeping with 
the growing needs of the University. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Buildings and 



Grounds, it was unanimously 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To approve final plans for the Women' s 

Physical Education building as presented 
to the Buildings and Grounds Committee 
on May 11 by Perry, Shaw, Hepburn, Kehoe 
and Dean. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Buildings and 

Grounds, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To approve final plans for the Student 

Union building as presented to the Build- 
ings and Grounds Committee on May 11 by 
Louis ¥. Ross. 

Trustee Brett reported for the Committee on Agriculture and 
Horticulture which met on May 10, 1955 ♦ He reviewed the retirement 
program for extension workers, pointing out that at the present 
time the Massachusetts law requires them to belong to the Massachu- 
setts Retirement Association. However, the Federal government is 
insisting that the same people be members of the Federal Retirement 
System in order that they may have the franking privilege and use 
space rent-free in Federally owned buildings. After discussion, it 
was 

Resolved that the #oard of Trustees of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts is opposed at present 
to the ruling compelling all Cooperative Exten- 
sion workers in Massachusetts to be members of 
the Federal Retirement System as a specific re- 
quirement for cooperative Federal appointments. 
The Board requests that the Administration of 
the University of Massachusetts investigate all 
possibilities for resolving the problems 
connected with the conflict between Federal and 
State Retirement Systems. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Agriculture and 

Horticulture, it was unanimously 

VOTED: To change the name of the present School of 
Agriculture and Horticulture to College of 
Agriculture effective July 1, 1955 • 



1835 



Women' s 
Physical 
Education 
Building 



Student 

Union 

Building 



Retirement 
System 



College of 

Agriculture 



1836 



TRUSTEE 



Department of 
Dairy and 
Animal Science 



Commonwealth 
Scholarships 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



On the recommendation of the Committee on Agriculture and 

Horticulture, it was unanimously 

VOTED ; To authorize the President to combine 
the currently separate Departments of 
Dairy Industry and Animal Husbandry in- 
to a Department of Dairy and Animal 
Science under one head effective 
September 1, 1955. 

On the recommendation of the University Scholarship 

Committee and of ^resident Mather, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To award Commonwealth Scholarships and 

to name alternates for Commonwealth Scholar- 
ships in accordance with the attached 
schedule. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:4-5 p.m. 



~^ 









? ——S ecretary 



iJ^> ?Ct^sQUxXr^ Chairman 



CHANGES m THE COGfB.SE OF STUDY 
Romance Languages 

<M J8^J*>»-Ki«Ctg--«.aaa*W*'il»ii|ilUHMIW*lll iWMIHf IMBTI VM* mil' I 

3 revive a dropped course formerly taught ass 
FRENCH 7 {1} B (II) INTERMEDIATE fBEBGH 

Selected readings from representative French literary works and a thorough 
slew and study of grammar. Compositions, reports , outside reading. In- 
tensive oral practice. 

3 class hours j 1 laboratory period Credit* 3 

Prerequisites? 2-3 years of high school French^ as substantiated by place- 
ment examination* 

To offer the following new courses? 

FRENCH 25 (I) 26 (II) IKTRflDGCTION TO FRENCH LITERATURE 

study of the outstanding literary trends with readings from representa- 
tive masterpieces of the literature from the Middle Ages to the present. 

etures* reports and discussion* Prerequisite French 7* 8 

ITALIAK 27 (I) 2S (II) ORAL ITALIAN 

tis course is intended for those students who wish to perfect their 
knowledge of the spoken language* Prerequisites* Italian 5* 6 or special 
permission of the Department 

ITALIAN 25 (I) 26 (II) INTRODUCTION TO ITALIAN LITERATURE 
This course traces the development of Italian literature from the IJth 
through the 20th centuries. Lectures, readings from some of the most im- 
portant works, reports and discussions. The course is conducted in Italian. 
Prerequisites, Italian 5* 6 or special permission of the Department 

SPANISH 63 (I) 62, (II) ADVAKCED SPAEIgH COMPOSITION AND SYNTAX 
A study of syntax and idioms s and of those more advanced and difficult 
elements which constitute stylistics. An abundance of original composition 
leads the student to express himself clearly, logically and fluently In 
living Spanish* Open to juniors and seniors majoring in Spanish and 'bo 
other qualified students by special permission of the department. 
Prerequisite s j Spanish 9* 10 and at least one course in Spanish literature* 

SPANISH 35 (I) S6 (II) CERVANTES. 

Reading of Don Quixote; lectures, discussions, collateral readings and re- 

s -^ .mi mini *idh' -ift*~-T— fr-trm*-' ■ * *™" 

ports . The course is conducted in Spanish. 

Prerequisites, Spanish 25* 26 or special permission of the Department* 

Olericulture 

To change Olericulture 78, Commercial Olericulture, to 

OLERICULTURE 52 (II) COMMERCIAL VEGETABLE PRODUCTION 

This course deals with the commercial production of the more important 

vegetable crops grown out of doors and under glass, including the principles 

basic to vegetable farm organisation and management, plant growing, 

varieties, soil management, cultivation* weed control, irrigation and other 

special cultural practices. Trips to nearby farms will be required. 

2 class hours j 1-2 hr* laboratory period. Credit , 3 

8:00-8.50 Mon., Fri. 3?00-^s50 Prl* Mr. Johnson 



~2- 



To offer the following new course t 

OLERICULTURE 30 (II) SPECIAL PBQBL34S. 

An advanced study of specific problems relative to the production and 

marketing of vegetable crops* including a review of basic research reports 9 

current literature and in the presentation of written and oral reports by 

each student working under a specific member of the Department staff* 

1 class hour j A laboratory hours. Credit, 3 
By arrangement Mr. Snyder & Department 

To drop Horticulture 1* Plant Propagation, and to substitute 
HOBTICuXTURS 2 BASIC HORTICULTURE 

An introductory course for those interested in acquiring some basic 
knowledge of herticulturaliy important plants* This is concerned with the 
structure, flowering and fruiting habits, propagation, training, pruning, 
and storage of many of our economic plaits as well as an introductory 
discussion of the influence of soil, nutritional status, environmental 
factors and growth regulating substances on their development* 

2 Class hours, 1 2-hr* laboratory 

Pomology 

To change Pomology 53* General Pomology, tos 
POMOLOGY 25 CD BITRODUCTOFY POMOLOGY. 

This course deals with modern tree fruit production including varieties 
orchard sites and soils, planting systems, soil management, fertilizers, 
bearing habits, pruning, pollination, thinning, pest control and handling 
the crop. The content of this course should be of value to students major- 
ing in allied fields. 
2 class hours; 1 2-hr. laboratory period. Credit, 3 

To change Pomology 81-82, Advanced Pomology, to the following two courses . 
POMOLOGY 79 (I) ADVANCED POMOLOGY (1956-57) 

Special attention is given to more important findings of research dealing 
with the interrelation of stock and scion, temperature influences, water 
relationships and the mineral nutrition of fruit plants. The geography of 
world fruit production i:: also considered. Given in alternate years* 
Prerequisite Pomology 25 or equivalent. Credit, 3 

2 class hours; 1 2-hr. laboratory period. 

POMOLOGY 81 (I) ADVANCED POMOLOGY (1957-58) 

A critical study of the more important research dealing with pollination, 

fruit set and thinning, preharvest drop, biennial bearing, and the 

physiology of fruit during storage. The location and objectives of fruit 

breeding programs in the United States are also discussed. Given in 

alternate years. 

Prerequisite Pomology 25 or equivalent* Credit, 3 

2 class hours; 1 2-hr. laboratory period* 

To change Pomology 77 (I), Commercial Pomology, to POMOLOGY 77 (I) FPUIT 

MAEKETIHG (1957-58) 

This course consists of a critical study of the handling of fruit from tree 

to consumer, including such phases as the physiology of fruit as related to 

harvesting procedure, also fruit grades and grading, packing, storing and 

merchandising. Given in alternate years. 

2 class hours; 1 2-hr. laboratory period. Credit, 3 



To change Pomology 84. (II), Seminar, to 

POMOLOGY H (II) SPECIAL PE0BL34S IN POMOLOGY 

Each student will investigate an individual problem pertinent to his 

future objectives. Reports on these student problems and on current 

penological research will be presented at the weekly class hours. 

Prerequisites Pomology 79 and 81. Credit, 3 

1 class hour; 4 laboratory hours. 



Geolo. 



To expand Geology 51 (I)* Mineralogy, to a two semester course as follows: 

GEOLOGY 51 (I) 52 (II) MINERALOGY 

A course designed to meet the needs of students majoring in geology and 

allied fields*, The first semester 1 s work deals with all of the mineral 

classes with the exception of the silicate group which has been reserved 

for the second semester* 

Prerequisites Chemistry I and II Credit, 

1 class hour; 2 2-hr. laboratory periods. 



Hoxae Economic s 

To drop Home Economics 1, Introduction to Home Economics, and to substitute 
the following course, with the proviso that no student be permitted to take 

W* W lli l i I I PI T ' -'F " .7 r |ll I IWIIM I • 

both Home Economics II and Home Economics 80 for credit? 
HOME ECONOMICS II (I) EUTHENICS 

A study of the influences of family living experiences upon personality de- 
velopment with emphasis upon self-understanding as a prerequisite to healthy 
adjustment in present and future life of the student. A discussion of the 
knowledge and skills necessary for successful home-making involving marriage 
and parenthood. 
3 class hours. Credit, 3 

To drop Home Economics 2, Clothing Selection, and to substitute the follow- 
ing course: HOME ECONOMICS 12 (II) CONSUMER CLOTHIFG PROBLEMS 
This course consists of three fundamental approaches to clothing problems: 
consumer education in relation to economics in the field of ready-to-wear; 
study of art and psychology applied to the selection of apparel; basic 
principles of construction. A protest is offered, during the first semester, 
to women who have had previous study or experience in this field. Adjust- 
ments in assignments will be made according to ability. 
2 class hours; 1 2-hour laboratory period. Credit, 3 

Nursing 

To approve the following three courses from the Division of Nursing. These 
courses are substantially the same as others already approved for that 
curriculum but they are intended for Graduate Nurses and it is deemed ad- 
visable to have them appear under separate number and title to avoid con- 
fusion in transcripts: 



-4- 

IORSXNG 70 (G«B.) MANAGEMENT OF THE HOSPITAL NURSING UNIT 
General principles of management are applied to management of patient care 
in the hospital nursing unit, Snphasis is placed upon the nurse as a xaember 
of the health and nursing team* The course is planned for the potential 
head nurse, the experienced head nurse without formal preparation and/or the 
staff nurse interested in leadership of the nursing team* By permission of 
instructor. Credit, 2 

HUBSING 71 (G.N.) NEWER CONCEPTS IN MATERNAL AMD CHILD CARE 
A concept of family centered care is developed through discussion of newer 
methods of maternal and new born care % consideration of the relationship of 
basic philosophies and principles of child care to recent developments in 
the field of pediatric nursings and a beginning study of the meaning of ill- 
ness to the child 5 his parents and the nurse* By permission of instructor* 

Credit, 2 

HORSING 72 (G.N.) PERSONNEL PROGRAMS IN SCHOOLS OF NURSING 

An appraisal of the principles, practices and problems related to the organiza- 
tion and implementation of effective student personnel services within a 
school of nursing. Techniques used in the selection and counseling of stu- 
dents are demonstrated. Practice is given in the evaluation of selected stu- 
dent personnel programs, By permission of instructor. 

Credit, 2 

Liberal Arts 



To approve the following courses from the School of Liberal Artss 
GOVERNMENT 55 (S) THE PRESIDENCY IN AMERICAN GOVERNMENT (to be given in 
Summer School only) The growth of the executive in 0. S. Government, Vary- 
ing conceptions of the presidential office* Constitutional and political as- 
pects of the office in legislation, administration and conduct of foreign 
and military affairs. President as party leader. 
Prerequisite Government 25 • Credit, 3 

EDUCATION 81 (S) TEACHING FOREIGN LANGUAGE IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (to be given 
In Summer School only) The latest techniques, methods, and materials will 
be presented by instructors froia the Departments of Education and Foreign 
Language. (For trainees in elementary education or elementary teachers who 
have a major in foreign language). Credit, 3 

SOCIOLOGY 26. PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY 

A survey of the theoretical development of major sociological concepts with 

emphasis on American sociologists and their contributions. Reading and 

analysis of monographs utilizing the " sociological frame of reference for 

selected areas. 

3 class hours. Credit, 3 



-5- 



Mathe matics 

To /orise the Mathematics Department to continue for one sore year (1955-56) 
to experiment vith six sections in freshman Mathematics for Liberal Arts 
majors with course descriptions as follows s 

Mathematics 1. Introductory Ma: :ics I. Basic est- theoretic and axiomatic 

concepts, mabsr systems and equations. A study of elementary functions, 
algebraically and by the methods of analytic geometry. 

Mathe 2* Introductory Mathematics II. A terminal course intended for 
students ^iiose curriculum calls for just one year of Mathematics, A continua- 
tion of Mathematics 1, including topics from the calculus, statistics and 
rbhematics of finance, 

ihematics U* introductory Mathematics IV. A continuation of !dathematics 1 
those students intending to take further courses in Mathematics. Analytic 
ometry and trigonometry. 



May 9, 1955 

UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



CAPITAL OUTLAY PROGRAM 
FOR THE FIVE-YEAR PERIOD FISCAL 1957-1961 

U of M 
State Building 

Priority Pro.ject Funds Assoc. Funds 

1957 

1. Addition to the Library ;2,000,000- , - , ~ 

including furnishings & 

equioment. j 

2. Science Center (second 2,000,000- 

portion), including 
furnishings & eouipment 
and working drawings for 
total project. 

3. General Maintenance Building 500,000 

& Garage, including furnish- 
ings & equipment 

4. Cold Storage Laboratory 265,000 

(replacement for Fisher 
Laboratory) , including 
equipment. 

5. Working Drawings for Infirmary 60,000 

6. Working Drawings for School 45,000 

of Education Building h 

7. R0TC Armory & Classrooms 600,000- 

including furnishings & 
equipment. 

3. Physical Education Playing 150,000 
Fields, including drainage, 
grading & seeding. 

9. Equipment, to be in 100,000 

addition to 1955 appropri- 
ation. 

10. Purchase of Certain Land 150,000 

11. Roads, Walks, & Parking 200,000 

Areas 

12. Dormitories for 550 Men 1,450,000 



Total 1957 &6, 070,000 $1,450,000 

a. Preliminary study being made. 

b. Cost estimate subject to adjustment based on architectural study. 

c. Appropriation made for working drawings, 

d. Special study made. Public Health Building designed as first 
portion of Science Center. 



CAPITAL OUTLAY PROGRAM -2- 



Priority 



1953 



Project 



1. Science Center (third portion) 

to be in addition to 1956 
appropriation, including 
furnishings & equipment* 

2. Infirmary, including furnishings 

& equipment. 

3. School of Education Building, in- 

cluding furn, & equipment, 

4. Addition to Food Technology, in- 

cluding furn. & equipment. 

5. Natural Resources Building, in- 

cluding furn. & equipment. 

6. Working Drawings for Dining 

Commons (Men*s Area) 

7. Additions to Utilities to be in 

addition to prior appropriations. 
3. Equipment to be in addition to 

prior appropriations. 
9. Dormitories for 216 Men 
10. Dormitories for 134 Women 



State 
Funds 



$2,750,000^ 

1,000,000 
300,000 
550,000 
600,000 
65,000 
300,000 
100,000 



Total 1953 



$>6, 165, 000 



U of M 

Building 

Assoc. Funds 



550,000 
450,000 



Jl,000, 000 



1. 

2. 
3. 
4. 

5. 
6. 

7. 



3. 
9. 

10. 
11. 
12. 



1252 

Dining Commons - Men's Area, 
including furnishings & 
equipment. 

Engineering Shops, including 
furnishings & equipment. 

Physical Education Building for 
Men, including furn. & equip. 

Additions to Power Plant & 
Utilities, to be in addition 
to prior appropriations. 

Equipment, to be in addition to 
prior appropriations. 

Working Drawings for Addition to 
Physics Building 

Addition to Experiment Station 
Building at East Wareham, in- 
cluding furn. & equip. 

Poultry Plant Building & Labs. 

Animal Industries Building, in- 
cluding furn. & equip. 

Roads, Walks, & Parking Areas 

Dormitordes for 437 Men 

Dormitories for 363 Women 



1,300,000 

475,000 

1,750,000 

600,000 

100,000 

30,000 

200,000 



100 , 000 
300,000 

200,000 



1 , 100 , 000 

900,000 



Total 1959 



SP 



^5,605,000 



$2,000,000 



CAPITAL OUTLAY PROGRAM -3- 



Priority 



Project 



I960 



1. Addition to P hysics Building, 

including furnishings & 
equipment. 

2. Classrooms & Offices, School of 

Business Administration, in- 
cluding furn. & equip, 

3. Plant Science Building & Green- 

houses, including furnishings 
& equipment. 

4. Equipment, to be in addition to 

prior appropriations. 

5. Administration Building, in- 

cluding furn. & equip. 

6. Assembly Hall & Field House, 

including furn. & equip. 

7. Dormitories for 471 Men 
3. Dormitories for 329 Women 



Total I960 



State 
Funds 



i'- 



$1, 2 50, ooo 

1,000,000 

1,500,000 

100,000 
1,000,000 
2,000,000- 



$6,350,000 



U of M 

Building 

Assoc. Funds 



1,250,000 
350,000 



§2,100,000 



*10 



1961 

1. Farm Buildings Replacements 

2. Engineering Building, including 

furnishings & equipment. 

3. Classroom Building, including 

furnishings & equipment. 

4. Auditorium & Music Center, 

including furn. & equip. 

5. Roads, Walks & Parking Areas 

6. Dormitories for 412 Men 

7. Dormitories for 233 Women 



Total 1961 



3,000,000- 
1,500,000 

1,000,000 

1,500,000- 

200,000 



1,100,000 
750,000 



$7,200,000 



tl, 350, 000 



v 



TOTAL - FIVE-YEAR PROGRAM $31,390,000 



$3,400,000 



COMMONWEALTH SCHOTARSHIP ALTERNATES 

According to Rank 
Class" of 1916 



Town 



County 



wrw ai weV few> ^g wiifc pti. i mjff B jin<iwMi.-.LJC.. 



Lewis , Sheldon 

Fleming , Neil 
Powers , Thomas 

WOMEN 



Brookline 
Lawrence 
Fall Blver 



Norfolk 
Essex 

Bristol 



Arts & Sciences 

Arte & Sciences 
Business Adnie 



Currier, Helen A, 
Kees, Beryl P. 
Grant j Bettylou 

Kelson, Carol P. 



Wore© st er 
Hopkinton 

Wilmington 
Mansfield 



Worcester 
Middlesex 
Middlesex 
Bristol 



Arts & Sciences 
Business Adro» 
Home Economics 
Home Economics 



MEN 

Berard, Leo J 

WOMEN 



Gray, Nancy E, 
Rawlins, Joan 

Campos, Jane 



Class of 19$% 



Walt ham 



Ashfleld 

New Bedford 
Oak Bluffs 



Middlesex Engineering 



Franklin 

Bristol 
Dukes 



Arts & Sciences 
Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



MEII 



Fursa, Biehard S, 
Nicholson, Norman K* 
Robbina, Lloyd B, 

Temple, Robert K 

WOMEN 

Flood, Judith A 
Verkade, Jeannette 
Richards, Margaret A, 
Rudman, Phyllis C 



Class of 1958 



Holyoke 
Amherst 

Brain tree 
Amherst 



Bridgewater 
Ostervill© 
Millers Falls 
Worcester 



Hampden 
Hampshire 
Norfolk 
Hampshire 



Plymouth 

Barnstable 

Franklin 

Worcester 



Engineering 

Arts & Sciences 

Engineering 

Engineering 



Home Economics 

Arts & Sciences 
Arts & Sciences 
Home Economics 



COMMONWEALTH SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS 



Class of I959 



N ame 

MEN 

Robert A e Murphy 
John Cooco 
Joseph (K Purnhagen 
Edward D. Brennan 
Richard Gibbs 
Richard E« Conte 
Wayne C« Jaasohke 
Robert Ro Miner 
Thomas F* Fleming 
Jerald A* Grimes 
Frederick Mitchell 
Donald J« Torres 
Michael F, Powers 
Robert E. Kinnecorae 



ff! 



rown 



Lawrence 

Maynard 

Holyoke 



Holyoke 
Roxbury 

North Adams 

Otis 

Brookline 

Athol 

Buzzards Bay 
Hew Bedford 
Milford 
North Uxbrldge 



Essex 

Middlesex 
Hampden 



Hampden 
Suffolk 

Berkshire 

Berkshire 

Norfolk 

Worcester 

Barnstable 

Bristol 

Worcester 

Worcester 



Major Deot 

ir-i /p.ftiii ■ it >.uihii>iiii ji 



Engineering 

Arts & Sciences 
Arts & Sciences 
Arts & Sciences 
Agric & Ilortc 
Business Adm* 
Business Adm, 
Engineering 
Engineering 
Engineering 
ArtSo & Sciences 
Arts & Sciences 
Arts & Sciences 
Business Adm 



WOMAN 

■HWW—'HWi Mill 

Mary "* Ellam 
Janet E« Manning 
Jacqueline M« Brown 
Lois" Lc. Eckert 
Arnett M, Jenkins 
Virginia Robbins 
Nancy J . , Wilder 
Sandra H» Hecht 
Rose Lev in son 
Priscilla G« Ehnes 
Joan Lo Whiteraan 



Clinton 

Lexington 

Greenfield 

Dorchester 

Mat tapoi sett 

Springfield 

Worcester 

Saugus 

l*ynn 

Medfield 

East Bridgewater 



Worcester 

Middlesex 

Franklin 

Suffolk 

Plymouth 

Hampden 

Worcester 

Essex 

Essex 

Norfolk 

Plymouth 



Home Economics 
Arts & Sciences 
Arts & Sciences 
Nursing 

Home Economics 
Arts & Sciences 
Arts & Sciences 
Arts & Sciences 
Arts & Sciences 
Home Economics 
Home Economics 



co: 

According to Rank 



:-jg 



fown 



County 









rfciggell Mc 

Pgoa 

- bin 

Maniatis 

.] 

sore Lc 
John yss, Jr, 

Robert W. ?iwars$ 

Stuart C lOUgh 

Da?id D, ?;• r 

aaia "." 






Dorchester 

ten 
Jr. se 

i a 

yard Haven 
met own 
La 



Suffolk 

Ol£ 

-ster 

: a r 

Leeex 

Bristol 

•i-an 
Dulses 

Berkshire 



Engineering 

^iences 
Arts cienees 
i 3 see 
sienc 
Arts „-i£nees 
Arts i Sciences 
Engineering 
Engineering 
Engineering 

anees 






Colette Dumont 
Yorkette R. 3olcr 
Irma L< Pearson 
Carols Jo Conrad 
Adelia Ac Alii 3 
Janet I talia 
Judith .. Rice 
Joan R. Forward 
Roherta Weinberg 



:**th UxbricU 


fcer 


Al 


Scienc 


vers 


Fbli 


'tfl 


& Scienc 


h'obura 


Kiddies: 


pfcs 


Sciences 


rg 


reenter 


; ts 


Scienc 


Whs . 3 


i 


Arts 




Id 


i 






.e 


Berks aire 




:■§ 


Sangufl 


ICS23X 


pfcs 


& Sciences 


rch ester 




Arts 


Scien&es 



Hay 12, 1955 



>_ 



UNIVERSITY OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 



Qommencement 
1955 



\ 



1863 - Ninety-second Year - 1955 



Lw>£ . 



1837 



r . Cahill 
Lced to 
'rsity 

resident 



Degrees 



ering 



15 Eachelor of Science in Civil Engineering 

18 Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 

32 Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 



. 



1837 



wiS, 



GRADUATION EXERCISES 



Eighty-Fifth 
Commencement 




r . Cahill 
iced to 
Tsity 

resident 



Degrees 



LIBRARY LAWN 

( 1 n case of rain the exercises will be held in the Curry S. Hicks 
Physical Education Building) 

Sunday, June 5, 1955, at 2:00 P. M. 



ering 



g 



15 Eachelor of Science in Civil Sngineei i 

IS Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 

32 Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 



. 



'Program 



tvJS I 



ROCESSIONAL 



NVOCATION 



THE REVEREND J. ALFRED LANE 

Pastor, St. Brigid's Parish 
Amherst 



GREETINGS FROM THE COMMONWEALTH 

HIS HONOR SUMNER G. WHITTIER 

Lieutenant Governor 



1837 



lDDRESS 



EARL LATHAM, Ph.D. 

Department of Political Science 
Amherst College 



INFERRING; OF DEGREES 

PRESIDENT JEAN PAUL MATHER, M.B.A., M.A. 

RECESSIONAL 

)rganist: DORIC, ALVIANI, Professor of Musie 



\ Cahill, 
iced to 
i rsity 

resident 



I 



(The audience is requested to remain standing 
while the academic procession withdraws) 



Degrees 



ering 



g 



15 Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering 

18 Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 

32 Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCE 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF ARTS 



Summa Cum Laude 
Henry Paul Monaghan 



Betty Marilyn Munch 



Magna Cum Laude 



Marj 



jorie Jean Vaughan 



Ruth Elna Haenisch 
Ina Althea Hettinger 
Jonathan Page Lane 
Herman Francis Nelson, Jr. 
Lawrence Paros 



Cum Laude 



Nancy Bissell Wyman 



William Irving Savel 
David Elmer Seymour 
Barbara Jean Smith 
Barbara Joan Strachan 
Joan Margaret Whittemore 



Rite 



David Adolph 
Irwin Norman Alberts 
Jane Allen 

Nancy Jeanne Andrews 
Elliet Norman Aronson 
Joan Ellen Ashe 
Henry Philip Auffrey 
Susan Faith Bageant 
Emily Louise Bangs 
Barbara Marsden Barnett 
Barbara Jean Bedell 
Dorothy Bradford Bemis 



Bette Bennett 

Dorothy Jean Bourgault 

Sheila Anne Brigham 

Nathaniel Kirkegaard Brown 

Lois Natalie Bryant 
*Barry Lawrence Bunshoft 

Barbara Ann Burnham 

Douglas Calvin Call 
*Brenda Ann Campbell 

Margaret Jean Cann 

Anne Dexter Caroll 

Priscilla GraceChaplin 



->T^-- 



*As of the Class of 1954 



Janice Anne Cliaskes 
Edison K. Chua 
Charles Eugene Clapin 
Robert Otis Clapp 
Alan Rogers Clarke 
Nancy Cobbett 
Philip Robinson Collins 
Myron Cooper 
Harry Thomas Cornelius 
Margaret Marieanne Coyle 
Stanley Howard Cramer 
Eleanor Nan Crouch 
Barbara Teresa Crowley 
Elaine Norma Davidson 
William Joseph Dean 
Frank Robert DiFederico 
Francis Peter DiGiammarino 
Elizabeth Ann Donahue 
Marjorie Ann Donovan 
Frances Elizabeth Dowd 
Patricia Carole Duffy 
Ann Melissa Eberle 
Gertrude Maria Eisler 
Joan Wedlake Emberley 
Beverly Claudia Ensher 
Mona Diane Erickson 
*Paul Franklin Faberman 
Ann Virginia Fairbanks 
Russell Eugene Falvey 
Patricia Ann Farrell 
Norman Dale Farwell 
Norman Ferber 
Joan Elizabeth Fisher 
Ruth Prescott Freeman 
John Michael Gallagher, Jr. 
Regina Elizabeth Garrity 
Ernest Victor Ghareeb 
Beverly Ann Giles 
Barbara Ann Gillespie 
Elaine Rose Gobbi 
Raymond Lauri Goguen 



*As of the Class of 1954 



Myron Lloyd Goldberg 
Patricia Lou Goldmann 
Zelda F. Goldstein 
Joyce Natalie Goldstone 
Allen Hovey Good 
Joan Susan Gorman 
Ronald Gottesman 
Arnold Edward Grade 
Joanne Elvira Gravalese 
Mary Teresa Greaney 
Delbert Aaron Greenwood 
Charles Leo Hamilton 
Stanley Leonard Handman 
Lela Adams Hardy 
Janet Hartford 
Louis Joseph Hebert 
Robert Wales Heywood 
Charles Jeremiah Higgins, Jr. 
Alfred Hoelzel 
Lawrence Mayer Hoff 
Elizabeth Rose Ingham 
Arthur Edwin Johnson, Jr. 
Walter William Kangas 
Bernardine Anne Kennedy 
Margaret Ann Kenney 
James Lambert Kidd 
Dorothy Jeanne Kinsley 
Joseph Andrew Kobak, Jr. 
Margaret Jean Kreuz 
Barbara Joan Kushner 
William Labb 
Thomas Stephen Lambert 
Doris Bella Langevin 
Phyllis Sitner Levy 
Lois Lezberg 
John Robert Lilly 
Nancy Henderson Lloyd 
*Robert Joseph Lynch 
Claire Estelle MacDonald 
Kenneth Allan MacDonald 



Lj£, 



1837 



r . Cahill 
iced to 
'rsity 

'resident 



ering 



•y 
fc> 



15 Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineer! 

18 Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 

32 Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 



Degrees 



William James Mackey 
Joan Helen Manley 
Myles Joel Marcus 
Robert Victor Maroni 
John Joseph Martin 
Sally Ellen McCambridge 
Dorothy Jean McKenna 
Alice Elizabeth McKinstry 
Bernard William Meckel 
Daniel Michael Melley 
Ursula Caroline Miranda 
Gordon Stanley Mirkin 
Marilyn Mishkin 
Mary Ann Mitchell 
Mary Elizabeth Mitchell 
Philip Herbert Mitchell 
Suzanne Lois Mocko 
Corinne Marion Moehle 
John Lincoln Morse 
Rosemarie Morse 
Suzanne Moynahan 
Eleanor Grace Nelson 

*Joan Cecile Nelson 
Ira Nathan Nottonson 
Janet Minton O'Hare 
Timothy Joseph O'Keefe, Jr. 

"Kenneth Ralph Orff 
Laurence Carson Osborne 
Santina Catherine Palano 
Anthony James Pappas 
Elizabeth Russell Parry 
Kathleen Olive Perry 

*Eugene Dolor Picard 
Alberta Marie-Louise Premo 
Phyllis Lorraine Pributsky 
Ernest Edward Proulx 
Marie Francis Quirk 
Roberta Ann Quirk 
Sara^Ruth Raymond 
Joan Anita Redden 



Donald Damon Reed 

Janet Winifred Reed 

Maxine Emma West Rhodes 

Gail Anne Riley 

Barbara Ann Rischitelli 

Yolanda Roberto 

Peter Robinson 

Brenda Bowman Rodenhizer 

Ellen Nancy Rogers 

Janet Hodecker Rose 
*Arthur Rosenberg 

Joan Lois Rudnick 

Mary Russell 

Rita Jane Salloom 

Sally Ann Sargent 

John Robert Saulnier 

Richard Edward Scarafoni 

Anne Chapman Seadale 

Florentine Constance Sembroski 

Edward Sharpies, Jr. 
*Richard N. Shea 

Faith Diana Shuman 

George Thomas Siddall, Jr. 

Clarence Lorenzo Simpson 

Theodore Small 

Alice Smith 

Janet Gertrude Smith 

Elgie Louise Stearns 

Barbara Ann Steplar 

Janet Stoney 

Constance Joyce Sullivan 

Phyllis Ann Sullivan 

Virginia Pannes Sullivan 

Edward Martin Swartz 

Cornell Sawyer Taylor 

Cynthia Ann Taylor 

Norma Louise Taylor 

Marilyn Anne Tessicini 

Hector Harry Trubounis 

Marilyn Ruth Tuttle 

Norma Mary Vanasse 



*As of the Class of 1954 



Margaret White Vartanian 
Ernestine Theresa Vivier 
Suzanne Watters 
Jordan Weinberg 
Donald Aloysius Welch 



Barbara Jean Wesslen 
David Alan Wetterberg 
Judith Pratt Wood 
Bernard Stanley Zaborowski 
Cynthia Zaft 



, 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 



Summa Cum Laude 
Richard Warren Fessenden 

Magna Cum Laude 



1837 



Louise Mae Cooley 



Allan Webster Dickinson 



Joseph Vincent Jacintho 



Cum Laude 



Joel Paul Douglas 
Nadia Fedoryshyn 
Elinor Doris Freedman 
Chester Anthony Giza 
Richard Hadley Holm 



Edward William Hughes 
Jean Elizabeth Pruyne 
Sally-Ann Roberts 
^Walter George Rockwood 
Walter Barton Schwimmer 



Charlotte Nadia Sherbrook 



r . Cahill 
iced to 
irsity 

'resident 



Rite 



*Phyllis Diane Adams 
Harrison Fitch Aldrich 
Allen Leonard Anderson, Jr. 
Charles David Barney, Jr. 
Allen Frost Batchelder 
Stephen Joseph Berestka 
James Bottomley 
Michael Francis Bruno 
Frederick Arlington Burne 
George Windsor Campbell 



Shirley Anne Childs 
Samuel Chornesky 
Anne Skillings Clement 
Linda McAuslan Cloutier 
Arden R. Cohen 
Edward David Cohen 
Nancy Alice Cole 
Theodore John Coletta 
Robert Bruce Collagan 



Degrees 



*As of the Class of 1954 



ering 



15 Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering 

IS Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 

32 Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 



John Henry Comfort 
Thomas Augustine Coneys 
Lawrence Everett Cornell 
Katherine Diane Courtney 
Paul Francis Cronin 
Paul Joseph Crowley 
James Harold David 
Peter Delivorias 
Edward Francis Demski 

*Anthony Joseph DiNardo 
Peter Mario Draghetti 
Theresa Anne Everson 
Henry Dominic Falcetti 
Ronald Joseph Fitzgerald 
Philip Henry Frankel 
John Sheldon Golden 
John McKenzie Gordon, Jr. 
Barbara Graham 
L. Jean Gralenski 
Richard Harold Graves 
Elizabeth Anne Hawkes 
Virginia Marie Hayes 
Richard Michael Hoey 
Carol Ann Hohenberger 
Dorothy Elisabeth Huebner 

*Robert Blake Hulsman 
Richard George Innis 
Robert Zelic Isenstein 
Elizabeth Blauvelt Jackson 
Richard Halsey Jackson 
Ralph Eric Jacobson 
Lola Elizabeth Jeffords 
Joseph James Kenney 
Andrew Apostles Kirkitelos 
William Carl Koch, Jr. 
Helen Kofos 
Mary Ellen Kukkula 
Gilbert Francis LaFreniere 
Morton Landy 
William Chase Lawrence 
Margaret Shera Lawson 



Ruth Muriel Lebowitz 
Jeanne Lee 

Sheila Johannah Lewis 
Joan Elizabeth Ling 
Richard John Mahoney 

*William Edward Mahoney 
Leonard Paul Marcotte 

*Charles Daniel McCarthy 
James Ogilvy Mcintosh 
Charles Edward Mento 
George Minasian 

*Peter Paul Mokrzecki, II 
Robert Patrick Morrison 
Mary Elizabeth Murray 
Paul Redfield Nelson, Jr. 
James Patrick Nolan 
Ceil Marguerite O'Donnell 
Mary Elizabeth Patton 
David Mark Poliks 
Richard Francis Quigley 
Ann Laura Ralston 
Richard Walter Rice 
Harold Leon Rudman 
Sheila Ryan 
Bruce Neil Sachar 
Ethel Schneider 
Corrine Agnes Scott 
Thomas Oliver Sedgwick 
David Lawrence Shores 
Estelle Dina Shuster 

*Richard Daniel Silverman 
Silvija Smelins 
Harold William Solomon 
Elaine Mary Sullivan 
Lucy Anne Tibbals 
Earle Alexander Tompkins 
Marion Faith Varnam 
Nancy Ruth Waechter 

♦Robert W. Walker 
Chandler Howard Waterman 
Charlotte Davis Wright 



*As of the Class of 1954 






SCHOOL OF 
AGRICULTURE AND HORTICULTURE 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 



Cum Laude 



Lyndon Belmont Carew, Jr. 
Norman Alan Fulton 
Paul Chester Killam 



Hugh Francis Ahem, Jr. 
James Robert Anderson 
Victor Blumenthal 
David Leo Bresnahan 
Paul Leo Brousseau 
Philip Luther Brown 
Robert Arthur Burbank 
Donald Wright Cameron 
Earl Eugene Carr 
William Francis Carr 
David Lyman Carson 
Ralph Holmes Charlwood 
Elizabeth Anna Chellis 
Arthur Frederick Clark 
William Kenneth Cobbett, Jr. 
Gerald M. Cohen 
James Rhodes Curtis 
Mary Ann Dolan 
Ernest Jay Dube 
Joseph Michael Faucette 
Paul Joseph Fellers 
Robert John Gallagher 
Charles Johnson Gatchell 
Gordon Neal Gottsche 
Donal Warren Halloran 
George David Hanna 
Ames Harrison 
Edward Francis Hennigan 



Rite 



Harriet Alfreda Lane 
Robert Henry Ruf, Jr. 
William Everett Todt 



Richard Fielding Henry 

John Lord Hobart 

George William Jones 

Edwin John Kaine 

Terry B. Kinney, Jr. 

Hosea W. Langeway 

Richard Edwin Larson 

Richard Thomas Lincoln 

William David Lombard 

Thomas Warren Lyle 

Clyde Leonard MacKenzie, Jr. 

Hector Ross MacLeod 

John Ellsworth Masaschi 

Francis Xavier McDermott 

Paul Robert Natale 

H. Charles Nixon 

Thomas Max Ott 

Harold Oxman 

Richard Carl Poikonen 

John David Porter 

Martin Seymour Promisel 

Richard David Putnam 
♦Robert Ellis Pywell 

Joseph John Ratyna 

Roger Warren Rich 
*Stephen Lewis Root 

Edward Edgecomb Russell 

Noel King Sheldon 



'. Cahill 
.ced to 
rsity 

'resident 



1837 



Degrees 



*As of the Class of 1954 



ering 






15 Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineer! g 

IS Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 

32 Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 



William David Shenk Robert Creedon Tashjian 

Sheldon Robert Simon Marcia Tompkins 

Donald Hughes Sottung Richard Raymond Torchia 

Herbert Stone John Michael White 

Richard Charles Stone Ralph Elmer Willard 
Richard Crosby Swain 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE 

Richard Wellington Chase Louis Emmonds 

Robert Elwood Tenney 



*As of the Class of 1954 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Summa Cum Laude 
Gerald Andrew Chrusciel 



.SS. 



1837 



Anthony Walter Bernatowicz 



Donald Frank Adeletti 
George Byron Allen 
Andrew Ransler Bartholomew 
Rodney Noye9 Bencks 
Daniel Stewart Bobrick 
Ernest Edward Bourque 
Burnett Francis Brainard 
James Edwin Brainard 
John William Brazil 
George Seabury Broadbent 
Lester Jordan Broverman 
Donald Lambert Brown 
Gordon Thomas Brown 
Thomas Michael Cahill 
Daniel Robert Callaghan 
Richard Irving Carney, Jr. 
Robert Edward Chalue 
George Francis Chandler, Jr. 
Arnold Paul Chirichetti 
Robert James Clark 
*Thomas Anthony Cocco 
Edward Henry Cohen 
James Patrick Coleman 
James Peter Connor 
Emily Marguerite Cook 
Alan Gould Cotton 
Clifford Alden Currier 



Cum Laude 



Rite 



Edwin Michael Presnal 



Alfred Stacker Daviau 
John Kersey Delahunt, Jr. 
John Philip Donnelly 
Donald Kenneth Duval 
Stephen John Dwyer 
Dino Peter Equi 
John Martin Flynn 
Thomas Edward Fox 
David Ganz 

Richard Atwood Gardner 
Bernard Arnold Gold 
Irwin Leonard Goodchild, Jr. 
Charles Henry Gould 
Henry Walter Grunbaum 
Marie Louise Hanlon 
Edward David Hanson 
Richard Edward Hennessy 
John Kenneth Holmer 
Kent Crosby Hutchinson 
Martin I. Isenberg 
Thomas Richard Judge 
Edwin Francis Kerr 
Orvis Franklin Kinney 
Richard Daniels Klingler 
Charles M. Lasky 
Irwin Lewis Less 
Norman Lewis Levenbaum 



r . Cahill, 
iced to 

irsity 

'resident 



Degrees 



*As of the Class of 1954 



;ering 



& 



15 Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineer' 

IS Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 

32 Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 



Paul Herbert Levenson 
Roger Thomas Livas 
Abram Joel London 
Donald Frederick MacPhee 

*Robert Francis Maliff 
Edward Joel Maltz 
Thomas Joseph McClure 
Benjamin Beatty Merrill 
Marilyn Clark Miller 
David Stephen Mooney 
Thomas Andrews Morrison 

*Henry Mosychuk 
Jacob Neusner 
Bruce Raymond Nilsson 
Robert Stanley Odams 
William Harry Pappas 
Allen Kent Paro 

*Irving Thure Pearson 
Robert John Pelosky 
Richard Morini Pescosolido 
Ronald Stanley Prentice 
Robert Francis Reagan 



Marion Charlotte Roberts 
Betsy Robinson 
Donald Rodenhizer 
Victor Rosenberg 
Ronald Joseph Runstein 
E. Richard Rutfield 
Posidon George Sabanty 
*James Dawes Smith 
Robert Warren Sowerby 
James Francis Sullivan 
Philip James Tarpey 
Russell Charles Taylor 
Maureen Ellen Urton 
Howard Wheeler Utman 
Richard Wotherspoon Wallis 
Edward Eliot Waxman 
Richard Gary Wolff 
Raymond Harry Wood, Jr. 
Paul Wayne Woodbury 
David Bronson Woolley 
Frank Yesu 



*As of the Class of 1954 



SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 



Rite 

Douglas Colton Cornfoot 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 



ss, 



John BaroQ 



Raymond Arnold Bochman, Jr. 
Donald Wright Gorman 
Robert Briggs Hatton, Jr. 



Cum Laude 



Rite 



Stephen Fredrick D'Urso 



John Henry Mahar 
Joseph John Shay 
Alfred Dominic Thagard 



Clinton Zalkind 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING 



. Cahill 
ced to 
rsity 

resident 



Rite 



Donald McLean Bell 
*John Gerhardt Bestgen, Jr. 
Richard David Carignan 
Frederick Edwin Crory 
Robert Goodwin Field 
Ronald Wallace Frost 
Carlo Richard Fusini 



Peter Conrad Wirth 



*Robert Leonard Haggerty 
William James O'Brien 
Jerry Bernard Sherman 

*Milton Clarence Taft 
Robert Irving Taylor 
David Joseph Tierney, Jr. 
Kenneth Knight Wilde 



1837 



Degrees 



*As of the Class of 1954 



ering 
g 



15 Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineer' 

IB Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 

32 Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 



r 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Magna Cum Laude 
Robert Roderick Brown 



Rite 



Robert David Bilodeau 
Robert Sherman Cohen 
Richard Thomas Cowern 
*Louis Richard Glinka 
John Charles Goclowski, Jr. 
David Alan Goodall 
Charles Thomas Harrington 
William Francis Kennedy 
Henry Franklin Kerr, Jr. 



Alvin George Lemack 
*Louis Henry Marshall, Jr. 
William Anthony Owczarski 
Stephen Frederick Owen, Jr. 
Francis Samuel Perrone 
William John Rattman 
Robert Frederick Trocchi 
Gordon Locke Tucker 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 



Cum Laude 
Raymond Otto Bagley, Jr. 

Rite 

Ronald Eugene Babineau 

Lorenzo Peter Benet 
♦Philip J. Burne 

Harry Jean Charette 

Arthur Eleodore Dudevoir, Jr. 

Robert John Equi 
*Terence Michael Patrick Farrell 

Mario Herbert Fontana 

Charles Joseph Gaetz 

Richard Seaverns Gould 
*WilIiam F. Kearney 

Charles A. Laren 

Robert Lucien Levesque 

William Hutchins Lyons 

Thomas Fulton MacLaughlin 

Frederick Wilson Tompkins 



Vincent Joseph Mazzaglia 
Philip Richard McCarthy, Jr. 
James Howard Patrie 
John James Pavlovich 
Donald Franklin Phillips 
Edward Robert Pierce 
Stanley Jacob Sarfaty 
Earle Sanford Sears 
George Albert Smith 
Edward Solomon 
Raymond John Spahl 
Frederick Alden Spencer 

*Robert Ernest Steere, Jr. 
Eugene Dollard Veilleux 

*Charles Edward Vredenburg 



*As of the Class of 1954 






1837 



Betsy Louise Biggar 



Claire Susan Adams 

Jo Ann Allen 

Irene Marie Audet 

Marie Jeannette Barlow 

Judith Bartlett 

Joan Hoxsie Bell 

Carol P. Belval 

Joan Ellen Bonnallie 

Janet Kallgren Boutilier 

Bette Hempstead Bradshaw 

Miriam Edith Bradshaw 

Lois Evelyn Call 

Janet Marie Christensen 

Flora Sharp Coleman 

Mary Lou Couch 

Lesley Gail Crowson 

Constantina Darras 

Sylvia Mae Day 

Marie DiSilva 

Anne Louise Donachie 

Mildred Velleman Feldberg 

Barbara Fredman 

Clara Kathryn Goslee 

Judith Gustavsen 

Karin Christina Gustavsen 

Elizabeth Marie Hall 

Martha Ann Haynes 

Priscilla Ann Hayward 

Doris Frances Hesselton 

Barbara Jeanne Holbrook 

Anne Lee Jepson 



SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS 

CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 



Magna Cum Laude 

Evelyn Elizabeth Lewis 

Cum Laude 

Rite 



.ss. 



*As of the Class of 1954 



Barbara Edith Curtis 



Marilyn Ann Jones 

Ruth Nancy Judson 

Barbara Jean Kimball 

Lora Anne King 

Ethel Kleimola 

Virginia Patricia Krukley 

Joan Eileen Larwood 

Dorothy Ann Lecznar 

Judith Ann Mahoney 

Judith Marion Marland 

Patricia Guyer McCarthy 

Janet Moon 

Frances Eleanore Mulcahy 

Carol Ann Murphy 

Carol Longmore Norman 

Geraldine Maryanita O'Connor- 
Constance Olaussen 

Anne Marie Parnin 

Lilla Agnes Parsons 

Joanne Perry 

Priscilla Anne Pittman 

Mary Adele Sadler 

Hilda Eva Sluckis 
*Sheila Sydne Spooner 

Janice Charlotte Swartz 

Susan Findley Tucker 

Shirley Ann Tuttle 

Joan Wellington 
*Ruth Montague Wentworth 

Barbara June White 

Cynthia May White 

Carol Hurwitz Woolf 



. Cahill 
2ed to 
rsity 

resident 



Degree: 



ring 



15 Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering 

18 Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 

32 Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 



DIVISION OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 



Victor John Bissonnette, Jr. Robert Donald Pedigree 

David Gere Damon Roger Lee Streeter 

Paul Peter DiVincenzo Robert William Vafides 



1837 



CANDIDATE FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

Genevra Goodwin 

CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
MASTER OF ARTS 



Robert Winslow Bullard 
William Abraham Damerst 
Robert W. DeLand 
William Burnham Foster 
Wavne Franklin Frair 
Richard Frederic Gibbs 



Richard Francis Henchey 
Lorraine Doris Lavallee 
Jack Roseman 
Ramon Carlfred Scott 
Frances Elizabeth Sutcliffe 
Ana Margarita Veum 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
MASTER OF SCIENCE 



Roy A. Allen 
Harold Irwin Basch 
Floyd Oris Blackwell 
Edward Joseph Bourdeau 
George Frank Bush 
Catherine Louise Carney 
Catherine Mary Carr 
Parviz Darviche 
John Paul Dusza 
Paul Dona Duval 
Paul Eck 

John Clayton Fisher 
Oliver Simeon Flint, Jr. 
Ruth Allaire Flint 
David Anthony Fuccillo 
Marcel Gagnon 
Lester Everett Garvin 
Marvin Elihu Gilbert 
George Wallace Graham 
Norman Greenfeld 



Arnold Gurwitz 
Donald Chisholm Hagar, Jr. 
Joseph Copley Harrington 
William Daniel Haskins 
Robert Alexander Hay 
Gordon Mckenzie Hayes 
Marilyn Ann Hemmert 
Henry Hoschander 
Herbert Colby Hutchings, Jr. 
Richard Field Jackson 
Milton Kaplow 
Aaron Bernard Karas 
Carolyn Helen Kendrow 
Rauno Andrew Lampi 
Edward Ralph Lavagnino 
Arthur Edgar LeBlanc 
Harvey Robert Levine 
Donald Lewis McLean 
Mourad Amin Megally 
Donald H. Melloon, Jr. 
Francisco Pacheco Mendivil 



Cahill , 
ed to 
sity 

ssident 



Degrees 



*mg 



15 Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering 

18 Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 

32 Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 



Louis F. Michelson 
Eugene John Misiaszek 
M. Michael Muzyka 
Anand Gopinath Naik Kurade 
Neil Linwood Norcross 
George James Oberlander 
James Edward O'Brien 
James Thomas O'Donnell 
Harry Charles Pappas 
Richard Sheldon Patterson 
Cynthia Wilkin Percy 
Gerald Pributsky 
Susan Manley Price 



John T. Reynolds 
John William Rhyne, Jr. 
Alexander Ritchie, Jr. 
Alan Lawrence Rotman 
Nelson James Sarris 
Edward Hartley Seadale 
Gildo Joseph Servadio 
Norman Wesley Silcox 
Peter Czar Oliver Thompson 
Lincoln A. Turner 
Richard J. Volungis 
Robert Cushman Webster 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



Robert William Banks 
John Joseph Benoit 



Leo Joseph Golash 
William Daniel Murphy 



CANDIDATE FOR DEGREE OF 
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING 

George Joseph O'Hara 

CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 



Willard James Flynn 



William Francis Higgins 



CANDIDATE FOR DEGREE OF 
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 



Robert Kincaid Patterson 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Milton Paul Baldauf — Food Technology 
Robert Vincent Decareau — Food Technology 
Abdel Tawab El Mohandes — Food Technology 
John George Erhardt, Jr. — Chemistry 
Warren Irving Johansson — Entomology 
John Joseph Keane — Chemistry 
Tilford Day Miller— Food Technology 
Laurent Ouellet — Food Technology 
William Duncan Powrie — Food Technology 
Popkin Shenian — Chemistry 
Walter Joseph Sydor — Chemistry 



1837 



Cahill 
;d to 
sity 

fsident 



RECIPIENTS OF HONORARY DEGREES 

Willard Anson Munson — Doctor of Agriculture 
Carl Edward Frederick Guterman — Doctor of Science 
George William Edman — Doctor of Humane Letters 
Charles Mason Powell — Doctor of Laws 
George Murray Campbell — Doctor of Laws 
Frank Prentice Rand — Doctor of Humane Letters 



Degrees 



■mg 



15 Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineer' 

18 Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 

32 Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 



HONORS 



Elected to Phi Kappa Phi in 1955 



Raymond Otto Bagley, Jr. 
John Baron 
Anthony Bernatowicz 
Betsy Louise Biggar 
Robert Roderick Brown 
Lyndon Belmont Carew, Jr. 
Gerald Andrew Chrusciel 
Louise Mae Cooley 
Barbara Edith Curtis 
Allen Webster Dickinson 
Joel Paul Douglas i 
Stephen Fredrick D'Urso 
Nadia Fedoryshyn 
Richard Warren Fessenden 
Ronald Joseph Fitzgerald 
Elinor Doris Freedman 
Norman Alan Fulton 
Chester Anthony Giza 
Ruth Elna Haenisch 
Ina Althea Hettinger 
Richard Hadley Holm 



Nancy Bissell Wyman 



Edward William Hughes 
Joseph Vincent Jacintho 
Paul Chester Killam 
Harriet Alfreda Lane 
Jonathan Page Lane 
Evelyn Elizabeth Lewis 
Henry Paul Monaghan 
Betty Marilyn Munch 
Lawrence Paros 
Jean Elizabeth Pruyne 
Robert Henry Ruf, Jr. 
William Irving Savel 
Walter Barton Schwimmer 
David Elmer Seymour 
Charlotte Nadia Sherbrook 
Barbara Jean Smith 
Sally Roberts Spurling 
Barbara Joan Strachan 
William Everett Todt 
Marjorie Jean Vaughan 
Joan Margaret Whittemore 



Catherine Mary Carr 
Norman Greenfield 
Arnold Gurwitz 
Lorraine Doris Lavallee 



From Graduate School in 1955 



Louis F. Michelson 
Cynthia Wilkin Percy 
Ramon Carlfred Scott 
Peter Czar Oliver Thompson 



Elected to Sigma Xi in 1955 



Raymond Arnold Bochman, Jr. 
Robert Roderick Brown 
Louise Mae Cooley 
Allan Webster Dickinson 



Mario Herbert Fontana 
Richard Hadley Holm 
Jean Elizabeth Pruyne 
Estelle Dina Shuster 



Joan Margaret Whittemore 



Phi Beta Kappa Scholar 
Richard Warren Fessenden 



Phi Kappa Phi Scholar 
Richard Warren Fessenden 



1837 



Departmental Honors 

George Byron Allen in Finance 

James Robert Anderson in Landscape Architecture 

H. Philip Auffrey in History 

John Baron in Chemical Engineering 

Gerald Andrew Chrusciel in Industrial Administration 

Louise Mae Cooley in Zoology 

Allan Webster Dickinson in Mathematics 

Joel Paul Douglas in Zoology 

Stephen Fredrick D'Urso in Chemical Engineering 

Richard Warren Fessenden in Chemistry 

Charles Johnson Gatchell in Forestry 

Ronald Gottesman in English 

Richard^Hadley Holm in Chemistry 

Paul Chester Killam in Landscape Architecture 

William Carl Koch, Jr. in Mathematics 

Harriet Alfreda Lane in Agricultural Economics 

Jonathan Page Lane in Economics 

Clyde Leonard MacKenzie, Jr., in Wildlife Management 

Thomas Andrews Morrison in Accounting 

Paul Robert Natale in Forestry 

Jean Elizabeth Pruyne in Zoology 

Richard David Putnam in Forestry 

Richard Walter Rice in Chemistry 

Robert Henry Ruf, Jr. in Olericulture 

William Irving Savel in Economics 

Walter Barton Schwimmer in Zoology 

Edward Sharpies, Jr. in English 

David Lawrence Shores in Zoology 

Estelle Dina Shuster in Zoology 

Barbara' Jean Smith in English 

Edward Martin Swartz in Government 

William Everett Todt in Floriculture 

Marjorie Jean Vaughan in Sociology 

Chandler Howard Waterman in Psychology 

Joan Margaret Whittemore in Psychology 



Special Award of Prize Books for Outstanding Work in 
Italian from the Italian Government to : 

Yolanda Roberto 



:.ahill , 
:i to 
i-ty 

sident , 



Degrees 



• rig 



15 Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering 

18 Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 

32 Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 



TEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF SEMI-ANNUAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
June 4-> 1955, 10:30 a.m., Butterfield House, Amherst, Mass. 
Chairman Bartlett presiding 



PRESENT: 



Trustees Bartlett, Boyden, Brett, 
Brown, Miss Buxton, Cashin, Crowley, 
Haigis, Taber, ¥hitmore, President 
Mather, Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
Burke 



It was 



1837 



VOTED : To dispense with reading of the call and 

reading of the minutes of the last meeting. 

Dr. Shannon McCune, Provost elect, and Dr. Fred V. Cahill r 
Dean of the College of Arts and Science elect, were introduced to 
the Trustees. Chairman Bartlett welcomed them to the University 
and invited them to stay for the meeting. 

On the recommendation of the faculty and of the President 
it was unanimously 



VOTED : To award the following degrees to the 
candidates as listed on the attached 
Commencement program for 1955 and in- 
cluding Magar Bedrosian whose name has 
been added in ink to the printed list. 

College of Arts and Science 
211 Eachelor of Arts 
116 Bachelor of Science 

School of Agriculture and Horticulture 
73 Bachelor of Science 
3 Bachelor of Vocational Agriculture 

School of Business Administration 

100 Bachelor of Business Administration 

chool of Engineering 

1 Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Engineering 

9 Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineerii 

15 Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering 

18 Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 

32 Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 



Degree: 



1838 



TRUSTEE 



Lotta 

Crabtree 

Fellowship 



Keyser, Carl 
A., Professor 
of Metallurgy 



Fraker, 
Charles F. 
Emeritus 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



School of Home Economics 
66 Bachelor of Science 

Divis ion of Physical Education 
6 Bachelor of Science 

Total - 650 

On the recommendation of the faculty of the Graduate 

School and of the President, it vas unanimously 

VOTED; To award the following degrees to the 
candidates as listed on the attached 
Commencement program for 1955- 

1 Bachelor of Landscape Architecture 
12 Master of Arts 
66 Master of Science 

4- Master of Business Administration 

1 Master of Science in Civil Engineering 

2 Master of Science in Electrical Engineering 
1 Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering 

11 Doctor of Philosophy 

Total - 93 

On the recommendation of the Graduate School Committee 

and of President Mather, it was 

VOTED : To continue Ralston B. Fead, Ph.D. candidate 
in the Department of Bacteriology, as the 
Lotta Crabtree Fellow for a 10 months' period 
beginning June 1, 1955 with the understanding 
that Mr. Read will receive $2,000 payable 
from the Lotta Crabtree fund during this period. 

On the recommendation of President Mather, it was 

unanimously 

VOTED : To promote Carl A. Keyser from Associate Pro- 
fessor to Professor of Metallurgy effective 
September 1, 1955. 

On the recommendation of President Mather, it was 



unanimously 



VOTED: 



To name Charles F. Fraker - Professor of 
Fomance Languages Emeritus - effective on 
his retirement August 31, 1955* 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was agreed that the budget meeting of the Board would 
be held at the University on June 24-. 

On the recommendation of the University Committee on 

Naming of Buildings and also on the recommendation of the President 

it was unanimously 

VOTED ; To name the new Classroom Building - Machmer 
Hall - in honor of Dr. William L. Machmer, 
who served as teacher and Dean of the Univer- 
sity for a period of 4-2 years. 

Secretary Burke read letter dated May 30 from The United 
Christian Foundation, Inc. of Amherst, Massachusetts transmitting 
vote of that group to the President and the Trustees of the Uni- 
versity concerning their views on religious facilities for Univer- 
sity students. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that he has received an addi- 
tional $.2100 from Alpha Sigma Phi fraternity. This has been added 
to the College Shakespearean Club, Alpha Sigma Phi Scholarship Fund 
established by the Executive Committee of the Board on A.pril 26, 
1955. 

President Mather distributed copies of letter which he 
had written on May 26, 1955 to Mr. Eobert Leavitt, Secretary of the 
Alumni Association. In this letter the President set forth his 
views concerning support of the Alumni Association from tax funds. 
The President feels that any Alumni Association should be self- 
supporting but that he will continue the present level of state 
support for a further period so that the Association can develop 
its program to the point where it may stand on its own feet. Copy 
of the letter is attached to these minutes. 



1839 



Machmer 
Hall 



United 
Christian 
Foundation 
Inc. 



College 
Shake spearean 
Club 



1840 



I 



TRUSTEE 



Morgan 
Horses 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The Trustees discussed, the Alumni position at length and 
Chairman Bartlett asked each Alumni-Trustee to express his views. 
Each one stated his agreement -with the Presidents philosophy. 

President Mather distributed copies of a statement of 
general policy for Morgan horses at the University of Massachusetts 
Copy is attached to these minutes. 

President Mather complimented Treasurer Johnson for the 
outstanding administrative ability he has shown during the past 
year when two top positions in the University were unfilled. He 
said the Treasurer has served far beyond the call of duty not only 
as Treasurer but as leader of important committees of the faculty 
and in accomplishing research on administrative problems of the 
University. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12 o'clock. 



~T 





Secretary 



Mv>-T?o^t^uL^u, 



Chairman 



xm ?BsiTir of ms&MsmsmTB 

9 Massachusetts 

Office of the Presides t May 26, 1955 

lr e Bsbert Leavitt, Secrete 



*&KpUS 



>e&r Mr« ^eavitts 

Baring the process ^dtadaistrative review, of the University of Massachusetts 
mdget fw I9&5-ST 1 Bote ti lie Alnsuni Association has requested increases in state 
impropriations. I an cutting all tlwm respests back to the minimum of toads actually 
>rofl« during the opera*! r 1954-55* this letter is- written to clearly state * 

gr policy position for thii -.'doa. 

As a ccsat&- anil long-mage policy, this Admini strati on is opposed to t&x 

rapport for Alvoani Association activities* W® are continuing only that amount of 
support which has hem inherited from previous A&B.imistratiosss 3 but 1 am firmly opposed 
jo way increase in m&h support and in JM 2®MzHM§ •■ opposed to any public funds 
support at all e Alumni agg ms are founded thfoughodt the country, 1 belldve, 

vs. the ftsstuqpticn that slnoosi groups h&v© an inherit loyalty related to their oun ' 
tigh regard for what the institution has done for them, and that this loyalty is 
iranslated into tangible form by increasing voluntary contributions as the financial 
status and motivation of the individual dictates such contributions in the years after 
;radmticm* The position g &>lie tas*snpp@rted institution in this field is ®wm 

ore defl&lteiy related to the »Xqyeity" concept that I have mentioned above in that 
fee state actually subsidises^ and very heavily per person, the instructional cost© 
'or each student in attenda '.-iring the entire period of' Ms undergraduate career* 
tliinfe tftat it is sound operating policy to maintain that an alumni association of 
lifter a public or a private institution should be entirely self-supporting to justify 
ts existence at alio As one ©f sis presidents chosen on a national basis to attend * 
he special ccmferesic© on alrami association policy in Bretton Woods on June 27, 28, 
r4 29 of ills year, I intend to reaffirm this position as that of this Administration 
nd on© in s&ich I believe there should be general policy concurrence evea at the 
ational level*' 



B^ond general policy and to tarn specifically to the Culvers! ty of Mass** 
husetts situation, 1 feel," as a specific easample, that the alumni majmsine, which is 
fee inf ©national or^n for the Alumni Association, would lose botfe its effectiveness 
nd its basic policy fresstai as m informational device to alumni if the Alumni 
ssociatioa in gsaeml were supported to my great extent by tasc f\mds a At the current 
ritiag I m requesting, im successive budgets, funds to support an adequate public 
elatioas program for fee University, Our own public relations staff consists of two 
eoplsg and our real wrk in this field has been ftamperei for years by lack of adequate 
Bads to eves inform the tsx-supporting public as to the actual nature of our services* 
arricnlar and extra curricul&r. It would seem to me extremely unwi.se to be supporting 
at of tax funds my further expenditure for the Alumni Association on a public relations 
i-sis when our own service is so inadequately cared for 



I 



B6b®rt Leavitt 

M&$ 26* 1055 



a great ditl^^™* J^STK. *£* M !** ^ TOralt ? •— «- Associate 

♦uTiv. i. """S ™ 8 y»*rs of /eur EteimistpiitifHj for the iaforaatieoal ssrwiea 
that tataj. provided th^gh 3 w office «» M«b «d hrtlidvs. S^TSaS 

Se?«£^ sanrics as a jolmtery tartt. of IsyUty, or help to the S^^tr 

k«J?J?!? * the University, and we have not prodded it only becausewe 
have oat had adequate funds ia the total target* oec«i.»e we 

busioess eLStt™« < ^ i , eithe!,s ^* ^^"^ A SS oe* a ti« should be ^gaging la 

«™!S£,?T T ^ e 0M1SMS fw pro "* *° <*<> Association «hm such bSliesa 

tESSZUijyZ *"?' U ? liTO the taiWi »S* ^ ■«««-» of peep!. whTIre ^14 

»c/SeS «,e Si' i! StoFt ' *f " 0t b f ieVe tfeat M - 1 — * Elation »eS 
TSiWb *hT* 4 ^T °!T a0 Jt ars ^"iag to support it completely. »» P 2 

IbeUere that in the present short budget situation of the BaiTersite w. can *L«1V 

aay extra eapeuditares during a traasitioa period. I an fimly c«viaeM tfa^ft* 

Stoc®rely years. 

/»/ J. Paul Mather 
Presldai 

jpih. 



STATEMENT OF 
GENERAL POLICY FOR MORGAN HORSES 

AT 
THE UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



1. The University of Massachusetts maintains a small breeding herd of 
Morgan females plus one service stall: on.. The inventory as of 
October I of each year vvll be held to 10 females of any age plus 
one stallion. These 'nventory numbers may be increased during the 
late spring amd summer months by the foals born each season. 

2. The breeding program will be established bv joint action of the 
Department of Animal Husbandry and the University Farm Department. 
This includes the mares to be bred, time of breeding, stallion to be 
bred to, etc. 

3. The Morgan horses are to be stabled in the barn north of Grinnell 
Arena, said barn to be known as the Horse Barn, 

Ur. All use of the Morgan horses for class-, experimental and other pur- 
poses is subject to the stipulations contained in the Statement of 
Policy for the Animal Husbandry Department as of January 8, 1955* 

5. The horseman and his relief are under the immediate jurisdiction of 
the Assistant Farm Superintendent, Mr. Kinsman,, and in His absence, 
they are under the jurisdiction of the farm superintendent, mr , 

bla i sdell. 

6. All written publicity relative to the horses shall issue from the 
Farm Superintendent, Mr. Blaisdell, or hss Assistant, Mr, Kinsman, 
or the Head of the Dairy and Animal Sc-'ence Department,, 

7. The Morgan horses are maintained at the University of Massachusetts 
for the following purposes. 

A. TO PROViDE LABORATORY MATERIALS FOR DERTAiN DaIRY AND ANIMAL 

Science Department courses. 

b. To provide animals for experimental and demonstrational purposes 
as determined jointly by the Dairy and Animal Science Department 
and the Farm Department. 

c. To provide stallion service wherever feasible to light horse 
breeders under stipulations laid down by the farm superintendent, 
Mr. Blaisdell, by the Assistant Farm Superintendent, Mr. Kinsman, 
and the Dairy and Animal Science Department. Arrangements for 
breeding outside mares must always be made through Mr. Kinsman 

or Mr. Blaisdell. 



M 



'5 ■ 



-P. =~EE 



UNIVERSITY CF MASSACHUSETTS 



MIXLTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
June 24, 1955, 2:0O p.m., -Dining Cordons, — mherst, Mass, 

Chainan ^artlett presiding 



??ESE>'T : Trustees Bartlett, Bayden, Brett, »4iss Buxton, 
Crowley, Kaigis, Hawes, Iaber. '^rutore, Presi- 
dent Mather, Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Burwe 



It was 

VOTED : To dispense witi 
of the minutes < 



reading of the call and reeding 
f the last meetinz. 



On the recommendation of the Co-unit tee on Buildings and 

Grounds it was unanimously 

VC I LP : To employ --_-es and Graves of Boston to prepare work- 
ing plans and specifications for the proposed addi- 
tion to the Library. 

On the rec emendation of the Committee on Buildings and 

Grounds it was unanimously 

VOTED : To employ Shepley, Bolfinch, -ichardson, Abbott of 
3oston to prepare working plans and specifications 
for the proposed Liberal Arts building. 

On the record en dot ion of the Committee on Buildings and 

Grounds it was unanimously 

VTTED: To approve architects for the vegetable gardening 
building and greenhouse in the fallowing priority 
crder: 

1. Clinton uoodwin of Haverhill 

2. Maloney & Tessier of Springfield 

3. rtillia- b, Colleary of Centerville 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Buildings and 

Grounds it was 

VOTED : To enploy Merrill Associates of 3oston to prepare 
working plans and specifications for edditiens to 
the boiler capacity. 



1841 






: 









1842 



TRUSTEE 



Animal 
Health 
building 



Science 
Center 



Vegetable 
Gardening 
building 



Montague 
property 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



On the recommendation of the Committee on Buildings and 

Grounds, it was 

VOTED ; To rescind previous vote naming McClintock and 
Craig of Springfield as architects for the pro- 
posed animal health building. 

And it was 

VOTED ; To name Louis W. Ross of Boston for construction of 
the building for investigation of health problems of 
large naimals and to authorize the Treasurer to enter 
into contract with Mr. Ross in the name of and for 
the Board of Trustees when the $30,000 fund is in hand. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Buildings and 

Grounds, it was 

VOTED ; To authorize construction of the animal health build- 
ing resulting from gift of Miss Harriet G. Bird as 
an addition to the animal holding pens near Paige 
Laboratory. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Buildings and 

Grounds, it was 

VOTED ; To name James H. Ritchie Associates of Boston as 

architect for the second unit of the Science Center 
to make a preliminary study and cost estimate. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Buildings and 

Grounds, it was 

VOTED ; To rescind previous vote locating the vegetable garden- 
ing building near French Hall and authorize the con- 
struction of the building to the west of the engineer- 
ing group and Paige Laboratory. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Buildings and 

Grounds, it was 

VOTED ; To authorize the Treasurer, in the name of and for 
the Board of Trustees, to take up the option which 
the Trustees now hold for purchase of the Montague 
property. 



fRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Buildings and 

Grounds, it was 

VOTED ? To request the Massachusetts Building Association to 
proceed immediately with construction of the remain- 
ing portion of Van Meter dormitory aiming for comple- 
tion date by September of 1956. 



1843 



Van Meter 
House 



On the recommendation of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds 



it was 



VOTED ; That the Massachusetts Building Association defer any 
further construction of dormitories pending future 
authorization from the Board, 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Buildings and 

Grounds, it was 

VOTED ; That the form of lease of one student union building 
by University of Massachusetts Building Association 
to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts pursuant to acts 
of 1939, Chapter 388, as amended or supplemented by 
Acts of 1945, Chapter 390, by Acts of 1946, Chapter 
352, by Acts of 1948, Chapter 185, by Acts of 1950, 
Chapter 414, by Acts of 1952, Chapter 211, by Acts of 
1953, Chapter 356, and by Acts of 1954, Chapter 400, 
said building to be erected by said Association on a 
parcel of land to be leased to it by the Commonwealth, 
be and hereby is approved as presented to this meeting; 
and that the Trustees of the University of Massachusetts, 
or a majority thereof be and hereby are authorized in 
the name and on behalf of the Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts to execute, acknowledge and deliver, in or 
substantially in the form presented to this meeting, 
said lease of one student union building from said 
Association to the Commonwealth and to cause the common 
seal of the University of Massachusetts to be affixed 
thereto. 

It was 



VOTED ; That the form of lease from The Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts to the University of Massachusetts Building 
Association of a parcel of land for the erection of one 
student union building, all pursuant to Acts of 1939, 
Chapter 388, as amended or supplemented by Acts of 1945, 
Chapter 390, by Acts of 1946, Chapter 352, by Acts of 
1948, Chapter 185, by Acts of 1950, Chapter 414, by 
Acts of 1952, Chapter 211, by Acts of 1953, Chapter 356, 



Dormitories 



Student 
Union 

Building 



1844 



TRUSTEE 



Maxwell H. 
Goldberg 



Stowell C. 
Goding 



J. Henry 
Korson 



Clarence 
W. Shute 



Albert E. 
Goss 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

and by Acts of 1954, Chapter 400, be and hereby is 
approved as presented to this meeting; and that the 
Trustees of the University of Massachusetts, or a 
majority thereof, be and hereby are authorized, in 
the name and on behalf of the Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts, to execute, aknowledge and deliver, in 
or substantially in the form presented to this meet- 
ing, said lease of land from the Commonwealth to the 
Association and to cause the common seal of the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts to be affixed thereto. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was unanimously 

VOTED; To promote Dr. Maxwell H. Goldberg from Professor 
to Head of the Department of English, effective 
September 1, 1955. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was unanimously 

VOTED ? To promote Dr. Stowell C. Goding from Professor to 
Head of the Department of Romance Languages, 
effective September 1, 1955. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was unanimously 

VOTED; To promote Dr. Jay Henry Korson from Professor to 
Head of the Department of Sociology, effective 
September 1, 1955. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was unanimously 

VOTED ; To promote Dr. Clarence W. Shute from Associate Pro- 
fessor to Professor of Philosophy, effective 
September 1, 1955. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was unanimously 

VOTED; To promote Albert E. Goss from Associate Professor 
to Professor of Psychology, Effective September 1, 
1955. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 
Program of Study, it wa s unanimously 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To approve the attached new courses and changes in the 
course of study. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was unanimously 

VOTED ; To approve the offering of a new degree, Master of 
Science in Chemical Engineering, and to approve the 
attached curriculum for this degree. 

The Trustees discussed the budget of the University for 
the year beginning July 1, 1956. President Mather reviewed budgets 
of the past few years and said that for the year beginning July 1, 
1955 the initial appropriation from the Legislature will be 
approximately $6,240,000. The University has also requested $388,000 
as a supplemental appropriation covering the same year. The Legis- 
lature is also likely to appropriate $3,637,000 for capital outlay. 

Last year the Trustees authorized a budget of $7,008,364 
for the year beginning July 1, 1955. This year, despite increases 
in fixed costs such as salaries and rentals, the President is pre- 
senting a budget of $7,076,642. He said that initial requests from 
schools and divisions of the University totaled more than $8,000,000 
but that the gap between school and division requests and legislative 
appropriations was getting so large as to give the impression that 
the University budget was a padded budget. The President said that 
after considering the matter carefully, he decided that the Univer- 
sity would be in a stronger position with the Legislature if he 
could present a budget more nearly in line with past appropriations. 

President Mather said that he emphasized this position 
in the hearings with the school deans and division heads, instead 
of negotiating with them item by item, he indicated that he would 

submit an over-all budget for the University closely following last 



1845 



Nev Courses 



Master of 
Science in 
Chemical 
Engineering 



Budget 



1846 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
year's budget and then negotiate as to the amount available for each 

school and division after the budget has been passed. 

In presenting the budget, the President called 
particular <xttention to the needs of the Library for increased staff 
and increased appropriation for books. He discussed the problem 
created by the rapid increase in student numbers and the lack of 
increase in appropriation for educational supplies. This has 
caused the quality of instruction to deteriorate. Problem number 
three as discussed by the President is lack of increase in clerical 
and service personnel as compared with increase in the number of 
students and teachers. Problem number four which deamnds attention 
is the need for increase in the stipend for teaching fellows. The 
University has been paying $1,000 a year for half-time teaching 
fellows while other universities are paying about $1800 per year. 
Problem number five, to which the President called attention, is the 
discrepancy between the appropriation for repairs and the rapid in- 
crease in the total cubic feet of buildings to be maintained. In 
1949 the University had 14.6 million cubic feet of building space 
and an appropriation of $148,000 for repairs. In 1955 the Univer- 
sity had 21.2 million cubic feet of building space and $125,000 for 



repairs. 



After study and discussion of trie budget, it was 



unanimously 



VOTED t To authorize the administration to submit a budget 

of $7,076,642 for maintenance for the year beginning 
July 1, 1956; $50,000 for reimbursable research; 
$25,000 for Commonwealth Scholarships; and $200,000 
for roads, walks and parking areas. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Treasurer Johnson pointed out that it may be necessary 
to make minor changes in the budget to bring sub items into con- 
formity with actions of the current Legislature and the Trustees 
authorized the President to adjust the budget to conform with 
actions of the current Legislature. 

It was 

VOTED: To authorize the President to expend for University 
purposes $1,000 from income from unrestricted trust 
funds for the year beginning July 1, 1955 and to ex- 
pend $500 from the Sprague fund. 

Treasurer Johnson said that there is a cash variance of 

$16.46 in the account of the University cashier who has handled 

between two and three million dollars during the past year. In 

accordance with previous practice, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to clear the cash 
account as of June 30 from the interest from 
agency funds. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4:00 p.m. 



ecretary 



1847 




i/Wii? ckJ~*-asLZa\ 



Chai rman 



Unrestricted 
Trust Funds 

Sprague Fund 



1848 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



TRUSTEE 



University of Massachusetts 



Office Hates May 23^ 1955 

Tot President Jean Panl Mather 

At its meeting on May 20, 1955* the Graduate School Council voted unanimously 
to petition the Trustee® of the University of Massachusetts for permission to offer 

& new degree^ Master of Science in Chemical i&igineering, Xhe proposed program is 
enclosed It includes the following new courses at the graduate level s& 

Master ©f Seifsae® in Chemical fhgineering 
The Requirements* 

1. The training of the candidate on entrance shall be equivalent to the 
requirements for a Bachelors degree in Chemical Engineering from a recognized 

SChOOl e 

2 Graduates of other than a recofpii sed school or in fields other than 
Chemical Engineering to be admitted to the program should show satisfactory 
academic training or demonstrate proficiency in the following subjects as a 
mlnimusu 

Mataessaticss Iti^ough Mathen&tic* 30 or its equivalent 

Chemistry i Organic, An&lytleal*. Physical 

Engineering Mechanics! Statics* Strength of Materials 

Chemical Engineerings Stoi ©biometry, Unit Operations, Th@rmo» 
dynamics, including thermodynamics of chemical change 

Electrical Engineerings Elements of Circuits and Machines 

0o The credit requi reme&ts for the degree ©hall be as prescribed by the 
Graduate School , but at least 12 semester hours exclusive of thesis rossst be in 
the 200 series of courses in Chemical Engineering, and fie courses outside the 

department should be in engineering or physical science* 

4e An acceptable thesis is required* 

The Course*! 

In addition to the courses presently offered for minor credit only, we would 
request authority to give the following courses* As staff members are added with 

special interests and capabilities we would expect to ask for authority to give 
other courses in line with these interests and capabilities*, 

It will be noted that fee courses from which at least 12 semester hours are 
required include Mechanical Engineering 221 which is already available in the 
Graduate School* 



Courses ©pen to Graduate Students Qnlys 

«Chea Eugr, 201 , CHBttGsL MQltimBim IHEEeiaiffNAMlCS Ii A review of the 

fundamental laws of thermodynamics, followed fey a study of some of their appli-» 
cations to chemical engineerings P~¥=-T relations of fluids, thefmodyn&mic fanctions, 
fluid flow, compression and eipansion of gases, liquefaction and separation of 
gases* 3 credits 

SngTs, 181 or equivalent Mr JUlndsey 



mim EkigF*, 202, GRaiXGAL WQlKSSBBaMQ TBBEMmmaCS lis The study ©f phase 

$nd chemical reaction equilibria ©&d their applications in ehe&ieal 

processing are taken up© S credits 

Prerequisites t Chemistry 168, Chem e Ikigro 181 Mr 6 



llssh* &&gr„ 221 s HE&T ZRANSFE&s Intension of elementary principles to more 
advanced problems in steady aiad unsteady state heat transfer as applied to the 
design of process equipment.* Ineln&es basic material on fluid flow and dimensional 
analysis as related to heat transfes* and mass transfer* 3 credits 

Prerequisites Btooh* Eagr* 164 or Mr, Lindssy and Mr» Swenson 

Chaa 6 Esgr 155 

*Cfe®» ingr» 231 , MASS XBA8SFSR Is In advanced study of soae unit operations 
which utilise mass transfer between phase&$ distillation, gas absorption, and 
solvent extraction* Includes a review of diffusion theory and a unified treatment 
of subject matter^ 3 credits 

H&gfo 221 Mr e Cashin 



*Chem Ingr<> 232, MASS TMNSFEE lit Drying, crystallisation and adsorption 
are studied** 3 credits 

Prerequisites Hech s Ebgr» 221 Mr c Cashin 

*Chem Sagr* 300, BSSBABCH THESISs A theoretical or experimental study of 
some chemical engineering problem® 

Credit will be determined by the work done, and by agreement with the Department 
and -&16 Graduate Committee Maximum credit, 10 

fhe staff 

Courses Open -to Both Undergraduate and Graduate Students; 

Chea Bftgr, 182, INBUSSK1AL WILXBEIA AND KINETICS* A study of phase and 
chemical equilibria &&d rates of reaction in chemical processes from the industrial 
point of view* 3 credits 

Prereqnisltess Chemistry 166 s Chem ®agr 6 181 Mr e Batke 

Chem Engr„ 195, PflOCBSS B^JIPMHIT DESIGN s The design of process equipment for 
the chemical industries* r&veted pressure vessels, welded pressure vessels, 
piping, attachments and closures, etc* 2 credits 

Prerequisites! Chem Eagr* 135, Civil Bngr* 153 Ifir* Lindsey 



Eleetiv® Courses 



Electrical ^igineerlag 201* lagi&eering Analysis 1 
Electrical Engineering $02* Ehgi&eering In&iygiis II 



is ulcus 



Mathematics 193* Advanced Calculus 1 
Mathematics 194« Advanced Calcolns XX 

Statistics 1TT C ELsnentary Experimental Statistics 

Chemistry 1T7 8 Advanced Physical Chemistry 

Chemistry 181 „ Organic Chemistry 

Chemistry 1B§ Theoretical Inorganic Chemistry 

Chemistry 203..' Physical Chemical Measurements* laboratory 

Chemistry 205 o Chemical XhemoelyiifiBiics 

Chemistry 306© Gases, liaeties^ CAtalysls 

Civil Engineering &75 Advanced Fluid Mechanics 

Bacteriology 181© General Applied Bacteriology 

Chemistry 214 e Pl^rsieal Chemistry ©f High Polymers 

Chesaistry 237* Biocollolds 

Mathematics 183 » Computational Methods 

Mathematics 156* Finite Differences and Probability 

Meheaaieal Engineering 190» Advanced Metallurgy 

Mechanical Bsgineering 183* Machine Be&lga. 

Physics 185o , Modem Physics 

Physics 180o Modern Physics 



Credit, 
Credit , 

Credit, 
Credit, 
C redit; 
Credit, 

Credi t, 
Credi t, 
Credit, 
Credits 
Credit, 
Credit, 
Credit, 
Credit 9 
Credit, 
C reditu 
Credit, 
Credit, 
Credit, 
Credit, 
Credit, 
Credit, 



3* 

3o 
3o 
3 

3, 

, 3*»5o 
3« 

3o 

3e 

3* 
3o 
3. 
3, 
3, 

«Jo 
iJ e 

3c 



/$/ Gilbert L Woodside 



r a : 












t coll 

P:r ' Logy 5. 

'edit 3* 






- - i« ■ ■ i^, 

, the role of 
■ g systems and 

* Hus* 

1 iborato 

(< 
i © tare, . . cours 

ROSSI 

s 

:-f Lai. ! 
,. ■ and ■ . 

I " 1 (I) 2 (II) El ■ : 

■ oor»oi 

man c< 

... J ••' ' he suggests 

Division o: 

: ad s >p] .ves o: /# 






(6) A new course in Recreation Leadership as follow© * 

RECPEA' HIP Ik (II! 3 RECREATIOJ XffiAM 

Major emphas pon a terra project ir :h stu- 

dent plans a. complete and well-rounded program, to meet the ne<®&&$ 
interests, and abilities of the community which he studied in- 
■t©nsive3,y in Sociology 51 * Classwork involves the discussion of 
orogram p3 principles and resources and the application of 
these in" selected exami as a background for the student 3 © 

guidance in the preparation of his terra project* Because of the 
detailed nature c-f the \ . ary information need@d for a satis- 

factory start on the i- it is to the advantage cf the 

student that he consult i astr-uctor as early as possible, and 
not later than the time of ore-registration* k field trip is re- 
quired. 

5 class hours* 

Prerequisites:, Recreation adership 51* Sociology 51, 

and consent of .rue tor* Cred.it 3* 

(?) To change Recreation Leadership 77 (I) Organising and Conducting 
Caanmnity Recreation as 

recreation leadership 77 (i) organizing and conducting community 
rbc ;:on 

Recreation Leadership 77 (I) Organization and Administration of 
Conmunity Recreation* A study of staff organisation; personnel 

vmitment, training a: upervisionj legal aspects) plannri. 
and malntens< <t areas, facilities, and equipments finances^ 
business procedure, and public relations* A standard procedure 
manual suitable for the and program studies developed 
in Sociology 51 end Reeves Leadership 74- is constructed. 
Attention is -given to public and private recreation agencies* 
A field trip is required-, 

> 3 class hours* 
Prerequisite, Recreation Leadership 74* Credit 3* 

To change Recre&tion Lea ip 78 (I) (IX) Special Problems in 
Recreation as follows* 

RECREATION LEADERSHIP 79 (I) 80 (II) .RECREATION LEAD IP 
GUIDANCE AND "TICE 

Field experience in .nd involvi: 

administrate rocedu in a public or priv. agency of the 
student* s choice withi .ace of the University* 

rvision ■ tamed Jointly Departr. member 
of prof*- jency* Class disci sion of 

pi ms is . -.ded* 

1 class hour . r.e in i*. 

Prerequisite j. Permission of the D®p »nt Credit 



■ 



The following courses in ^"ood Management were approved. This 
general progrsm had been approved last year but the specific courses were 
not given al that time. 

33. (I) FOOD liANAGEMENT. INTRODUCTORY 

An overall study of food services as represented, by restaurants* 
institutions, hotels and clubs, including the Aimed Services* 
Principles of catering and industry requirements. Food economics and 
role of processed foods* Food standards, .grades and regulations • 
Trade practices* Beverage operations and regulations* Elementary 
principles of management* 

3 class hours 

9s00 - 9s 50 M.tf.S"* Credit 3» 

67 (I) FOOD MANAGEMENT. FOOD PREPARATION AID SERVICE, 

Catering; quantity production with commercial types of equipment — » 
baking? sauces $ pastries { radar cookery, Actual participation at 
one of the University's kitchens and in catering at special events* 

1 class hour and 1-4. hour laboratory 

11 8 00 - 111 50 Tfctj laboratory hy arrangement Credit 3* 

68 (II) FOOD MANAGEMENT. KITCHEN ADMINISTRATION. 

A general study of problems arising in operation of a commercial 
kitchen* Attention is given to layouts and floor plans vita 
emphasis on equipment, design, installation, maintenance, sanitation 

and depreciation. Food control and economy. Considerable time is 
devoted to personnel procurement and training problems, job break- 
down and specifications. Various types of table service and high 
lights of dining room supervision are included. 

2 class hours? 1, 2-hour laboratory period. 

11*00 - lit 50 M»F.| laboratory hours by arrangement Credit 3» 

77 (I) FOOD MANAGEMENT. FOOD SERVICE PRACTICES. 

Fractional study of personnel* Duties of managers, stewards, 
cooks, etc* * Menu making f types of catering service. Advertising 
and promotion methods* Requirements for special functions^ Labor 
procurement and policies. Job training and ©valuation. Cost con- 
trols. 

2 class hoursf 1, 2~hour laboratory 

9:00 - 9»50 Tu, Thj l-2hour laboratory by arrangement Credit 3* 

78 (II) FOOD MANAGEMENT. STEKARDING. 

This is a study of practices used by hotels and restaurants per- 
taining to purchasing, receiving, and issuing food, beverages, and 
other supplies » It includes storeroom procedures, issue systems, 
and internal check methods, principles of food and beverage cost 



I 



control, menu planning and pricing, 

3 class hours • 

11«00 ~ 118 50 M.W.F* Credit 3. 

(10) To change Civil Engineering 75 (I) Fluid Mechan3.cs and 76 (I) 
(II) Fluid Mechanics to the following* 

CIVIL MGIKBERXKG 75 (X) (II) FLUID MECHANICS, 

The following topics are considered*- properties of fluids^ gas 
laws * viscosity | static pressure, gages , buoyant forces, dynamics 
of fluids* Bernoulli's theorem, flow in. pipes, orifices, n©zzlee ? 
weirs and open channels, hydraulic similitude and dimensional 
oaalysis. 

Prerequisite, Civil Engineering 52 

3 Class hours Credit 3. 

CIVIL ENG1HSSE1NG 76 (I) (IX) FLUID MECHANICS LAB0BATOBY 

Prerequisite, Civil Engineering 75 or concurrently* 

1 3-hour laboratory Credit 1. 

(11) Reconsideration was given to course Home Economics II (I) Euthenics* 
The Departments of Psychology and Sociology had brought up the question of 
duplication as it appeared in the former write-up and duplication with Home 

Economics SO, At a meeting of representatives of the three departments the 
following write«up was proposed. 

HOME ECONOMICS IX (I) EOTHENICS 

A study of the responsibilities and opportunities of women for the 
improvement of society through creative homemaking, gainful employ- 
ment and effective community participation « 

Headings, discussions and independent research are designed to help 
-the student begin intelligent preparation for accepting the multiple 
roles involved in marriage , parenthood and community citizenship* 

3 class hours. Credit 3* 

The Committee approved the above change with the proviso that it be given 
a two years try-out. At the end of two years either Heme Economics II or Home 
Economics 80 should be discontinued* 



ONIVERSXTY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

DIVISION OF NURSING 



lot Course of Study Committee 
Froms Mary A, Maher 



Hay 17, 1955 



Subjects Sophomore Students who will transfer to Hew York-Cornell or 
Presbyterian Columbia Schools of Cursing — - 60 semester hours 
in Liberal Arts required* 

These collegiate schools of nursing have prescribed prerequisites 
and they restrict the biological and physical science courses and favor more 
courses in social sciences and humanities. 

guggested Curriculum 

Freshman Year 



English 1 
Speech 3 
Zoology 1 
Foreign language 
Chemistry 1 
Math 



Credits 

2 

1 
3 

3 
3 



Soph omore Year 



English 25 
Psychology 26 
History 5 
Sociology 28 
Art 75 



15 



3 

3 
3 



English 2 
Spsech 4- 
Zoology 35 
Foreign Language 
Chemistry 2 
Math 



Credits 

2 
1 

3 
3 

3 



15 



English 26 


3 


Psychology 56 


3 


History 6 


3 


Economics 


ga^«« 


Music 51 



15 



15 






UHIVBRSm Of MASSACHOSKTTS 

STATEMENT OF SPRAOTS FCND 
FOR THE PERIOD JULY 1, 1954- JUNE 30, 1955 



Total Receipts $1,000.00 

Diaburseatents : 

University Cct&aons, 84 Luncheons, International $ 63-00 

Congress - Ruth Totraan 
flotel Statler, 3 Luncheons, Messrs. Hather, 1.3 -80 

Burke and Johnson 
Everett A P Kosarick, 8 Photos, copies of Architect's 13.50 

drawings, 10 pictures of Married graduates 

in President's Office 
Jo Paul Mather, Expenses to Washington, D. C. to 17.29 

interview candidates for Provost 
University Coaaaoas, 6 dinners - Public RXdg, Coaeu 9.00 
University Cowaaons, 15 dinners, Gloucester 14.25 

Fish Conference 
Hotel Statler } 3 dinners - Messrs , Mather, 14 ; 67 

Burke, and Johnson 
Hamilton X Newell, Printing for Inauguration 213.20 
R. W, Kenney, Travel Expenses for Interview as 20.00 

Candidate for Dean of Liberal Arts 
Frank Bailey, M " " " " " 25,00 
Ernest Rartiug, " "" " " " n 20,00 

Charles Cole, Jr. " " " » " 10.00 
Alton H. Guetafsota '» " " " " 20.00 
Paul Pearson, Travel Expenses fro* Washington, 81 90 

D. C. and return for interview 
Elmer West, Expenses fro® Pittsburgh, Pa., and 114,18 

return for interview 
University Coaasons, 48 saeais f->r Prof., Helving 1 s 45.60 

Committee Meetings 
University Ccmaona, 9 taaals for Prof. Helping's 8-55 

Cotswittee Meetings 
Wilfred Stone, Travel Expenses for interview as 20 ,00 

candidate for Dean of Liberal Arts 
Dr. Shannon McCune, Travel Expenses as candidate 28,00 

for Provost 
Dr.> Jamas Hurray, Travel Expenses as Candidate 39,00 

for Provost 
Cerruti Jewelers, Engraving Cups for Western 27,00 

Massachusetts League Student Publications 
Mrs, L. A. Price, 44 Dinners, October 1954 to 43=90 

April 1955 - Prof. Marfeton, Engr. Dept. 



Total Disbursements 861.84 



BALANCE JUNE 30, 1955 $138.16 



My 53 



IFIVXVERSXXf OP MSSA£HuSSTTS 



OISBURSEKS^TS — UHRESXRZCTSD ®890W^gMr TOI8S 

SOR THE PERIOB JUL? 1, 1954- JUKE 30 , 1955 



Burchm BnerRgncy 

Klnsisaa's Studio - 1 Gold Tone Photograph, #23.00 

I Shadow Box Freae 
Anaxi.eAa Psychological Assoc * - Extra Condensation 15.21 

Charges, Albert S. Goss 

Montgomery • s Rosa Gardes - I Corsage for 8 .,00 

Inauguration Bay 

Student Labor for Inauguration 2.10 

Everett A, Xoaariek - Photographs for 9.50 

Inauguration 

Student Labor for President's Reception 61.00 

Arthur Cc Egaa - 'Pictures at Inauguration 6.25 

Student -Teacher Relation Fund 25.00 

University CoMBons - 8 Luncheons 7.60 

Associate alussil - Ro4gers an<£ HeasEiersteia 75.00 

Reception 

Everett A„ Kosarick - Photographs of Ford 8.50 

presentation to University 

University Gwmons - Luncheons 15*00 

Women's City Club - Use of Room for 2.35 

Advisory Council of Wosaen 

University Coaasaon - 3 Luncheons, IK 15. Council 3.75 

Hotel Statlsr - 3 Luncheons, Trustee Heating 14.75 

R. I. Nevell - 400 Posters for University 25.00 

Open Rouse 

Charles Brsssbllla - Tuning Piano in Cage and 8.00 

Old Chapel ._«__. 

Total 



1310,01 



F. E. Read 



Scholarships 



$90.00 



Total 



90.00 



Kill Ian R. Sessions 



American Psychological Assoc. - Extra Cosspeusation 

Charges, R. S. Feldman 
University Coawacns - 3 Luncheons 
University Coupons - 7 Luncheons for Recreation 

Conference 
University Gosstons - 40 Luncheons 
University Cosaons - 8 Luncheons - IJays and Meeus 

Coonittee 

University Gossoons - 6 Luncheons 



3.17 

2.85 
6»65 

6.00 
7.60 

5.70 



1 



. 



FOR TBB'PsUXCiD JULY 1. 1954 -JuHS 30, 1955 



Willie 31 « $at6i«NGi$ 

University Store - 4 Bachelor's Hoods $10.00 

Student -Teacher &©l«tioa 73.00 

Charles Branbllla •*■ Tuning Piano in Chapel 4.00 

University Gc^mon® - 12 Meal a 11.40 

University Gossnons - Luncheons 8.75 

Somen's City Club - 0®a of Eoost for Advisory 6.49 

Council of Sfomen 

Mitchell &oldy Studio - 12 fhotos of Mr, Cahill 15.50 

Mitchell loldy Studio - 24 Photos of Pres. Mather 18.00 



Total $181.11 

Gillian ffhseler 

Mrs. L. A. Price - 3 Luncheons » 7 Pinners $13.03 

University Comacns - 6 Luncheons, State 9.00 

Personnel Officers 

Stuart Parfitt, 2 36 a 48 Vm %ke 4.80 

Kinsnaa'a Studio » 20, 8 x 10 Photographs 60.00 

The Totsn Crier - September Issue 6.00 

Kraushar Press - 1300 Invitations and 35.50 

Envelopes, Faculty Recap t -on 

Kinsman's Studio - 12 Prints of President Mather 9.00 

Everett Xosarick - 10 Reprints "Library" 5.00 

University Cowsaons • 5 Luncheons , Buildings 7.50 

and Grounds Cossiittee 

Hamilton X, Jewell - 100 Prints of Invitations 9.00 

and Envelopes 

Kinsoaa's Studio - 12 Photographs 9.00 

Hasailton 1. Resell - Certificate for Installation 20.00 

of President 

kinsman's Studio -Us 10 Portrait of 5.00 

President Mather 

Lord Jaffery tvm - Prof. Haloing* s Coasaittee 17,51 

Hotel Stetier, 4 -luncheons - Trustees Meeting 26 ..45 

Itibralrie Bnoyclopediqas, Book 2.98 

University Cospscns - Nurses' Group Luncheon 10„45 

Hotel Statlar 3 Luncheons, Trustee Meet lag 15.75 

University Cdsaons, 6 Luncheons 5.70 

University Coasmn*; Luncheons 56.96 

Wossen's City Club - Use of room for Advisory 6.16 

Council of tosen 

Everett Rosaries - Rent of Plane, 5 Air- Views 20,00 

of Campus 

Sveretc Xoaariclr - Picture* s».»ed for Sews Storie* 7,00 

Gerald M. Healy - Travel 45.45 



407.26 



TOTAL DISBURSEMEJTTS - tfMU&'&lCra FUBDS $988 . 38 



COMMOSHSAira SCHOLARSHIP j&*ERNATOS 
According to Rank 



Sept ©a' 



*, 1955 






■Pgi m 



1 

£. S 

5, 



Wiles, Stuart 
Smith, Philte M. 
Lewis, She Men 
Fleming, Neil 

Powers, Thomas 



?;om 



1. 



I 



Caron, Laura M« 

Gooding, Prise J. 
Currier,, Helen 
Kees, Beryl P. 
Grant, Bettylou 
Nelson, Carol ?* 



MSN 

1. 



Hinckley, Hobert L. 

Kay, Eugene V 8 
Jackson, Halo 
Anti^, Arthur iy, 

., Loo J, 



t 



wow 






3- 

5* 



Sad lew, Carolyn. 
Sain, Lois c/ 
Gray, Nancy E. 

Rawlins, -Joan 
Campos, Jane 



4 

«•«« 



Fltohburg 
Brcokline 
Laurence 
Fall River 



Salem 
■Ison 
Worcester 
Hopkintoa 

Wilmington 

Mansfield 

Class 02 



Jamaica Plain 

Worcester 

Kingston 

Walthf. 



SaToy 

Maynard 

Ashfleld 

Hew Bedford 
Oak Bluffs 

Class of 1958 



Worcester 

Worcester 



1V*1 !* 



Sssex ■ 

Middlesex 
Worcester 
Middlesex: 
idlesex 
Bristol 



Suffo? 
Suffolk 

Worcester 

Middle, 



Berkshire 



Franklin 

Bristol 

Bakes 



Major Dent 



Arts & sciences 

Business Admin* 
Arts & Sciences 
Arts & Sciences 
Business Admin e 



Artg 4 Sciences 
Arts & Sciences 
Arts & Sciences 
Business Admin* 
Home Economies 
Horn® Economics 



Arts a Sciences 
Arts & Sciences 
Arts & Sciences 
Arts <fe Science 



. 



Agrio, & Hort* 

is & Seism 
Arts & Sciences 



Art s 



& Sciences 



Home Kconomiog 



HEM 



1- Ball, Stuart A, 

2* 'Pursa, Richard 8* 

3« Nicholson, Norman K, 

«-. bobbins, Lloyd B* 

5. Temple :)©rt K. 



Auburn 
Holyoko 

Amherst 
Braintree 
■sherst 



Worcester 

Hampden 
Hampshire 
Norfolk 
Hampshire 



Engineering 
Engineering 
Arts <& Sciences 
Engineering 
Engineering 



<5 



k'im 



Em 



3* 

I- 

7, 



Staekpol* # Norma L« 



Berfcz*and, Carol A. 
Valenti, Kancy E. 
Flood, Judith A. 
Vezfeaddj wTeaimgtte 
Rlcharag, MargareU 

Huasaa. .wins c 



•»M«pS!SBBBl»l W !.«i^|||MB(fi( a ai < (;,^^ 



Star Bedf©2"d 
Eolyoke 



Bridgevatex* 
OsUaxnrllie 

Millers Fall® 
tforbegtox* 



Bristol 

Hft&o&den 

HampdeA 
Plymouth 

3amatabl© 
Frasdtll 



Arts ft 
ArSa & Sciences 
Arts & Soidnces 
Arts ft 3eidno*0 

torn© is 



£31 



*%\j 



A#%& ft s©ieiiess 

Art® ft Soi@neaa 



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1849 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

September 29, 1955, 3:10 p.m., Hotel Statler, Boston, Mass. 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 

PRESENT ; Trustees Bartlett, Boyden, Brown, 
Cashin, Crowley, Desmond, Hawes, 
McDermott, Mrs. McNamara, Perry, 
Taber, Whitmore, President Mather, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Burke 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and Pro- 
gram of Study, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To appoint Mr. Julian M. Fore as Head of 

the Department of Agricultural Engineering 
effective October 3, 1955 at annual salary 
of $7630. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and Pro- 
gram of Study, it was unanimously 

VOTED; That Professor Fred C. Ellert who has been 
Acting Head of the Department of German be 
confirmed as Head of the Department effective 
September 1, 1955 • 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and Pro- 
gram of Study, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To establish a Department of Speech in the 

College of Arts and Science and name Professor 
Arthur E. Niedeck as Head of the Department 
effective September 1, 1955, with the under- 
standing that he will receive proper increase 
in salary as soon as budget provisions may 
allow. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and Pro- 
gram of Study, it was unanimously 

VOTED ; To establish a Bureau of Government Research 

responsible directly to the Provost and through 
him to the President of the University effective 
October 1, 1955. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and Pro- 
gram of Study, it was unanimously 



Julian M. Fore 



Fred C. Ellert 



Arthur E. 
Niedeck 

Department 
of Speech 



Bureau of 

Government 

Research 



1850 



TRUSTEE 



Degrees 



Charles P. 

Fraker 

Emeritus 



S. Church 

Hubbard 

Emeritus 



Stock 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED ; To approve awarding of earned degrees at 
the end of the summer session and at the 
end of the first semester as well as at 
the annual commencement in June, with the 
understanding that students who complete 
their work at the end of the summer or at 
the end of the first semester be given the 
option of receiving the degree then as 
voted individually by the faculty and by 
the Board of Trustees or of receiving the 
degree at the following June commencement. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and Pro- 
gram of Study, it was unanimously 

VOTED: To name Dr. Charles F. Fraker, Professor 
of Romance Languages Emeritus, effective 
on his retirement August 31, 1955. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and Pro- 
gram of Study, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To name S- Church Hubbard, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Floriculture Emeritus, effective 
on his retirement August 31* 1955. 

On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on Finance, 



it was 



VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth V. Johnson, 
to subscribe to $800, 12-year 3 l/%% convertible 
debentures of the American Telephone and Tele- 
graph Company, using 64. rights now held by the 
Trustees and to sell the remaining 2 rights, 
with the provision that the company hold the 
same and convert to common stock on December 13, 
1955. 

On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on Finance, 



it was 



VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth V. Johnson, 
to convert the $900 of 3 3/4$ debentures due 
December 10, 1965 of the American Telephone 
and Telegraph Company now held by the Trustees 
into common stock of the American Telephone and 
Telegraph Company. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on Finance, 



it was 



VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth W. Johnson, 
to accept the V. A. Bice Scholarship Fund of 
|2,600 and establish it as an Endowment Fund 
of the University with the income therefrom to 
be made available, on an annual basis, for 
scholarships for worthy students majoring in 
the animal husbandry sequence in Dairy and 
Animal Science in either the four-year or Stock- 
bridge School Program. 

On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on Finance, 



it was 



VOTED: That the sum of $7,372.03 received from the 
legacy of Hannah K. Crooke to the Ascension 
Farm School be added to the Ascension Farm 
School Endowment Fund Principal and that the 
income therefrom be used for the same purpose, 
namely the education and training in agri- 
culture of boys resident in Western Massa- 
chusetts. 

On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on Finance 

it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth W. Johnson, 

to approve the disbursements from the Unrestricted 
Endowment Funds and the Sprague Fund for the 
period July 1, 1954- to June 30, 1955 as shown in 
the accompanying reports. 

President Mather said that as a result of University 

recommendations, the Trustees have established two lists of 

Commonwealth Scholarship alternates - one for the college year 1954-- 

55 and one for the college year 1955-56. It was the understanding 

of the President when he presented the 1955-56 list to the Board, 

that this list took precedence over any previous vote. However, 

the University Commonwealth Scholarship Committee felt that the 

students on the 195^-55 list were more deserving of consideration 



1851 



V. A. Bice 

Scholarship 

Fund 



Ascension 
Farm School 
Endowment Fund 



Unrestricted 

Endowment 

Funds 

Sprague Fund 



1852 



TRUSTEE 



Commonwealth 
Scholarships 



L eland, Lars en, 
Bradley and 
Hibbard 
contract 



Veterans 

Administration 

Regulations 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



than those on the later list. They, therefore, brought the tvo 

lists together into one group of alternates listed by classes and 

by men and women. From now on only one list will be brought to 

the Board and it will be understood that this list will take 

precedence over any previous vote. Meanwhile, in order to take 

care of the most deserving students in the proper order, it was 

VOTED : To approve the attached list of Commonwealth 
Scholarship alternates in priority order as 
shown on the attached sheets. 

The President said that the contract for architectural 

consulting service with Leland, Larsen, Bradley and Hibbard of 

Boston expired on June 30, 1955* The University was well pleased 

with the services of Mr. Larsen and feels that the contract should 

be renewed for another year. $1880.4.0 was spent on this service 

during the past fiscal year and it is expected that between $2,000 

and $3>000 may be spent during the current year. On the 

recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED: To authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth V. 
Johnson, to execute an amendment to the 
contract dated November 23, 1954- between 
the Trustees of the University and Leland, 
Larsen, Bradley and Hibbard of Boston for 
architectural consulting service, extend- 
ing the contract for the period July 1, 1955 
through June 30, 1956. 

Treasurer Johnson said that it is necessary to renew 
annually the contracts with the Veterans Administration for educa- 
tion and training of World War II veterans and it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth W. Johnson, 
to execute in the name of the Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts the following con- 
tracts for education and training with the 
Veterans Administration for the college year 
1955-1956. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



1853 



No. V300IV-1364 - Stockbridge School of Agriculture 

No. V3— IV-1873 - Graduate School 

No. V300IV-1876 - Undergraduate School 

Treasurer Johnson said that the University furnishes 

steam for one fraternity, Phi Sigma Kappa, and has done so for many 

years. Apparently the rate has never been revised as costs have 

increased through the years. This first came to the Treasurer 1 s 

attention when the line from the University to Phi Sigma Kappa 

needed repairing. The engineers have studied the steam requirements 

of the fraternity and applied the same cost formula as is used in 

charging steam against the self-liquidating dormitories. Although 

the recommended increase will double the charge made in past years, 

the Treasurer feels that it is the only fair procedure to protect 

the interests of the Commonwealth. After discussion, it was 

VOTED ; To increase the charge for steam furnished to 
Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity to $900 per year 
effective July 1, 1955. 

President Mather said that all vending machines at the 
University except those in the University Store have been the 
responsibility of the University Athletic Council. The net proceeds 
from operation of these machines have gone to the Athletic Trust 
Fund except that where machines are located in dormitories 30% of 
the net has been retained in the Dormitory Social Fund. However, 
the revenue from coin-operated washing machines and drying machines 
has been returned to the Commonwealth although these machines are 
not paid for from Commonwealth funds but are placed in the Univer- 
sity on a concession basis. The President feels that the revenue 
from the washing and drying machines should be handled in the same 
manner as the revenue from the other vending machines. After 
discussion, it was 



Phi Sigma 

Kappa 

fraternity 



Vending 
Machines 



1854 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



TRUSTEE 



Montague 
Property- 



Bureau of 
Government 

Research 



VOTED : To make all vending machines and coin-operated 
washing and drying machines except those in the 
University Store and in the Student Union (when 
completed) the responsibility of the Athletic 
Council. Any proceeds from operation of these 
machines shall enure to the Athletic Trust Fund, 
provided that the policy now in effect of sharing 
the proceeds with the Dormitory Social Funds be 
continued. 

The Treasurer said that Chapter 733 of the Acts of 1955 

has provided the sum of $12,000 for purchase of the Montague 

property and it was 

VOTED: To instruct the Treasurer, Kenneth W. Johnson, 
to take up the option now held by the Trustees 
for the purchase of the Montague property re- 
ceiving in the name of the Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts and the Commonwealth 
a warranty deed to the property for the sum of 
|12,000 appropriated in Chapter 738 of the Acts 
of 1955 for this purpose. 

It was unanimously 

VOTED : To instruct the Secretary to convey to 
Mr. Vinthrop S. Dakin the appreciation 
of the Trustees for his generous act in 
making the Montague property available 
to the University. 

President Mather said that the 1957 University budget 

will need to be amended if the newly established Bureau of 

Government Research is to be continued. The Legislature this year 

appropriated $18,800 to cover operations of the bureau for a 9 

months' period. The amount of $23,000 will be needed for a full 

year's operation in the 1957 budget. After discussion, it was 

unanimously 

VOTED : To authorize amendment of the 1957 budget 
to add $23,000 for the operation of the 
Bureau of Government Research. 

It was unanimously 



1855 



RUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To request the Chairman to appoint a delegate 
or delegates to the annual meeting of the 
Association of Governing Boards of State 
Universities and Allied Institutions. 

There was discussion concerning the possibility of in- 
viting this group to meet at the University in 1956 and it was 

VOTED : To authorize the President to extend invi- 
tation at his discretion. 

The meeting was adjourned at U- 30 p.m. 





^^T^c^Jdbd^ 



Secretary 



Chairman 



1856 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Hotel Statler, December 16, 1955, 12:30 p.m. 
Chairman Bartlett presiding 



PRESENT : Trustees Bartlett, Boyden, Brett, 
Brown, Buxton, Cashin, Crowley, 
Desmond, Haigis, Hawes, McNamara, 
Perry, Taber, Whitmore, President 
Mather and Treasurer Johnson 

Chairman Bartlett announced that Secretary Burke was 

ill and unable to attend the meeting. Accordingly, it was 

VOTED : To elect Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
pro tern, for this meeting. 

It was 

VOTED : To waive the reading of the call and the 
minutes of the last meeting. 

Chairman Bartlett stated that the main item of business 

was No. 7 on the Agenda - Consideration of Ways of Increasing 

Revenue. He stated that the Trustees had received a request from 

Governor Herter, as transmitted through the Budget Commissioner, 

Mr. Bixby, for the Trustees to review ways of increasing revenue. 

He asked President Mather to read this letter and to comment on the 

tuition and fee structure at the University. President Mather 

read the following letter from Commissioner Bixby: 

"Dr. J. Paul Mather, President 
University of Massachusetts 
Amherst, Massachusetts 

"Dear Sir: 

"Governor Herter has asked me to call to the attention 
of the President and Trustees his belief that acceptance 
of the trustees' program for the development of the Univer- 
sity compels a reexamination of the revenue structure. 



1857 



Tuition and 
Fees 



1858 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

"I have had taken off the following figures for the 
six most recent years to show the increased spread between 
total expenditures and total revenue, and have added the 
1956 appropriations and revenue estimate figures, and 
your requests for appropriations and estimate of revenues 
for 1957. 



Fiscal Year 


Exoenditures 


Revenue 


Net Cost 


1950 


4,451,765 


1,241,430 


3,210,285 


1951 


4,563,235 


1,330,484 


3,237,751 


1952 


5,070,938 


1,547,155 


3,523,783 


1953 


5,209,111 


1,699,630 


3,509,431 


1954 


5,447,999 


1,359,388 


3,533,111 


1955 


6,136,667 


1,969,649 


4,167,018 


1956 Approp. 


6,377,339 


2,039,900 


4,337,939 


1957 Request 


7,037,302 


2,150,400 


4,937,402 



"I recall that not very long ago there was a special 
committee which I think included members of the Board of 
Trustees and of the faculty, which was studying the 
question of tuition and other fees. I am not aware whether 
that committee continues to function, but it is my under- 
standing that no recent changes have been made in charges 
to students. If changes have been made, they did not pre- 
vent a substantial increase in net cost between 1954 and 
1955. 

"The Governor feels that we are all committed to a pro- 
gram of continued expansion, and that since this makes 
inevitable progressive increases in appropriations, there 
should be a major attempt made to offset the effect by 
planning something substantial in the way of increased 
fees. He noted also that the construction progrsm now 
underway imposes an additional expense not reflected in 
the operating figures. 

"Since the time for submitting the Governor 1 s budget 
recommendations is almost at hand, the Governor will 
appreciate your prompt consideraH on of his suggestions. 

Very truly yours, 

/s/ William H. Bixby 

Budget Commissioner" 

President Mather explained that the Governor had already 
announced that the Commonwealth was facing a deficit in the General 
Fund for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1956 and that the Uni- 
versity along with other state departments had received a letter 
from the Governor requesting that expenditures be curtailed, 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



unfilled positions be left unfilled and that transfers between 
funds be eliminated so that the greatest amount of current appro- 
priations might revert to the General Fund at the end of the year. 

Commissioner Desmond stated that the teachers' 
colleges and. the Department of Education had received similar re- 
quests to review the advisability of increasing revenue. He 
stated that the tuition for students who are residents of the 
Commonwealth at teachers' colleges is at present $100 per year 
which is the same as tuition at the University. He stated that 
the State Board of Education had not as yet met to consider this 



1859 



recuest. 



Chairman Bartlett oointed out that under present 



law and opinion of the Attorney General the Trustees may determine 
tuition and fees. He said that he had asked President Mather to 
present to this meeting all of the arguments both for and against 
an increase in tuition and fees. 

President Mather then outlined the action that he 
had taken in preparing material for this meeting. He said that 
he had called together all of the deans, registrar and other ad- 
ministrative officials for a complete discussion of the tuition 
and fee structure. He pointed out that the last time that the 
Trustees considered increasing tuition in 1950, the Trustees held 
public hearings which resulted in petition by more than 100 
members of the legislature opposing any tuition increase. At 
that time the tuition was left at $100 for residents of the 
Commonwealth which was the rate that had been in existance since 

1933. President Mather also pointed out that this University is 



I860 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the only state university in the country that does not retain its 
revenue for its own use. Any increase in tuition would mean that 
the amount returned to the Treasurer of the Commonwealth for use 
in the General Fund would be increased but that this would not 
necessarily mean any increase in appropriations for the University 
since the matter of income and appropriations is considered 
separately by the Ways and Means Committee. President Mather also 
pointed out that any consideration of increased tuition and fees 
should be considered in the light of the fact that the students 
are already paying for their board, extra-curricular activities, 
and. room rent which covers not only the cost of operating the 
buildings but also the payment for the self-liquidating dormitories 
which means that the students are, in effect, paying for these 
buildings. In addition, starting in September, the Trustees are 
committed to adopting a Student Union Fee of $20.00 per year out 
of which the students will be paying for the construction of the 
Student Union Building and its operation. 

Mrs. McNamara asked if it would be better if the Univer- 
sity could keep its revenue? 

President Mather replied that it most certainly would be 
but that Article LXIII of the Amendments of the State Constitution 
provides that all revenue must be returned to the Treasurer of the 
Commonwealth. This means that all expenditures must be from state 

appropriations. The only exception to this is the Student Activi- 
ties and Athletics that are handled as Trust Funds under the pro- 
visions of Section 5A of Chapter 75 of the General Laws. 



1861 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Commissioner Desmond stated that, in his opinion, the 
state had a responsibility for higher education the same as it had 
a responsibility for elementary and secondary education, that this 
responsibility was greater now and would become greater in the 
future in view of the fact that the private colleges would not be 
able to provide the education for the increased numbers of young 
men and women who will demand it. He stated that any increase in 
tuition or fees, in his opinion, would be insignificant in solving 
the revenue problem of the Commonwealth and that the state should 
look elsewhere for its revenue. 

President Mather then read the following statements that 
have been prepared to illustrate the case for an increase in 
tuition and fees and the case against such an increase. 



The Case For an Increase in the Tuition and Fee Structure 

1. The tuition has not been increased since 1933, when it was 
increased from ^60 to |100 and certain fees eliminated. 

2. Incomes have gone up during the past twenty years, including 
student employment incomes. 

a. Incomes of lower and middle income groups have 
risen. In some types of activity the increases 
have been greater (after taxes) than increases 
in higher bracket incomes. 

3. Costs have risen including instructional costs per student. 

4.. The State is bearing a disproportionate share of instructional 
costs($522 per student per year). This is true even within 
the philosophy and objectives of public education. 

a. Operating costs also do not reflect debt service 

on bonded capital outlay (buildings and equipment). 

5. Higher education increases income-earning capacity of students. 
Hence this education should entail a greater individual 
sacrifice in anticipation of later benefits. 



£ 



1862 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

a. Modern university training represents specializa- 
tion beyond the concept of legally required 
elementary and secondary public education. 

6. Even though the University does not retain its revenues, 
these revenues supplement tax funds in the general fund 
and reduce the total state tax burden for current costs 
and debt service. 

7. Other state universities are raising their tuition and 
fees. (28 went up this year) 

a. See accompanying table and ranking data. 

b. Note that Massachusetts went down from 31st 
to 37th this year. 

3. Pise in public expectation to pay for higher education. 

9. If Board increases, should apply only to future admissions. 



The Case Against an Increase in the Tuition and Fee Structure 

1. National income data show that 60 per cent of families have 
f4->000 or less annual income after taxes. 

a. Many able youngsters come to the University from 
these low income families. 

b. Private or public scholarships are inadequate to 
really help many of these youngsters toward 
higher education. 

c. National Research Council data and other studies 
show that currently half of upper 15% of high 
school graduates don 1 t go to college and half of 
this upper half don't for money reasons only. 

2. Objective of public higher education is to train able citizens 
for better and more productive lives, regardless of their 
means at time of graduation from high school. 

a. Not purpose to "price away" opportunity on a 
private tuition basis. 

b. Strong arguments often made for no tuition charges. 

3. Students are already buying dormitories for the state in 
addition to tuition and fee charges. 

a. Now paying for housing, recreation (Student Union) 
and food plus part of instructional costs. 

1. Average annual cost per student now over $900. 



1863 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

4-. University as a revenue producer is already "paying more of its 
way" than other state institutions. 

a. Tuition increase will not increase appropriations 
per student - all revenues now returned to General 
Fund. 

5. Higher education particularly heavy burden on large family. 
Trying to educate two or three tougher for type of family 
typically represented at University. (See Registrar's statement) 

6. University should not be made "Scapegoat" for general fiscal 
incapacity of the Massachusetts tax structure at state level. 



a. Tuition per student not related to expansion costs. 
Expansion a function of birth rates and state 
obligation to service at least a comparable future 
proportion of these numbers. 

b. Present buildings are, to great extent, replace- 
ments of obsolete or unsafe structures and costs 
are not attributable to students unless you change 
whole philosophy of public education. 

President father also analyzed the changes in tuition and 
fees at forty-eight state universities based on a survey that had 
just been completed. Of the 4-8 state universities, 28 raised 
tuition and fees in the past two years. Of these, 11 raised them 
less than $10.00, 20 raised them less than $30.00. 

President Mather then discussed briefly the return of 
revenue- from the University in comparison with other departments 
and services of the Commonwealth. He pointed out that about one- 
third of the cost of running the University was returned to the 
Commonwealth each year in income. This is also true of the teachers 
colleges but, of course, is not the case in the Department of Mental 
Health, Public Health or Correction where a very small portion of 
their total cost is returned in revenue. The President stated 
that this comparative study of maintenance appropriations, revenue 
and capital outlay for the periods 1950-1954-* plus projected 



1864 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

capital outlay for 1956-1960, was prepared in answer to criticisms 
that the state university was costing the Commonwealth more than 
was warranted. He pointed out that from 1950 to 195-4 more than 
$61,000,000 in capital outlay had been appropriated for the Depart- 
ment of Mental Health as compared with less than $10,000,000 for 
the State University and that the projected capital outlay for the 
next five years for Mental Health was three times that of the 
University. This raises a question about a fiscal policy for the 
Commonwealth that the Trustees could not be expected to answer but 
should have knowledge of in considering the revenue picture for the 
University. (A copy of this analysis is enclosed with these 
minutes.) 

President Mather then made some hypothetical computations 
of what certain increases in tuition and fees might mean to the 
Commonwealth. An increase of $50.00 in tuition would mean an in- 
crease of revenue of $220,000 per year. The Student Union Fee will 
return $30,000 the first year and a hypothetical increase of student 
rents of $10.00 would mean an additional $25,000 of income. 

Commissioner Desmond reiterated that, in his opinion, 
these increases were insignificant in terms of the total fiscal 
problem of the Commonwealth and that the state should look elsewhere 
for increased revenue. He also stated that, in his opinion, the 
state must be prepared to face much larger expenditures in the 
future for public higher education. 

President Mather presented material that was prepared by 
the Registrar pointing out that increase in tuition would work a 

hardship on many students and many families with more than one 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

student in college at the same time. The total cost of attending 
the University at the present time is between $900 and $1,000 per 
year per student, not counting recreational, clothing and other 
miscellaneous expenses. Any increase in tuition and fees should 
be considered from the point of view of total cost to the student 
as well as income to the Commonwealth. It was pointed out that 
most other schools in increasing tuition also increase their 
scholarship aid to help relieve the burden on the most needy and 
deserving students. President Mather suggested that if a tuition 
increase were considered the Trustees might also wish to consider 
waiving tuition for 10$ of the student body. If this were done 
the present Commonwealth Scholarship Program could be discontinued 
after the present recipients have graduated. 

Mr. l-Jhitmore spoke in favor of the concept of increasing 
scholarship aid and waiving tuition for a certain percentage of 
the student body. He felt that if an increase in tuition were 
made that this additional form of student aid would be necessary 
and that, in his opinion, the Trustees would be justified in 
taking this action. 

Commissioner Desmond thought that the matter of scholar- 
ships should be considered separately from tuition with the Trustees 
receiving specific authorization from the legislature for whatever 
scholarships were granted. He also spoke in favor of providing 
more scholarships for the freshman year than for upoerclassmen on 
the theory that once a student had started college he would find 
ways and means of continuing. 



1865 



1866 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Taber remarked that tuition was going up in most 
private colleges and universities and that he thought that there 
was a general expectation on the part of the public to pay more 
for a higher education. 

Mr. Brett stated that, in his opinion, we were in the 
middle of a great many pressures, that any increase In tuition 
would be little more than a gesture of good will towards the fiscal 
officers of the Commonwealth and that, in his opinion, this was 
not a good argument to justify an increase. He stated that the 
principle should be for the State University to be as liberal as 
possible in providing higher education to all regardless of their 
ability to pay. He recommended that tuition remain where it is 
but that he would be willing to recommend not only the $20.00 Student 
Union Fee but also an increase of" #15.00 per academic year for room 
rents. Mr. Brett reviewed the self-liquidating dormitory program 
stating that the University of Massachusetts Building Association 
was finding it increasingly difficult to provide new dormitories 
with sufficiently large student rooms to meet desired standards 
and that other details of construction have been cut to the point 
where no further economies could be made. In addition, if the 
policy is to be followed of liouidating not only the building but 
also the cost of its operation, the repairs and replacements for 
the buildings that have been in use for fifteen years will be in- 
creasing each year. The basic law does not require the University 
to liquidate the cost of operating the building or its repairs or 
replacements but this has been a policy that has been followed 
since the start of the self-liquidating program. To meet these 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

increased costs and also to provide for a better building, Mr. Brett 
recommended an increase of $15.00 per academic year, bringing the 
room rent from $165.00 to $180.00 per year. He pointed out that 
this vas not out of line with the other New England State Universi- 
ties which have room rents ranging from $175.00 to £200.00 per year 
for similar type of accommodations. 

After further discussion, on motion made by Mr. Brown, 
seconded by Mrs. McNamara, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To establish the following Schedule of 
Student Union Fees, effective with the 
fall semester of 1956 - the fee is to be 
assessed against all students who register 
at the University. 

f-20.00 per academic year (two semesters) 

A 10.00 per semester 

$ 4-. 00 for six weeks' summer session 

$ 1.00 per week for special courses of less than 

one semester 
$ 1.00 minimum fee for other miscellaneous courses, 

institutes, workshops, etc. 

Student Union Fee to be refundable on the same 
policy as tuition and other fees. 

Treasurer Johnson pointed out that the Student Union Fee, 
just enacted, would return £80,000 to the Commonwealth the first 
year in addition to paying the cost of operating the Union. The 
amount returned to the Commonwealth would be increased in future 
years as the amount appropriated for rentals for amortization of 
bonds was increased. 

The Trustees then discussed the matter of increasing the 
room rent and on motion made by Dr. Boyd en, seconded by Mr. Crowley, 
it was unanimously 



1867 



Student 

Union 

Fees 



1868 



TRUSTEE 



Room 
Rents 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To increase the room rent by $15.00 per 

academic year (two semesters), increasing 
the total room rent from SI65.OO to 
"130.00 per year, effective with the fall 
semester of 1956, and to establish the 
following Schedule of Room Rents: 

Schedule of Student Room Rents (all dormitories) 
Effective September \ y 1956 



Academic Year (2 semesters) 

Semester 

30 week courses 

17 week courses 

16 week courses 

15 week courses 

12 week courses 

8 week courses 

6 week courses 

1 week courses 
per day 



$180.00 

90.00 

170.00 

95.00 

90.00 

85.00 

70.00 

45.00 

35.00 

6.00 

1.00 



Chairman Bartlett stated that the last time the Board 
had considered increasing tuition, a committee of the Board had 
held public hearings at the State House. He stated that there 
had not been much time to study the request from the Governor 
that the tuition and fee structure be reviewed. However, he 
pointed out that most of the members of the Board had worked to- 
gether for a long time and thoroughly understood the problems con- 
fronting the University and the Commonwealth in the area of public 
higher education. He asked if any member of the Board favored 
holding public hearings at this time? 

Several members of the Board expressed themselves 
against holding public hearings although there was sentiment ex- 
pressed that the matter should be considered further by a 
committee of the Board. 

Commissioner Hawes expressed himself in being opposed to 
an increase in tuition and objected to the theory that the Univer- 
sity should be used as a source of revenue for the Commonwealth, 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

He also expressed himself as feeling that a student should be ex- 
pected to pay part of his way at the University and so was opposed 
to any idea of completely free education at the University. 

Mr. Vhitmore pointed out that no student received a free 
education at the University inasmuch as they had to pay their room, 
board and extra-curricular expenses. The only thing that the 
state was subsidizing was part of the cost of instruction. 

Chairman Bartlett asked if any member of the Board wished 
to move for a tuition increase? 

Mr. Haigis stated that he felt strongly that all items 
of cost have increased and that some gesture should be made toward 
increasing the revenue for the Commonwealth. In order to put the 
matter before the Board for action, he moved that tuition be in- 
creased by |50.00 per year. 

Mr. Taber seconded Mr. Haigis 1 motion. 

Commissioner Desmond pointed out that there were only 
twelve Trustees present at that time and felt that this matter 
should be given much further study by a committee of the Board. 
He reiterated that it was his opinion that the state had an obliga- 
tion for public higher education, that lower income families had 
had their income further reduced by high taxes making it impossible 
for them to educate their children except where low cost education 
could be offered. 

Mrs. McNamara stated that she was on the committee that 
held the public hearings the last time the tuition matter was con- 
sidered in 1950, that she favored keeping it at ^100 then and 

favored no change at the present time. 



1869 



1870 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Mr. Crowley pointed out that the Board had already in- 
creased the cost to the student by $35*00 in action taken today. 
He stated that he was opposed to any further increase in cost to 
the student until the matter had been studied more thoroughly by a 
committee of the Board. Accordingly, Mr. Crowley moved that 
Mr. Haigis 1 motion be amended to refer it to a study committee. 
Mr. Brown seconded Mr. Crowley's amendment. 

Mr. Taber stated that he had been against an increase in 
tuition in the past but that in view of all other increasing costs 
and wages he felt that something should be done. 

Mr. Cashin stated that he felt that some action should 
be taken to let the legislature and executive officials of the 
state know that the Board was cognizant of the problems involved. 

Mr. Whitmore stated that he saw no basis on which to 
make a fixed dollar recommendation but that the matter should be 
sent to study to determine how much, if any, the tuition should be 
increased. 

Chairman Bartlett asked what basic principle of public 
higher education could be used to justify an increase in tuition? 
He stated that he was opposed to any action based on strategy. 

President Mather expressed the opinion that he had grave 
doubts that any formula could be determined that would provide a 
basis for establishment of tuition at a publicly supported univer- 
sity. The principle was to provide higher education for those who 
could not afford an education at a private college, that tuition 
could not be related to cost of instruction. He pointed out that 

if the University raised its tuition by $50.00 it would have the 
twelfth highest tuition of all the state universities in the country 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



1871 



Mr. Haigis asked why the Trustees increased, the tuition 
to £100 in 1933? 

Mr. Vhitmore stated that he was a member of the Board at 
that time and that the state had requested an increase in tuition 
and that the Board had yielded to it. In so doing, certain fees 
were eliminated so that the actual dollar increase was small. 

Mr. Crowley stated that, in his opinion, public educa- 
tion should be offered to all of those who could not afford it as 
a matter of public policy and that there should be no considera- 
tion of covering the cost of instruction. 

Dr. Boyden expressed the opinion that the state should 
have all of the public education that it could get and that he 
would do everything possible to support this policy. 

Commissioner Desmond asked if it were necessary to act 
at this meeting on the matter of tuition? He stated that he did 
not think that one week's time was sufficient in which to review 
this matter properly and that the matter should be referred to a 
study committee for future action. 

President Mather suggested that the Governor be notified 
of the increase in fees as a result of the establishment of the 
Student Union Fee of ^20.00 and the room rent increase of $15.00 
and that the matter of tuition be referred to a special committee 
of the Board for study and report at the annual meeting. 

The previous motions were withdrawn by their seconds 
and sponsors. 

Dr. Boyden moved and it was seconded and unanimously 



1872 



TRUSTEE 



Engineering 
Building 



Bowker 
Auditorium 



Paige 

Laboratory 

Annex 



UNlVEftSlTY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED ; That the Chairman appoint a committee of 

five members of the Board for further study 
of the question of tuition increase and re- 
port to the annual meeting of the Board. 

Chairman Bartlett opened the meeting to consideration of 
the other items on the agenda. 

Mr. Whitmore reported on the meeting of the Buildings 
and Grounds Committee that was held on the campus on December 14. 
Since there was not a quorum present at that meeting, he was re- 
porting the items as the recommendations of two members of the 
committee for consideration by the full Board. Mr. Whitmore re- 
ported that the following buildings had been inspected and 
recommended that they be accepted on the dates indicated subject 
to certain conditions. It was 

VOTED : To accept the completion of the Engineering 
Building, Mass. State Project U-101, as com- 
pleted in accordance with the plans and 
specifications by the Spinelli Construction 
Company subject to the completion and repair 
of a list of minor items acceptable to the 
Architect, Mr. Appleton, and the Treasurer, 
effective December 15, 1955. 

It was 

VOTED : To accept the Remodeling of Bowker Auditorium, 
Mass. State Project U-501, in accordance with 
the plans and specifications by DeStefano Con- 
struction Company, effective September 1, 1955- 

It was 

VOTED : To accept the remodeling of the Paige Annex, 
Mass. State Project U-4.03> in accordance with 
the plans and specifications by the M. J. Walsh 
Company, effective December 16, 1955> subject 
to further approval of the installation of the 
floor in two rooms to be approved by the 
Architect and the Treasurer. 



?USTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was 

VOTED : To accept, as completed, two Farm Remodeling 
Projects, under Mass. State Project U-502, 
Contract No. 3 - Bedding Storage Addition, 
by the Beaver Corporation, as of September 3, 
1955? and Contract No. U - Bull Barn Improve- 
ments, by D. A. Sullivan & Sons, Inc., 
effective November II, 1955. 

It was 

VOTED : To accept the completion of the Tennis Courts, 
Mass. State Project U-503, Contract No. 3, 
David S. Durant, General Contractor, effective 
May 14-, 1955 j subject to the withholding of a 
guarantee of $3,0^3.00 on the fabric of the 
fence for a period of ten years in accordance 
with the proposal of the sub-contractor, Inde- 
pendent Fence & Iron Works, Inc., of Agawam, 
Massachusetts; this proposal having had the 
prior approval of the Division of Building Con- 
struction and the Comptrollers Bureau. 

It was 

VOTED : To accept the completion of the First Part 
of Van Meter House, Dormitory #13, as com- 
pleted in accordance with the plans and 
specifications, by the University of Massa- 
chusetts Building Association, Inc. 

Mr. Vhitmore reported that the recommendation of the 
Trustees for the appointment of an Architect for the Vegetable 
Gardening Building and Greenhouse for which the University has an 
appropriation of $250,000 was not accepted by the Commission on 
Administration and Finance and that the Commission has najned 
Albert M. Kreider, of Newton, to design this project. 

Mr. Taber stated that he was acquainted with Mr. Kreider 
and that, to his knowledge, his work was most satisfactory. 

Mr. Vhitmore reported that plans for the relocation of 
Beaver Street adjacent to the Valthan Field Station had been 

examined and that a proposal made by the County Comnis si oners for 
this work and for land taking appeared to be in the best interests 



1873 



Farm 
Buildings 



Tennis 
Courts 



Van Meter 
House 



Vegetable 
Gardening 
Building 

and 
Greenhouse 



1874 



TRUSTEE 



Waltham Field 
Station land 



Roads 



Public 
Health 
Building 



Women ' s 
Physical 
Education 
Building 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

of the Commonwealth and the Trustees. On his recommendation, it 

was 

VOTED : To authorize the President and the Treasurer 
to take the necessary action to permit the 
land taking by the County of Middlesex for 
the relocation of Beaver Street. 

Mr. Vhitmore then reported that under a new appropriation 
authorizing the Department of Public Works to construct and main- 
tain highways at state institutions that the University ha.d re- 
ceived a sum of ^22,500.00 for the current fiscal year for the 
construction of roads on the campus. He recommended that the 
Trustees designate the road leading from the foot of Clark Hill 
Road in front 6f Mills and Brooks dormitories and around by the new 
Durfee Conservatory intersecting with Stockbridge Road near Wilder 
Hall with approaches and service roads connecting thereto as the 
area to be constructed by this appropriation. It was 

VOTED ; To accept this recommendation for road con- 
struction by the Department of Public Works. 

Mr. Vhitmore mentioned the examination of preliminary 

plans of the front elevation of the Public Health Building as 

being satisfactory and it was 

VOTED : To approve the elevations of the Public 
Health Building as prepared by James H. 
Ritchie Associates. 

Mr. Vhitmore reported that at the opening of bids on the 

Women' s Physical Education Building on December 15, 1955, that only 

two bids were received, the lowest of these was for $1,900,000 

which was approximately £4-00,000 more than was available for the 

construction phase of this project. He reported that Mr. Nichols, 

Director of Division of Building Construction, - and Treasurer 

Johnson had requested the Architect, Perry, Shaw, Hepburn, Kehoe 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

and Dean, to examine the bids and to make recommendations for 

possible reduction of the size of the building to bring it within 

the appropriation available for this project of $1,671,000. It was 

VOTED ; To authorize the reduction in size of this 
Women' s Physical Education Building to come 
within the available appropriation. 

Mr. Vhitmore reported briefly on the progress being made 
in the refinement of the Preliminary Master Plan as prepared by 
Shurcliff and Shurcliff and its restudy by the Campus Planning 
Council and administrative officers of the University. He stated 
that a future meeting of the Buildings and Grounds Committee would 
be devoted to a detailed consideration of this plan with a report 
to the Trustees at a later date. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that the Chairman of the 

Finance Committee, Mr. Haigis, had authorized the sale of $10.33 

worth of Commonwealth and Edison Company rights on November 22, 

1955? since there was not an opportunity to obtain board action 

at that time prior to the expiration of the rights. It was 

VOTED ; To confirm the sale of 52 Commonwealth 
and Edison Company Pights. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that efforts to collect a stu- 
dent loan from Charles W. Ladd, Stockbridge Class of 1938 f in an 
amount of &33-00 plus accrued interest to July 1, 1955 j of $23.33 
had been unsuccessful. This matter had been referred to the 
Attorney General of the Commonwealth for collection and in a letter 
of September 23, 1955> he had stated that it was impossible to 
collect this account and authorized it being written off as "bad 
debt". It was 



1875 



Stock 



Student 
Loan 



1876 



TRUSTEE 



Unrestricted 

Trust 

Funds 



Trust 
Funds 



Gillespie, 
John - 
Director of 
Bureau of 
Government 
Fesearch 






UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to write the 
loan of Charles W. Ladd in the amount of 
$33 .00 plus accumulated interest to date 
off the records of the University as 
"uncollectible" . 

Treasurer Johnson reported a grant of $250.00 in un- 
restricted funds to the Trustees of the University as the result 
of a matching grant to a student in Electrical Engineering by the 
name of Robert E. Jacobson. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : That the Trustees authorize the President 
to expend $250.00 of the General Electric 
Grant for unrestricted purposes. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that grants for research made 

to the Trustees of the University sometimes carried overhead funds 

as part of the grant. These overhead amounts in these grants have 

been established in a special trust fund account and that they were 

available for further use. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the President to use the funds 
accumulated in this Research Trust Fund 
account for the furtherance of additional 
research and related activities at the 
University. 

President Mather stated that in the last appropriation 
for the University a Bureau of Government Research was established. 
This bureau was to be headed by a director, grade 62, at a start- 
ing salary of $7,080.00. In accordance with the usual procedure, 
a committee of the faculty was appointed with Dean Fred V. Cahill, Jr. 
as its chairman, to make a wide search for the best qualified candidate 
for this position. After screening more than twenty-five applicants 
for the position, the committee recommended the appointment of 
Jr. John Gillespie, 2302 Vest 4-9 th Street, Austin, Texas, as the 

best qualified applicant for this position. (Dr. Gillespie's 



1877 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



USTEE 



personnel data is enclosed with these minutes.) After discussion 
of the candidate's qualifications and on recommendation of the 
President, it was unanimously 



VOTED : To appoint Dr. John Gillespie as Director 
of the Bureau of Government Research, 
effective January 15, 1956, at a starting 
salary of $7,030. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4.: 25 P» m « 




. u^> 




Secretary 



Chairman 



1878 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Memorandum 

From: Dean Fred V. Cahill, Jr. Date: December 9> 1955 
To: President Mather (through Provost McCune) 
Subject: Director of Bureau of Government Research 



1. The appointment of Dr. John Gillespie, 2302 West 
4.9th, Austin, Texas, to the position of Director 

of the Bureau of Government Research is recommended. 

2. Dr. Gillespie is 37 years of age. He vas born in 
"Winthrop, Massachusetts, and vas graduated from the 
¥inthrop High School. His college and post-graduate 
training were as follows: 

B.A. East Central (Okla.) State College 
M.A. University of Oklahoma 
Ph.D. University of Texas 

He is at present Training Officer at the Institute 
of Public Affairs, the University of Texas. 

3. Dr. Gillespie's choice came after inquiries to the 
principal educational institutions and research 
organizations in the country. He appears to be the 
best qualified both academically and by experience 
to initiate the work of the Institute here. He is 
recommended highly by his associates in Texas. 

4-. If appointed he will assume his duties on 15 
January. 

5. It should be understood that the position of 
Director has not vet been formallv established 
by the Division of Personnel. It is recommended 
that you make arrangements to carry this appoint- 
ment either as Director or as Professor, U of M, 
"A" . 

Respectfully, 

/s/ Fred V. Cahill, Jr. 
Dean 
Approved College of Arts and Science 

Shannon McCune 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

February 14, 1956, 1:00 p.m., Hotel Statler, Boston, Mass. 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Bartlett, Boyden, Brown, 
Miss Buxton, Cashin, Crowley, 
Desmond, Hawes, McDermott, 
Mrs. McNamara, Taber, Whitmore, 
Harry Stimpson, representing 
Governor Herter, President Mather, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Burke 

It was 

VOTED : To dispense with reading of the call and 

reading of the minutes of the last meeting. 

Chairman Bartlett appointed the following Nominating 
Committee to recommend officers and committee members for the 
coming year: Trustee Whitmore, Chairman, Trustees Crowley and 
Taber. 

Trustee Boyden reported for the special Committee on 
Tuition and Fees which met at the University on January 20, 1956. 
He said that minutes of this meeting have been sent to members of 
the Board, and therefore he would not repeat the entire report of 
the committee. Dr. Boyden then read the following policy state- 
ment. (see attached) 

Chairman Bartlett requested the Secretary to read letter 
from Robert Leavitt, Executive Secretary, Associate Alumni of the 
University of Massachusetts dated February 2, 1956 and addressed 

to Dr. Bartlett, Chairman of the Board of Trustees on the subject 
of students from outside the Commonwealth. The Secretary was re- 
quested to file this communication and to note its presentation to 
the Board. 



1879 



Nominating 
Committee 



Tuition 

Policy 

Statement 



Students 

Outside 

Commonwealth 



1880 



TRUSTEE 



Fees for loss 
or damage of 
University 
property 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Bartlett recalled that at the Board meeting in 

December of 1955, the Trustees voted a $15.00 increase in room 

rent and a $20.00 increase in student fees to cover amortization 

and operation of the Student Union Building. At this same meeting 

the Trustees referred the question of possible tuition increase to 

a special committee. After discussion, it was unanimouslt 

VOTED : To approve the tuition policy statement 
as presented. 

Also on the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on 

Tuition and Fees, it was 

VOTED ; To approve the following policy for re- 
imbursement for loss or damage of Uni- 
versity property. 

1. Damage or loss to all University property 
to be billed at replacement cost. Minimum 
charge for such damage or loss to be $2.00. 
Items of less than $2.00 value not charged 
except as established below. 

2. Key Deposit - effective June 4, 1956 

Discontinue present key deposit. 
Establish charge for key replacement 
of $2.00. 

3. Chemistry Breakage - effective immediately. 

Discontinue present charges for chemistry 
breakage except where loss or damage is 
$2.00 or more for each loss. 

4. Athletic Losses - effective immediately. 

Discontinue present athletic loss charges 
except where loss or damage is $2.00 or 
more for each loss. 

5. Library Fines - effective immediately. 

Minimum charge for lost book $5.00 
Replacement of lost library card .25 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Schedule of library fines - 

Reserve Books - returned late on 
date due 

Reserve Books - after due date 
Reserve Books taken from library 

but not charged 
Regular circulation 



. 25 per hour 

1.00 per day 

1.00 per day 

.02 per day 



Librarian authorized to waive fines when 
in his judgment undue hardship is caused. 

Privilege of borrowing library books for use 
outside the library may be denied by the 
Librarian for unpaid fines or charges. 

Chairman Boyden also reported for the Committee on 

Faculty and Program of Study which met at 12:15 this same day. 

On the recommendation of this committee, it was 

VOTED : that the Trustees award the degrees to the 

candidates as set forth on the attached list 
with the understanding that the degrees will 
be awarded as of February 14, 1956 to those 
students desiring their diplomas at this time 
or as of commencement in June of 1956 to 
those students who may prefer to receive 
their diplomas at that time. 

Upon the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was 

VOTED : That the Trustees award the degrees to the 

candidates as set forth on the attached list 
with the understanding that the degrees will 
be awarded as of February 14, 1956. 

Dr. Boyden reported that the Committee on Faculty and 
Program of Study had approved recommendation from the administra- 
tion of the University that a School of Education be established 
effective September 1, 1956. 

Chairman Bartlett said that all members of the Board 
had received full written statement concerning this recommendation 
and called for questions or discussion. 



1881 



Degrees 



School of 
Education 



1882 



TRUSTEE 



Teaching 
Fellows 



Stipends 



Richard M. 
Colwell 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Commissioner Desmond said that Massachusetts needs more 
teachers and that creation of this school should help toward meet- 
ing this need. There was some discussion as to the timing of the 
proposed practice teaching school and President Mather pointed out 
that while the practice school is a very desirable feature of a 
School of Education, it is not necessary to have the practice school 
before the School of Education is ^established. In fact school 
status will merely emphasize work which is already being done by 
the Department of Education in the College of Arts and Science of 
the University. He said that the school will continue the present 
philosophy of the department which is to require students to obtain 
75% of their education in subject matter outside the Department of 
Education. After further discussion and on recommendation of the 
Committee on Faculty and Program of Study, it was 

VOTED : To authorize establishment of a School of 
Education in the University effective 
September 1, 1956. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and Pro- 
gram of Study, it was 

VOTED ; To authorize payment of $1200 per year for 
half-time teaching fellows in their first 
year of service and $1400 per year for 
half-time teaching fellows in their second 
or succeeding years of service, the new 
stipends to be effective February 1, 1956. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and Pro- 
gram of Study, it was 

VOTED : To promote Richard M. Colwell from Associate 
Professor to Professor in the School of 
Business Administration effective February 1, 
1956 at annual salary of $6780. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Scudy, it was 

VOTED ; To name Fayette H. Branch, Professor of 
Agricultural Economics and Farm Manage- 
ment, Emeritus, effective on his retire- 
ment January 3, 1956. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was 

VOTED ; To name Wellesley C. Harrington, Professor 
of Agricultural Engineering, Emeritus, 
effective on his retirement January 6, 1956. 

Trustee Whitmore reported for the Committee on Buildings 

and Grounds which met February 6, 1956 and on the recommendation of 

this committee, it was 

VOTED : To accept Shurcliff and Shurcliff's pre- 
liminary plans as having been completed 
satisfactorily and to authorize final 
payment for these plans. 

Also on the recommendation of the Committee on Buildings 

and Grounds, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Division of Building 
Construction employ Shurcliff and Shurcliff 
for preparation of a complete master plan 
of the campus it being understood that pay- 
ment for this work will be provided from funds 
of the Division of Building Construction. 

The Trustees then considered recommendation from the 

Buildings and Grounds Committee for the reconstruction and paving 

of certain campus roads. Chairman Whitmore said that the 

committee had considered this list with Mr. Sidney Shurcliff and 

that construction of these roads would not conflict with later 

development of the campus. He pointed out also that only the 

first three projects would be undertaken in the immediate future 

and that the priority list as proposed could be later modified if 



1883 



Fayette H. 

Branch 

Emeritus 



Wellesley C. 

Harrington 

Emeritus 



Master Plan 
Payment 



1884 



TRUSTEE 



Roads 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



the Board so desired. After consideration of the committee 

recommendations, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to advise the 
Public Works Department of the state that 
the Trustees have approved the following 
priority list for construction of campus 
roads by the Department of Public Works. 

1. Approach to campus from new Rt. 116 by-pass to be 
built by Department of Public Works as part of 
Rt. 116 project connecting to old route 116 - 
North Pleasant Street and other campus roads as 
shown on plan in yellow. 

2. 1956 project with present $22,500 available - 
rebuild road from foot of Clark Hill Road at 
intersection with Butterfield Terrace running 
northerly in front of Mills and Brooks Dormi- 
tories past Durfee Conservatory to intersection 
with Scockbridge Road with connections to other 
roads as shown on plan in red. 

3. Rebuild Stockbridge Road full length as shown 
on plan in blue. 

4. Construct new road from north edge of ravine 
near Power Plant to Engineering Buildings as 
shown on plan in green. 

5. Rebuild road on north side of ravine from Ellis 
Drive to proposed outer-circulatory road as 
shown on plan in orange. 

6. Build road connecting Chemistry Addition to 
North Pleasant Street with connections to Engi- 
neering Buildings as shown on the plan in purple. 

7. Construct outer-circulatory road as shown from 
North Pleasant Street to new approach road as 
shown on the plan in brown. 

8. Construct connecting links from Classroom Build- 
ing (Machmer Hall) to Library Addition as shown 
on the plan in black. 

9. Construct new road from Lincoln Avenue to North 
Pleasant Street and rebuild section of Lincoln 
Avenue as shown on the plan in pink. 

10. Construct connecting roads in men's dormitory 
area as shown on the plan in light green. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

11. Rebuild and surface Eastman Lane (if title has 
been acquired) as shown on the plan in light 
blue. 

Treasurer Johnson said that the Division of Building Con- 
struction has offered to provide funds for employment of an archi- 
tect to make preliminary study toward the preparation of plans for 
the ROTC building which has been recommended by the Governor for 
inclusion in the state capital outlay program in the current 
legislative session. He recalled that the Trustees had earlier 
considered the employment of Clinton Goodwin of Haverhill as 
architect for one of the new buildings authorized for construction. 
At that time Mr. Goodwin had too much work in his office to con- 
sider undertaking work for the University. The Treasurer believes 
that Mr. Goodwin is now available and pointed out that 
Mr. Goodwin was the architect for Goodell Library and for the 
Curry S. Hicks Physical Education building which have proved very 
satisfactory. Treasurer Johnson said that the amount to be appro- 
priated by the state for the ROTC building is $400,000 and it is 
possible that the federal government may make a matching appro- 
priation. It is proposed that the architect plan a building which 
can be constructed for $400,000 but which could be expanded to 
$800,000 should federal matching funds become available. After 
consideration, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Division of Building 
Construction employ Mr. Clinton Goodwin of 
Haverhill to prepare a preliminary study 
toward the preparation of plans for the 
proposed ROTC building. 



1885 



ROTC 
Building 



1886 



TRUSTEE 

Ratification 
Action 



Honorary 
Degrees 



Annual 
Report 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



According to annual custom, it was 

VOTED : To ratify committee actions since the last 
annual meeting of the Board it being 
recognized that these committee actions 
have been separately acted upon by the 
Board either during the year or at this 
annual meeting. 

On the recommendation of the faculty committee on 

honorary degrees and the President of the University, it was 

VOTED : To award the honorary degree LL.D. to 
Ralph J. Bunche on February 16, 1956 
on the occasion of Dr. Bunche' s lecture 
at the University. 

On the recommendation of the University committee on 

honorary degrees and of the President, it was 

VOTED : To award the following honorary degrees 
at the 1956 commencement - it being 
understood that the candidates must 
appear in person to receive the award. 

Francis M. Andrews, Doctor of Humanities - D.Hu. 
John S. Fischer, Doctor of Humane Letters - L.H.D. 
Albert Nels Jorgensen, Doctor of Laws - LL.D. 
Lin Dao-Yang, Doctor of Laws - LL.D. 

President Mather presented his annual report for 1955 

and it was 

VOTED : To accept the report as presented. 

Trustee Whitmore reported for the Nominating Committee 

and it was unanimously 

VOTED : To instruct the Secretary to cast one ballot 
for the following slate of officers and 
committee members for the ensuing year: 

President, Christian A. Herter 
Chairman, Joseph W. Bartlett 
Secretary, James W. Burke 
Treasurer, Kenneth W. Johnson 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Committee on Faculty and Program of Study 

Frank L. Boyden, Chairman John J. Desmond 

Grace A. Buxton Mrs. Elizabeth L. McNamara 

Dennis M. Crowley Lewis Perry 

Committee on Agriculture and Horticulture 

Harry D. Brown, Chairman L. Roy Hawes 

Alden C. Brett Ernest Hoftyzer 

Dennis M. Crowley 



Committee on Buildings and Grounds 
Philip F. Whitmore, Chairman 
Alden C. Brett 
John W. Haigis 

Committee on Finance 



John W. Haigis, Chairman 
Alden C. Brett 
William M. Cash in 



F. Roland McDermott 
Ralph F. Taber 



F. Roland McDermott 
Philip F, Whitmore 



Committee on Recognized Student Activities 

Dennis M. Crowley, Chairman Grace A. Buxton 
Frank L. Boyden Ernest Hoftyzer 

Harry D. Brown Ralph F. Taber 



Committee on Legislation 

William M. Cashin, Chairman 
Harry D. Brown 
John W. Haigis 

Executive Committee 

Joseph W. Bartlett, Chairman 
Frank L. Boyden 
Alden C. Brett 



Mrs. Elizabeth L. McNamara 
Ralph F. Taber 



William M. Cashin 
Philip F. Whitmore 



Treasurer Johnson reported that the University has 

s 

received a gift of $2500 from Mr. and Mrs. David But trick to be 
added to the principal of the David H. Buttrick Scholarship Fund. 
This brings the principal in this fund to $10,000. It was 



unanimously 



VOTED: 



To accept the gift of Mr. and Mrs. David 
Buttrick with appreciation and to direct 
the Treasurer to add this amount to the 
David H. Buttrick Scholarship Fund. 



1887 



Committees 



Buttrick 

Scholarship 

Fund 



1888 



TRUSTEE 



Tuition 
Fees 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Mather said that following the action of the 
special trustee Committee on Tuition and Fees, the Treasurer had 
been requested to prepare a tuition schedule spelled out for various 
lengths of time to cover different courses offered by the Univer- 
sity on a pro-rata basis in accordance with the main recommendation 
of the trustee committee. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To approve the following schedule of tuition 
charges effective June 4, 1956. 

Undergraduate - Four Year 

Residents of the Commonwealth - $100 - 2 semesters 
Non-Res idents of the Commonwealth - $400 - 2 semesters 

Special Students - Undergraduates 

Residents of the Commonwealth - $5.00 per credit hour with 

maximum of $50 per semester. 
Non-Residents of the Commonwealth - $20.00 per credit hour 

with maximum of $200 per 
semester. 

School of Nursing - 12 months program 

Residents of the Commonwealth - first & fifth years $100 
Residents of the Commonwealth - second, third & fourth 130 
Non-Res idents of the Commonwealth - first & fifth 

years 400 

Non-Residents of the Commonwealth - second, third & 

fourth 520 

Stockbridge School of Agriculture - Non Degree Courses 
Residents of the Commonwealth - $100 - 2 semesters 
Non- Res idents of the Commonwealth - 400 - 2 semesters 

1/2 semester - Residents - $25.00 
1/2 semester - Non- Res idents - $100 

Special Short Courses - Non Degree Courses - Stockbridge School 



Residents and Non-Residents - $5.00 per week 

Graduate School 

Residents of the Commonwealth - $5.00 per credit hour with 

maximum of $50 per semester. 
Non-Residents of the Commonwealth - $10.00 per credit hour 

with maximum of $110 per 
semester 



Summer School 

Residents of the Commonwealth 
Non- Res idents of the Commonwealth 



$5.00 per credit hour 
10.00 per credit hour 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Special Non-Degree Courses - Summer Sessions 
Residents & Non- Re si dents - $5.00 per week 

Chairman Bartlett suggested that the Finance Committee 
of the Board should meet each year following the report of the 
state auditors to consider the recommendations made by the Auditor. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4:30 p.m. 




4^^9^€CJ^ 



m Secretary 



Chairman 



1889 



1890 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



TUITION POLICY STATEMENT 



In 1887 Senator Justin Morrill of Vermont, author of the 
Land Grant Act which established the present University of 
Massachusetts, speaking on the campus at Amherst said: 

"The Land-Grant Colleges were founded on the idea that a 
higher and broader education should be placed in every state 
within the reach of those whose destiny assigns them to, or 
who may have the courage to choose industrial vocations where 
the wealth of nations is produced; where advanced civilication 
unfolds its comforts, and where a much larger number of the 
people need wider educational advantages, and impatiently 
await their possession. The design was to open the door to a 
liberal education for this large class at a cheaper cost from 
being close at hand, and to tempt them by offering not only 
sound literary instruction, but something more applicable to 
the productive employments of life." 

Whereas the Board of Trustees of the University of 
Massachusetts : 



Recognizes a public responsibility to an enlightened 
Commonwealth population, a population which appreciates the 
moral, spiritual and economic advantages that state-supported 
public education brings to the progress, productivity, and 
well-being of the future citizenry 

Recognizes that this public trusteeship embraces the 
cherished obligation of the respective status of the United 
States to educate qualified youth to accept their rightful 
role in an expanding and prospering nation, full prepared for 
better living in a democratic society 

Recognizes that the historic tradition of American culture 
and civilization is the progressive advancement of public 
education; that in this tradition the Commonwealth that fosters 
the ideas of Horace Mann should lead in the rapidly evolving 
concept that public elementary and secondary education will 
eventually extend to college and university education; that 
the pressing demands of a complex society require such ex- 
tended education, in quantity as well as quality, to meet the 
challenge of national and world leadership 

Recognizes that the overwhelming majority of students en- 
rolled at the University come from relatively low income 
families where the total expense of college enrollment including 
tuition is a heavy burden. That these same students are 
already paying for food, housing, and recreation under self- 
amortizing programs in force 



1891 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Recognizes that many other states in the nation are making 
a higher per capita investment from the public treasury in higher 
education and believing that a state which now enjoys a high per 
capita income can maintain its competitive position among the 
states only through the support of programs that will guarantee 
a high level of educational opportunity to its citizens who, 
when better educated, return greater tax resources to the 
Commonwealth] that these considerations far outweigh any short- 
term fiscal exigencies and should be viewed as Americans have 
always faced the future with faith and courage 



Recognizes with confidence that the citizens of Massachu- 
setts will support a reasonable program for providing qualified 
Massachusetts youth with opportunities for higher education, in 
order to graduate more young people technically skilled in the 
arts and sciences, engineering, commerce, and agriculture, and 
broadly educated for citizenship responsibilities as the best 
public investment that can be made to guarantee our future 
prosperity, national safety, and individual happiness. 

Therefore the Board of Trustees of the University of 
Massachusetts reaffirms its position established through long 
practice that tuition charges should be maintained at the 
present nominal level for residents of the Commonwealth. 



1892 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
STUDENTS COMPLETING REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION AS OF FEBRUARY 1956 
Candidates for Degree of Bachelor of Arts 



Joan Marie Bayon 
Lois Ann Blakeney 
Richard Allan Bolton 
Erma Brown Br overman 
Dorothy Makepeace Cochran 
Neil Sawyer Fleming 
Robert E. Gregoire 



Evan Carle ton Howe 
William Arthur Kilbourn 
Peter Simon Kules 
Audrey Austin Macdonald 
George Richard McNeil 
Robert Carr Mitchell, Jr. 
Ruric Ritchie Robertson, Jr. 



Robert Wall Tuthill 



Candidates for Degree of Bachelor of Science 



Wendell Burnham Cook, Jr. 
John Maurice Foley 
Richard Alan Gleckman 
Ralph Henry Hall 
Warren Dorman Henderson, Jr. 
Lois Skinner List 



Gordon Raymond Long 
Paul Miller Maclnnis 
Richard L, MacNeill 
Margaret Alice Parsons 
Edward Otis Stockbridge 
Robert Frank Temple 



Candidates for Degree of Bachelor of Business Administration 



Carlos Alves 
James Anthony Barnes 
Christopher Chopelas 
James Goodhue Dixon 



Erwin John Kiss ling, Jr. 
Jacqueline J. Nault 
Robert John Pollock 
Roger Edwin Sawyer 



Candidates for Degree of Bachelor of Science in Electrical 
Engineering 

Stratos George Kukakis Robin Bancroft Lewis 

James Hill Robinson, Jr. 

Candidates for Degree of Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering 

Edward Levine Jefferson Lord Tubman 

Candidate for Degree of Bachelor of Vocational Agriculture 

Paul L. Pothier 

Candidate for Degree of Bachelor of Science in C hemical _E njg_i ne e ri ng_ 

Francis Stanley Pychewicz 

Candidates for Degree Master of Science 



Paul Raymond Bourdeau 
Francis Gerald Ciarfella 
Stanley Michael Dec 
John Joseph Dowd 
Remo Frances chini 



Charles Zapsalis 



Raymond Roy Gagnon 
Herbert Dunkerly Hill, Jr. 
Roger Weston Kelley, Jr. 
Thomas Carl in Lott 
Frank Albert Morrone, Jr. 



I 



TRUSTEE 



1893 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Candidate for Degree Master of Arts 

Joseph Raymond Hilyard, Jr. 

Candidates for Degree of Master of Business Administration 



Robert Edward Milkey 



Robert William O'Brien 



I 



I 



Anthony Nicholas Sacco 
Candidates for Degree Doctor of Philosophy 
Pericles Markakis Pillay Soma Sekhar 



1894 



TRUSTEE 



New 
Courses 



Robert P. 
Holdsworth 



Arnold D. 
Rhodes 



H. T. U. 
Smith 



Personnel 
Changes 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

May 15, 1956, 12:30 p.m., Butterfield House, U of M, Amherst 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Bartlett, Boyden, Brett, Brown, 
Miss Buxton, Crowley, Desmond, Haigis, 
Taber, President Mather, Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary Burke 

Dr. Boyden reported for the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study. On the recommendation of the Committee on 

Faculty and Program of Study, it was 

VOTED : To approve the attached new undergraduate courses 
of study. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 
Program of Study, it was also 

VOTED : To approve the attached new graduate courses. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was 

VOTED : To approve Professor Robert P. Holdsworth's 
request to be relieved of his duties as Head 
of the Department of Forestry and to affirm 
his status as full Professor of Forestry 
effective September 1, 1956. 

Also upon the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty 

and Program of Study, it was 

VOTED : To promote Professor Arnold D. Rhodes from 
Professor of Forestry to Head of Department 
of Forestry effective September 1, 1956. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was 

VOTED : To appoint Dr. H. T. U. Smith as Head of the 

Department of Geology effective September 1, 1956. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was 

VOTED : To approve the attached report of personnel 

changes for the period January 1, 1955 through 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 
Program of Study, it was 

VOTED: To approve the following sabbatical leaves 

subject to appropriation of funds and to the 
usual conditions governing sabbatical leaves. 
Those individuals going for one-half year or 
for one semester are to be granted leave with 
full pay and those going for one year are to 
be granted leave at half pay. 

Frederick B. Chandle r to take leave July 1, 1956 to 
December 31, 1956. He will study the relationship of 
drainage, irrigation, root growth and the yield of 
cranberries. This study will be made in New Jersey, 
Wisconsin, California, Oregon and Washington and a 
manuscript will be prepared on the basis of results 
obtained. 

Katherine Allen Clarke for the second semester 1956-1957 
to gather material in France for a biography of Jean 
Giono, Modern French Novelist. Miss Clarke has trans- 
lated some of Giono 's novels and will complete the 
translation of those which have not already appeared 
in America. 

Byron Colby leave for one year from September 14, 1956, 
to study recent developments in Animal Science in order 
to improve the Extension Program and research in this 
area. Examples of new developments include new feeds, 
the use of hormones and antibiotics in livestock rations. 
Professor Colby will establish residence at an eastern 
University. 

Albert E. Goss for the second semester 1956-1957 to 
complete a survey of psychological data and theory 
"concerning the role of verbal processes in human 
learning. This will be carried on in several centers 
of research including Yale University, University of 
Iowa, University of Minnesota and the Congressional 
Library. 

J. Henry Korson for second semester 1956-1957 to con- 
duct research in the area of Industrial Sociology. 
Professor Korson' s project is entitled "National Com- 
parisons of Occupational Mobility and Prestige." The 
work would be conducted in England and several Northern 
European countries. 

Bruce R. Morris for the second semester 1956-1957 to 
complete research for a book on which he has been work- 
ing for some years on the subject of Economic and 

Social Planning. The research would be done in the 
Scandinavian countries and primarily in Denmark. 



1895 



Sabbatical 
Leaves 



1896 



TRUSTEE 



Animal 
Healch 
Building 



Housing for 
Faculty and 
Married 
Students 



Fraternities 

and 

Sororities 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Paul A. Swenson for the academic year 1956-1957 for 
research work in the field of Cellular Physiology. 
Professor Swenson has been carrying out a research 
program supported by the Atomic Energy Commission 
on the effects of ultra-violet light on the 
metabolism of radio active phosphorous by yeast 
cells. He will continue this study at the Brookhaven 
National Laboratory at Upton, Long Island. 

Gilbert L. Woodside for the second semester 1956-1957 
to continue his research on cancer in mice. He has 
been invited to spend the semester at the National 
Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Maryland where he will 
have an opportunity to learn the technique of using 
the electron microscope equipment which it is planned 
to include in the new Life Sciences Building at the 
University. 

Trustee Brett reported for the Committee on Buildings and 

Grounds. On the recommendation of the Committee on Buildings and 

Grounds , it was 

VOTED: To approve plans for the building for the in- 
vestigation of health problems of large 
animals as prepared by Louis W. Ross, architect. 

It was also 

VOTED : To authorize the construction of this building 
on a site adjoining the present poultry 
isolation building behind Paige Laboratory. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Buildings and 

Grounds , it was 

VOTED : To request the University of Massachusetts 

Building Association to study the possibility 
of constructing 100 low cost apartment units 
for the University on a self-liquidating basis. 

The Trustees considered at some length the recommendation 

that land be set aside for sale to fraternities and sororities for 

the construction of chapter houses. President Mather said that he 

has reviewed this problem since the Buildings and Grounds Committee 

met on May 8. He feels that the University should impose certain 

conditions on the fraternities but not conditions which would 
interfere with their ability to obtain loans for the construction of 



1897 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

chapter houses. He said that the University could insist that the 
fraternity financial situation be made known to the University 
through each house reporting its financial condition through the 
Recognized Student Organization office. This office now requires 
financial statements from all recognized student organizations. 
The University could also insist that each house have a house 
mother and thirdly could insist that the cubage per student in 
the fraternity houses be no less than the cubage per student in 
the dormitories. 

Chairman Bartlett suggested that any conveyance to a 
fraternity be subject to the following restrictions: 

1. That Grantee will not sell or otherwise dispose 
of the premises herein conveyed or any part thereof un- 
less the Grantee shall have first received an acceptable 
bona fide offer for the purchase or other disposition of 
the premises, and shall have notified the Grantor in 
writing of the names of the party or parties making the 
same and the price, terms and conditions thereof; and 
Grantee agrees that the Grantor shall thereupon have the 
prior right to purchase the premises at the same price 
and upon the same terms and conditions as are contained 

in such offer. This right may be exercised any time with- 
in sixty days of receipt of notice of said offer by the 
Grantor. * If the Grantor fails to exercise said right and 
the Grantee for any reason fails to sell or otherwise 
dispose of the premises in accordance with said offer, 
this right shall not terminate but shall apply to any 
future offer received by the Grantee. 

2. Any mortgage which may be placed upon the 
premises shall contain a stipulation that the Mortgagee 
agrees for himself, his heirs, executors, administrators, 
successors or assigns to assign said mortgage to the 
trustees of the University of Massachusetts upon request 
by them and upon the payment to the Mortgagee of the 
amount outstanding on said mortgage including principal, 
interest, penalties, and any other addition to the 
principal of said mortgage which are lawfully due to 

the Mortgagee. 



1898 



TRUSTEE 



Poultry 
Houses 



French Hall 
Renovation 



Five-year 
Capital 
Outlay 
Budget 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To set aside a portion or portions of the 

campus for sale to fraternities and sororities 
for the construction of chapter houses subject 
to approval by the Board of suitable sites to 
be recommended by Shurcliff and Shurcliff and 
with the understanding that proper restrictions 
shall be imposed in the conveyance of land. 

On the recommendation of the Buildings and Grounds 

Committee, it was 

VOTED : That subject to the previous vote on sale of 
land, the Board of Trustees consider a 
"recapture" clause no longer necessary in 
deeding land to fraternities and sororities. 

On the recommendation of the Buildings and Grounds 

Committee, it was 

VOTED : To authorize two wooden poultry houses to 

be located temporarily on land to the south 
of the Brooks Farm barn - it being under- 
stood that the buildings must be removed 
later in favor of other University construction 
scheduled for this area. 

On the recommendation of the Buildings and Grounds 

Committee, it was 

VOTED : To accept as completed April 11, 1956 the 
French Hall renovation U-402 contract #2 
by the Fontaine Brothers of Chicopee. 

On the recommendation of the Buildings and Grounds 

Committee, it was 

VOTED : To approve the capital outlay program with 

the understanding that the administration is 
specifically authorized to submit the 1958 
program as an approved part of the Trustee 
budget and that the buildings listed in 
succeeding years will be subject to yearly 
review by the Trustees. 

On the recommendation of the Buildings and Grounds 

Committee, it was 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED ; To authorize the administration to cut the 
the rents to half price on two apartments 
to be used for power plant engineers in the 
University faculty apartment building. 

Treasurer Johnson reported receipt of letter from Mr. 

H. Herbert Applin, Chairman of the Middlesex County Commissioners 

as follows: 

"The County Commissioners have mailed to you under separate 
cover a print showing land to be conveyed to the County 
of Middlesex in connection with the relocation of 
Beaver Street, Waltham. 

"We are in receipt of a copy of letter to you from the 
Waltham City Engineer, Mr. Herbert F. Howe, which 
gives assurance that the work you felt necessary 
before you would relinquish the land in question 
would be performed by the City. 

"We would greatly appreciate it if you would now take 
the necessary action to obtain the consent of your 
Trustees to make the transfer of such land, and 
secure the required approval of the Governor and 
Council in accordance with Section 44A, Chapter 30, 
General Laws, as stated in your letter of January 11, 
1956 to this Board." 

The Trustees studied the print mentioned in the above 

letter and after discussion 

VOTED : To transfer the described piece of land to 
Middlesex County subject to the approval of 
the Governor and Council in accordance with 
Section 44A, Chapter 30 of the General Laws. 

On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on 

Finance, it was 

VOTED : To transfer $5,000 from the Trust Fund 

Interest Account to the University Scholar- 
ship Fund for unrestricted scholarships to 
students to be awarded by the University 
Scholarship Committee. 

On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on 

Finance, it was 



1899 



Power Plant 
Engineers 



Waltham 

Field 

Station 



land 



Scholarship 
Fund 






1900 



TRUSTEE 



Student 

Union 

Funds 



Student 

Union 

Budget 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To authorize that the Student Union be 

organized with four funds to be established 
on the books of the University Treasurer as 
trust funds as follows: 

1. Student Union General Fund 

2. Student Union Reserve Fund 

3. Student Union Food Service Fund 

4. University Store (same account as now authorized) 

That the Director of the Student Union shall have 
managerial responsibility for all found funds but 
that no funds shall be transferred to or from the 
Student Union Reserve Fund, the Student Union 
Food Service Fund, or the University Store Fund 
except as authorized by the Board of Trustees. 

That the Director of the Student Union shall 
have the authority to disburse all funds in the 
Student Union General Fund with the approved 
budget. Transfers between budget categories 
may be made in each fiscal year with the 
approval of the President. 

That all income to the Student Unionnot budgeted 
that is not specifically designated as income 
to the Student Union Food Service or University 
Store shall be added to the Student Union 
General Fund. 

That transfers of surplus funds will be made 
annually from the Student Union Food Service 
Fund and University Store Fund to the Student 
Union General Fund on approval of the Board 
of Trustees. 

On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on 

Finance, it was 

VOTED : To approve the following Student Union budget 
for the fiscal year July 1, 1956 through 
June 30, 1957. 



INCOME 

Student Fees : 

First Semester 4,400 @ $10 
Second Semester 4,100 @ $10 
Summer Session 600 @ $4 

Transfers : 

University Store - July 1, 1956 



$44,000 

41,000 

2,400 



$87 , 400 
40,000 



TRUSTEE 



1901 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Game Rooms 



Bowl ing 




$20,000 




Billiard 




5,000 




Ping Pong 




1,000 


$26,000 


Rental of Space: 








Barber Shop 




1,500 




Other - Special 


Events 


1,000 


2,500 



Total Income 



$155,900 



EXPENSES 



Personal Services 



Director 

Assistant Director 
Assistant Director 
Senior Clerk & Typist 
Junior Clerk & Typist 
Custodian (6) 
Hostess 
Ho s tee 



Gr. 62 $7,080 

Gr. 52 (10 mos.) 4,350 

Gr. 52 (to be left vacant) 

Gr. 14 (10 mos. ) 2,300 

Gr. 6 (10 mos.) (vacant) 

Gr. 18 (10 mos. )15,000 

Gr. 18 (10 mos. ) 2,500 



Gr. 18 



Rent 



Students & part-time employees 



To General Fund of Commonwealth to 
reimburse for state appropriation 



(vacant) 

3,000 



$34,230 



80,000 



Supplies & Expenses : 

Office & Administrative 
Janitor and miscellaneous 

Transfers : 



$2,000 
3,000 



To Student Union Food Service for Working 
Capital 



Program : 



For Student Union Activities and Programs 

Maintenance & Replacements 

Furnishings & Equipment $2,740 
Bowling, including lease 

of pinsetters 4,700 

Game Rooms 2 ,400 



Reserve for Contingencies - Current Year 



5,000 



20,000 



5,000 



9,840 

1,830 
Total Expenses $155,900 



1902 






Oi 

it was 


TRUSTEE 


VOTED: 


Disposal 




of Old 




Records 






1 




2 




3 




4 



Harrison 
Fund 



it was 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on Finance, 



To adopt the following policy relative to 
disposition of old records subject to the 
approval of the Commission Administration 
and Finance. 

Vouchers supporting disbursements, including 
cancelled checks, should be retained for six 
full fiscal years (Statute of Limitations of 
Actions). 

Documents supporting the receipt of funds 
and general correspondence, should be 
retained for three full fiscal years. 

All books of original entry (including pay- 
roll journals and payroll earnings ledger 
cards), deeds, bequests, annual financial 
statements and other documents having a 
permanent value should be retained 
indefinitely. 

Leases, contracts, insurance policies, and 
other financial agreements not under seal 
should be retained for six fiscal years 
subsequent to the termination date of the 
agreement. Contracts under seal and 
promissory notes should be retained for 
twenty years. 

Miscellaneous records, not included in the 
preceding categories should be retained for 
three full fiscal years. 

All records subject to disposition as out- 
lined above should be destroyed by burning. 



On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on Finance 



VOTED : To accept gift from the will of Lillian S. 
Harrison of Amherst for the following 
purpose: 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

"In memory of my husband, Walter H. Harrison, 
I bequeath and devise one- third (1/3) of my 
estate to the Board of Trustees of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts, for the purpose of 
holding and administering a fund to be known 
as the 'Walther H. Harrison Loan Fund' , said 
Trustees to make loans from the income 
thereof, without interest, to industrious and 
deserving students of the University. In the 
investment and administration of this fund 
wide discretion, with broad and comprehensive 
powers, is hereby expressly conferred upon 
said Board of Trustees." 

and to authorize the Treasurer of the Uni- 
versity to establish an endowment fund in 
the amount of $11,836.14 for carrying out 
the purpose of the donor and to request the 
Secretary of the Board to convey the 
appreciation of the Board of Trustees for 
the Harrison gift. 

President Mather reported that it would be extremely 

inconvenient for Dr. D. Y. Lin, President of Chung Chi College, 

to attend the June commencement to receive the honorary degree 

previously voted by the Board. This trip would take Dr. Lin 

away from his campus at the time when his college is preparing to 

move to a new location. However, Dr. Lin plans to be in this 

country during the winter of 1956-57 and the University would like 

to invite him to the campus to address the students and to receive 

the honorary degree. On the recommendation of the President, it 

was 

VOTED : To postpone award of the honorary degree 

LL. D. to Dr. D. - Y. Lin, President of Chung 
Chi College from June of 1956 to the occasion 
of his visit to the University during the 
winter of 1956-57. 

On the recommendation of the Graduate School Council and 

of the President, it was 



1 



3 



Dr. D. Y. 
Lin 



1904 



LoLta Crabtree 
Fellowships 



TRUSTEE 



Commonwealth 
Scholarships 



Medals 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To award Lotta Crbtree fellowships in the 
amount of $2,000 to Mr. Sidney G. Spec tor, 
Ph.D. candidate in Bacteriology, and Mr. 
Harvey R. Levine, Ph.D. candidate in 
Entomology for the period September 1, 1956 
through June 30, 1957. 

On the recommendation of the University Scholarship 

Committee and of the President, it was 

VOTED : To award Commonwealth scholarships to the 
attached list of members of the Class of 
1960 and to approve the attached list of 
alternates to whom Commonwealth scholar- 
ships are to be awarded in the event that 
any of the 25 recipients is unable to use 
his or her award. 

President Mather said that in 1947 the Trustees had voted 

to authorize the awarding of medals to Alumni wo have performed 

distinguished service. At that time the University found the cost 

of preparing the initial die too expensive and the project x-;as 

never undertaken. However, during the present year the University 

Committee on Honorary Degrees returned to the idea of establishing 

medal awards for distinguished Alumni. It is probable that the 

Associate Alumni will be willing to bear the cost of preparing 

the initial die and the University itself will pay for the medals 

and presentation cases to be awarded each year. After discussion 

and on the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED : To axrard distinguished service medals to 
the following Alumni at the June 1956 
Commencement provided that arrangements 
can be made for financing the medals: 

Sumner R. Parker - Class of 1904 
Edgar A. Perry - Class of 1916 
Charles A. Peters - Class of 1897 



The meeting was a 




U^^a^JC^XC 



Secretary 



Chairman 



i 



MEW COUK££S 

The i oalovimc new ecursee bar* been approve*' e srsity 

Gourse of y Committee and ars recoiHsended for approval of the Board 

of Trustees. 

10HOKY 52 (II) FCftASE CROPS. 

analysis of tee bas rtaclples involved in the estahlisasser: 

f€ d and sasnereaent of forage grasses and legumes, 

wlaas hours. Credit 3 

JTERIGLOST IftCTWKTA?, 3I0LCGY. 

res and exercises demonstrating, the growth asd 

activities of microorganisms as . environment 

and ype end the eif i microorganisms on the envirormm. 

pics considered include the kinetics of papulation growth, 
-iyastic constitution, growth requirements, metabollic pathways 
ffects of r©aio-.ion, 
?rer: ! b : Bacter or equivaler. 

and permission of the instructor. 
>otntc lecture hours . ;it 3 

C1 B 25 (I) aawr^l , T3CHS0LCGY. 

LCtioo nature asd scope of the chemical industry 

e eta I selected chemical process-as such as ccaooc 
Imn carbonate, sodium hydr o xi de, ric acid, asraonie, 

Uric acid, smtbenel. -.ance of economic factors and of 

si factors like e* .a and reaction rates is sbovr.. 

2 Class hours Credit 2 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 2 m 

mL HB3 - 52 (I" a XESIXB. 

Sampling, test: present* '. reports on the engineering 

if soils. Peraaa v ility, consolidation, and shesr 
- st » t fcrisxinl compression is the principal 

4e as 

Clams 2-3 hour lab. periods. Credit 3 

IfflC ^L Z8G: 33 37 EASi; : SE3LIHG I '.ALS. 

Prepare it engineering materials; failure by inelastic actio- 

creep igue, and corrosion. Ens " 2 nature of metals! 

uses of structural metal s, wood, stone, clay 
cementing materials, plastics and rubber. Laboratory 
V3r if hardness, impact and fatigue testing, 

graphic prepare:!.: 

2 Class hoars; 1 3-'. Moratory period radit 5 
Prsrs ^ ^ry 2 or 4] Fnysies 21 taken pr; 

vices ly or concurrently. 

IffiCHaJflCAL 2H31 (II) BASIC A£R»raaXXCS. 

cour. signed to introduce the student with no previous hack- 

gr :he subject, to the basic concents of « i aerodynamics. 

Topics include properties of sir, ideal fluid flow* lift and move- 
men, of a two- dimensional airfoil, three dimensional flow around 
an airfoil, induced and viscous effects, airfoils and their 

-^parties, propellers, aircraft performance &nd stability. 

3 Class hours Credit 3 



-2- 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 85 (I) DYNAMICS OF MACHINERY. 

Elements of vibration theory, vibration isolation, vibration 
analysis of equivalent masses and shaft systems. Vibration 
absorbent, many- degree -of -freedom systeias using iteration. 
Dynamic balancing. Vibration instrumentation. 
3 Class hours Credit 4 

1 3-hour laboratory 

Prerequisites: Civil Engineering 52; Mechanical 

Engineering 68. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 87 (I) ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS III. 

An advanced course where such topics as steam turbines, steam 
power plants, refrigeration, high velocity flow, and shock 
phenomena are investigated. 

3 Class hours Credit 3 

Prerequisites: Mechanical Engineering 64. 

GREEK 1,2, ELEMENTARY GREEK. 

Intensive study of the essentials of the language. Reading of 
sisr^le fielections from classical Greek prose and poetry. The 
course is designed to build a foundation in Greek grammar and 
vocabulary and develop facility for subsequent reeding of master- 
works of classical literature. 
3 Class hours. Credit 3 

GREEK 5, 6, INTERMEDIATE GREEK. 

Review of elements of language. Selected readings in the Homeric 
epics and the dialogues of Plato. Study of the Iliad will be the 
focal point of the course. 

3 Class hours. Credit 3 

Prerequisite: Greek 1 and 2, or two years of High 

School Greek. 

GOVEaNMTE 52 AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY. 

An analysis of the principles of American foreign policy. Con- 
stitutional, political and administrative considerations which 
influence the formulation and execution of American foreign 
policy will be discussed. Special emphasis will be placed on 
current issues. 
3 Class hours. Credit 3 

GOVERNMENT 56 THE LEGISLATIVE. PROCESS. 

A study of the role of the legislature in national and state 
government. Among other topics, the functions of legislatures, 
legislative procedures and the role played by political parties 
and pressure groups in the legislative process will be surveyed. 
Emphasis will be placed on research. 
3 Class hours. Credit 3 

HISTORY 63 (I) 64 (II) HISTORY OF AMERICAN THOUGHT AND CULTURE. 

A study of the basic strands of American thought and their re- 
flection in the development of social life and institutions, 
literature, and the arts. The first course covers the period 
to 1365. Either semester may be elected independently. 
3 Class hours. Credit 3 



I 



""3** 



HISTORY 66 (II) TBS HISTORY OF MODERN GERMANY. 

The evolution of G&m&ay since 1750 In relationship to Western 
Europe. An analysis of those economic, social, and political, 
and intellectual influences which determined the unique direction 
of German cultural development. Culminates in a study of the 
Nazi revolution and contemporary Germany. 
3 Class hours. Credit 3 

HISTORY 79, NEW ENGLAND TO 1860. 

A study of the colonial and early national periods, with emphasis 

upon the political, social and economic aspects of life in this 

region. 

3 Class hours. Credit 3 

WtlE ECONOMICS 3 NUTRITION. 

The fundamental principles of nutrition and their application to 
individual and family food habits. International problems in 
foods and nutrition will also be considered. 
3 Class hours. Credit 3 

RUSSIAN 5 (I) 6 (II) 

A review of the fundamentals of grammar followed by more advanced 
study of grammatical structure and idiom. Continued composition 
and conversation, and readings in Russian fiction. 
3 Class hours; 1 laboratory hour Credit 3 

Prerequisites: Russian 1 and 2. 

SOCIOLOGY 54 ADVANCED ANTHROPOLOGY. 

An examination of the development of anthropological theory of 
social organization as presented in the works of European and 
African anthropologists. A part of the semester is devoted to 
an intensive analysis of a specific culture area. 

Credit 3 
Prerequisite: Sociology 53 (Introductory Anthropology) 

SOCIOLOGY 72 SOCIAL CHANGE. 

• A .'study of social changes arising through invention and culture 
contacts and of the factors which influence acceptance or re- 
jection of these changes. Students will pursue individual projects 
on social movements and other agencies of change. 
3 Class hours. Credit 3 

Prerequisites: Sociology 25 and 26 and permission of instructor. 

SPANISH 7 (I) 8 (II) INTERMEDIATE SPANISH: HISPANIC CULTURE. 

The methods and materials of this course aim to provide the stu- 
dent with insights into some of the most significant aspects of 
. Spanish and Spanish-American civilisation. Intensive grammar 
review, readings, reports, compositions, and oral practice. 
3 Class hours; 1 laboratory hour. Credit 3 

Prerequisites: 2 or 3 years of high school Spanish and 

satisfactory score on placement examination. 
Students who have passed Spanish 1-2 with grade 
of B or better are eligible for this course. 



-4- 



WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT 52 and 152. CONSERVATION OF NATURAL RESOURCES. 

For the summer session only. A description of and conservation 
of basic natural resources including soil, water, forests, wild- 
life, metallic and non-metallic minerals and th? sources of 
energy including atomic energy. Course includes lectures, 
demonstrations and field exercises. 
3 2-hour laboratories 
2 4~hour laboratories Credit 4 



Mathematics 

It is recommended that the Mathematics Department be authorized to continue 
for one mora year (1956-57) to experiment with sections in freshman 
lir.thernatics for Liberal Arts majors with course descriptions as follows: 

Mathematics 1. Introductory Mathematics I. Easic set-thecretic and 
axiomatic concepts, ruraber systems and equations. A study of elementary 
functions, algebraically and by the methods of analytic geonetry. 

Mathematics 2. Introductory Mathematics II. A terminal course intended for 
students whose curriculum calls for just one year of mathematics. A con- 
tinuation of Mathematics 1, including topics from the calculus, statistics 
and mathematics of finance. 

Mathematics 4. Introductory Mathematics IV. A continuation of Hatheinatics ] 
for those students intending to take further courses in Mathematics. 
Analytic geometry and trigonometry. 



I 



■^■^ 



GRADUATE COURSES 



The Graduate School Council requests approval no offer the follow- 
ing courses in the Graduate School; *waw 

250. FOOD CO1.0R3MT&Y. 

Composition and properties of food colorants. Methods of measure - 

teent and specification of color in rev and processed foods.. The nature 

cause and control of- color changes In the handling, processing, and storage 

or food product*. The application of the 3tasell7 IX.I. and other color 

systems to oossaerciai quality control and laboratory Inspection under 

governmental grading standards. 

One lecture; one 2-hour laboratory; second semester 

Prerequisites; Food Technology 191 and 192; Chemistry 165 and 166. Credit 3 

255. PSYCHOXHESAPY I ' 

«*• -i * A r* l y»«« °f t«*al*»a of individual psychotherapy. The student 

SLJ !« ^^rrentiy a practice in psychotherapy in vhich a therapy case, 

guidance a,.nic, student counseling center, state mental hospital 
Prerequisites: Psychology 226, 235, 253, and 254. Cred4t 3 

256. PSYCHOTHERAPY XI 

*1* st«te«t I ^?? e t- <,f ^ Jr0U,? "* •{*«**"*•* techniques of psychotherapy. 
~ne student wiU etact concurrently a practice in which anpervlaad practice 

In one or more group psychotherapeutic methods will be given P"*"** 
prerequisites: Psychology 226, 235, 252, 253, 254, and 255. Credit 3 

200. SPECIAL HtOBLSHS W HBCHAiOCAL EUGXHBERm* 

ln» <w ,/r ff investigational or research problems in Mechanical Engineer- 
S^tSLS^- ^ -^ ^ this ^ to he varied to ^ ' 
Prerequisite as required by the problem. Credit 1-6 

211. THSOEY OF PO^R MACHINES 
*~ &n A l l naaa*c and design aspects underlying power machinery such 

as e »s and a.e^ curbines, internal combustion eaglnea, Notary and reciprocatin* 
coapreseors , Jn jpuleion and rocSsats. reciprocating 

Prerequisite; eel Engineering 201. Cradit 3 

200. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IK INmiSTRIAL BKGI8EERIKG 
« * « Special investigational or research problems in industrial maiiiear- 

Prerequisite as required by the problem. Credit 1-6 

215. SEMINAR IN FRE!0 

«.*.«M a i J concentrated study of the many highly epeeialised techniques 

c£Sa£L£* %33» ? ro i lcleric >' ** *•«*** skill. The acinar offers a 
conpreuenciva training leading to the now requisite oral mastery of WrJZh 

ofSneJaHr^l? 1 5? ^° ^ fi ** fc ~^ P^go S ical p rocs duref~ Conduce d 
cL«K! t i * V* fiel ? S of ■*«»**«. Unanistica and literature. Pro- 
cedures will depend upon the scat recent funds of information and will bT 
directed toward the most apparent needs of the group Credit 2-3 

216. SEMINAR IN SPANISH 

Comparable to 215 but m the field of Spanish. Credit 2-3 



] 









— ». 



■- 









- . 



_3_ 









' 




























-•*:>;- l t l- 






«gr, 






- 



i 






« - 






• 






Ars^l 




- 






Instruction - Continued 

ifua T* Bellamy, Instructor in English, September 1$ 1955 
Robert M e Bolsncl, Assists -ofessor of Musle 9 February 1, 1956 
rard F. Clancy, Visiting Lecturer in Physic®, September 1^ 1955 
.-man L, Cloutier, Visiting lecturer in Speech, September 1, 1955 
Alice T* Day, Instructor in Sociology, February 1, 1956 

E»„ &@lisle, Associate Professor of Botany, February 1, 1956 
rge B. %erj Instructor in Fnygical education, September 1, 1955 

n K Fr'ickaon, Instructor in Geology, September 1, 1955 
entine Gi&antti, Instructor in Romance Languages, February 1, 1956 
Iph W c Goodrich, Visiting lecturer in Education, September 1, 1955 
i, Mary £. W, Goes, Instructor in Sociology, September 1, 1955 
Louie S„ Greenbaum, Instructor ia History, September 1, 1955 
tenfold, Instructor in Psychology, September 1, 1955 
'. lieyn, Professor of EoonQi?J.cs5, September 1, 1955 
Id T, Jackson, Assistant Frofossor of Physical Education, February 1, 1956 
Jad Instructor in Food Technology, September 1, 1955 
!?ouben n, Instructor in Food 'technology, September 1, 1955 
id F s Leonard, Visiting Lecturer in History, September 1, 1955 
1 Lowonsteia, Visiting Professor of Government, February 1, 1956 

1 F. McCaffrey, Instructor in Education, February 1, 1956 
, Hints j Instructor in Psychology, September 1 9 1955 

Oliver, Instructor ia Mathematics, September 1, 1955 
trd, Visiting Lectoer in German, September 1, 1955 
vert J e Savereid, Instructor in Speech, February 1, 1956 
ward **<» Shea, Instructor in Business Administration, February 1, 1956 
i s. Mary L, ?app» instructor in Gorman j, September 1, 1955 
erett R # Turner, Jr 6? Instructor in Chemistry, February 1, 1956 
Eugene J* Tynan , Instructor in Geology, September 1, 1955 

Anthony J« Varjabsdlan, Visiting Professor of neuropsychiatry, February 1, 1956 
l&jrgaret S, sen. ing Lecturer in Sociology, September 1, 1955 

&3ERZMENT STAT IOH 
. Anderson, Assistant Beseech Professor of Beultry Husbandry, Sept, 15, 1955 
j, Bason* Research Instructor in Veterinary Science, June 1 9 1955 
to G, BaviSj Bc-search Instructor, Feeds and Fertilizers, Octocsr 3^ 1955 
I, Deri larch Instructor in Horns Economies, July IB ?I 1955 

;ant Research frofesgor, Seed Control, March 7, 1955 
rich Fenner, irch Instructor Dairy and Animal Science, Fobs 7, 1956 

Dairy and Animal Science, March 15, 1956 
rch Ihsti'uctor Feeds and Fertilizer s 9 Sopt« 19?. 1955 
Qyril M. Ifertin, In: »r R* sh Food Technology, September 12, 1955 

ructo: .■-.saroh Dairy and i-iniEal Science, March 21, 1956 
Lli&m E. r Veterinary Science, October 6, 1955 

Jr., aseafeh Feeds and Fertilisers, April 1, 1956 

, Rosa ■ Veterinary Science, August 22, 1955 

rt M. 6 9ai ion, Asaistani oh Professor, Cranberry Station, May 1, 1955 

ison, Instructor Research. Agricultural Economics, Feb* 1, 1956 
i&lston 8, fiead, Jr., Instruct ?searoii Bacteriology, April 1, 1956 



Part Time - Experiment Station 

lisabeth H a Elbert* Research Instructor Food Technology, July 1» 195$ 
Athannslos Xiratacmc* Instructor Research Food Technology* February 6, 1956 
Herman lopes* Instructor Bese&rch Wildlife* February 20 ? 1956 
Philip R. son, Jr. * Research Instructor Agronomy, July 1* 1955 
Kiyoshi Tsuji* Instructor Research Food Technology* July 1* 1955 
John M, White, Instructor Research AgronoEjy* July 1, 1955 

SXTBKSIOK SEOTIGB 
John R. Bragg, Assistant Extension Professor of Agricultural Economics* Feb* 15, 19! 
Hough, Assistant Extension Professor of Poultry Husbandry Fob. 15* 1955 

* LllisjQ J* lord* Assistant E&tenslon Professor of Pbmolegy* July 11, 1955 
Gilbert E c Mottla, Read of Dopartmeht of Communications ,> March 7, 1955 

rs* Shirley S, Weeks* Assistant Extension Professor of Hob© Economics, Jan. 1* 195! 

HIOMQTXOHS 

I&STRuCnQH 

; B. Allan, Associate Professor of English from Assistant Professor 
v\ Cahl Jr.* Dean of the College of Arts and Science froia Professor 
overnment 
atherine ft« Clarke* Associate Professor of French from Assistant Professor 

* Eichetrd M. Golwell* Professor of Accounting from Associate Frofessor 

■ : ;h Contino* Assistant Iirofessor of Music from Instructor 

isistant frofessor of Mechanical Engineering froia Instructor 
Srlick, Assistant Professor of Psychology from Instructor 

* Lng* Head of Department of Bosiancs Languages from Professor 

* Maanrell lead of Department o£ Bnglish from Professor 

Tom S. Hamilton* Jr.* Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture from ' Instructor 
>lph / ate*. Assistant Professor of Floriculture from Instructor 
. Keyecr* Professor of Metallurgy from Associate Professor 
■ \ Henry Kor Department of Eociology from Professor 

it IS. (ok* Head of Department of Speech from Professor 

ihj Assistant Professor of History from Instructor 
wton • of Marketing from Instructor 

Ldne^ : lesociatc Professor of Economics from Assistant Frofessor 

Professor of Accounting from Assistant Professor 
Solstad, - *jaat Professor of Ohemioal Engineering froia Instructor 
Glenn S. . r, Assistant Professor of Government from Instructor 
Mrs. Ann H c Trumbull, Assistant Professor of Education from Instructor 

-.•an &. Woodland* Assistant Professor of Geology and Mineralogy from Instructor 
yraond Wyaan* Associate Professor of Education and Director of Audio Visual 
Center* from Assistant Frofessor 



I 



RESIGNATIONS 

BCTRBCTIGN 

Hobert J. Allio, Instructor in Mechanical Engineering, August 31, 1955 

Frank D. Bartlett, Jr 9 , Inotruotor in Animal Husbandry, August 31* 1955 

Theodore K Batke, Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering, August 31, 1955 

Robert A 9 Bennett, Instructor, Veterinary Science, February 28, 1955 

Eichard W« Sutler, Instructor in Mechanical Engineering, August 31, 1944 

Hall G. Buasell, Instructor in Mathematics, August 31, 1955 

James W, Ghadwick, Jt, 9 Instructor in Animal Husbandry, A uguet 31, 1955 

iter E Conrad, Instructor in Chemistry, August 31, 1955 
Martin S, Gryan, Instructor in Food Technology, September 9, 1955 
Jack F» Davis, Ac; at -Professor of Physical Education, August 31, 1955 
lyle G. Beardsn, Instructor in Zoology, August 31, 1955 
Catherine A, Dower, Instructor in Education, January 31, 1956 
Unio Felliciottl, Instructor in Food Technology, August 31, 1955 
Arthur J Field, Instructor in Sociology, August 31, 1955 
AlFion S e Fish* Jr. , Instructor in Pomology, August 31, 1955 
John G* Fisher, Instructor in Geology, January 31, 1955 
Edith C e Forbes, Instructor in Home Economics, August 31, 1955 
Alice Georgantas, Instructor in Romance Languages, August 31, 1955 
Uirioh & c Goldsmith, Associate Professor of German, August 31> 1955 
Eva R. Grublcr, Instructor ia Psychology, ^ugust 31, 1955 
Mrs* Catherine- W, Irvin, Instructor in Home Economics, August 31, 1955 
William B e Johnson, Instructor in Olericulture, January 31, 1956 
Edviu H, Ketchl-adge, .Instructor in Botany, August 31, 1955 

id W, Knudaen, Instructor in Electrical. Engineering, August 31, 1955 

try Krats, Jr,, instructor in German, August 31, 1955 
Walter S. lake, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, May 31, 1955 

(aftsr sick leave) 
Lorraine X Lavallae, lestructor in Mathematics, August 31, 1955 
Bernard ftasner, Assistant Professor of Psychology, January 31, 1955 
Daniel J. McCarthy ^ Assistant Professor of Education, January 31, 1955 
William E. MeClennan, Jr„ , Instructor in Geology, August 31, 1955 
Gerald J» HoLindon, Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture, August 31, 1955 
Donald E. Hevsl, Instructor in Civil Engineering, August 31, 1955 
John G. Nicholson, Instructor in fnysice, August 31, 1955 
Donald J« Olsan, Instructor In History, August 31, 1955 
Donald S Seheufele, Instructor in Chemistry, August 31, 1955 
Ralph S e Schwarta, Instructor in Mathematics, August 31, 1955 
Leo Fo Solt, Instructor in History, August 31, 1955 

Herbert H Stapleton, Head of Dept* of Agric c Engineering, January 31, 1955 
Bene S* Taube, instructor in Romance Languages, August 31, 1955 
Theodore J« Wang, Assistant Professor of Rsyaice, August 31, 1955 



HSSXGSATID»$ * Continued 

SXJESaiMEfiT STATION 

Lso P. Beninato, Instructor, Research, Veterinary Science , September 16, 1955 
Sdward S. Eereatka, Instructor, Besearch, Feed® and Fertilizer*, Sept, 2, 1955 
Joan t, Cody, Instructor, Research, Feeds & Fertilisers, July 20 r 1955 
Richard H, Graves, Instructor, Research, Feeds ** Fertilisers, December 23, 1955 
Rathan L e Shiptafitz, Assistant Irofessor, Research, Veterinary Science, 

February 17, X955 
Pearl Kane, Instructor, Research, Homa Economics^ May 31, 1955 

OTRSSIOtf ssavicss 
Eobert C, Bimm>ms 9 Extension Editor, December 2, 1955 
Soger A* liolcott. Assistant Professor, Extension, Visual Aids, January 13, 1956 

ESSATHS 

msmucfioK 

Hairy G e Liadquist, Assistant Professor of O&ixy and Animal Science, December 1, 195 
D c Horace Kelson, Assistant Professor of Dairy and Animal Science, March 14, 1955 
Hay K* Torrey, Professor of Botany, Jp&uary 16, 1956 

EXTfiSSIOB SERVICE 

Lawrence V a k>y, Extension ftrofessor in Charge of Youth ftrograms, March 10, 1955 

KET2REHEN2S 
INSTESCTXOH 

iarlee F, v .ar, Head of Department of Romance Languag&s, Aug&st 31, 1955 

, Assistant Profseeor of Floriculture, August 31, 1955 
Victor A, Rice, Head of Department of Animal Husbandry, July 31, 1955 

ixmisim seevics 

Fayette E e Branch, Extension Professor of Agricultural Economics, January 3> f 1956 
Wsllesley o Harrington, Extension firofossor of Engineering, January 6, 195& 
I'ilUir H e Thi€3 f Extension Professor of Eorticnilture* January yi 9 1955 



■7k 



Previously reported to Board of Trustees! 



TOJIlgl fl OF MASSACHUSETTS CQMMQI^EALTH SGHQ UBSH1F S 
THE SELECTION PHOGESS - 1956 



)2 applications (22© fro® wosea and 272 from m«a) wre 
red this year and all w©r@ prosegg©d through the College 
Scholarship S&ndesr located at Princeton $ N©v Jersey.. Scoring 
for aaad was don® in Inhere t« 

8ffeetiv» selection by the Ohi^arsity of Massachusetts 

Scholar ahlp Csamittee is best shown by the following tables 



23 Applicants 
442 Applicants Raeommendad 
jp&l „ Selec t^ „ tg>.J^aatgfiflL 



Calculated first ystar^s r@eaurc@s 

Parents lncc®# 

In com* tax paid by parents 

Per c*nt of fsalliss with a sas 5 

Average model of car J year) 

Applicant' 1 s savings 

Ho« d®p<§nd®nt children in family 

far cent A e s in High School 



573© 


2553 


495 


59 


aa 


56 


1951 


1943 


367 


294 


2Jq3 


2*7 


38 


53 



WOMEIi APPEICAITC5 (CLASS- OF ^1960) 
ESBED BY fHE UHITOSm, SCHOLARSHIP COMMITI 

qqmmokwbalih scKO LB5^ii.5 r 



RAM 



C0U5TT 



6 



Davey, Judith 

Iteurke, Marilyn 
Karl, Elisabeth 



Brodsur, G®23s&in© 
.s. St© via 



Worcester 

Southbrr^c, 

Lowell 

Htchburg 



Jamaica Plain 



Fall River 



Brockton 



Worcester 
Worcester 
Essex 
Worcester 

Bristol 



Suffolk 
Bristol 
Plymouth 



PROBABLE MAJOS 

c& a tty ' ■"- 1 VTJ , M.-mwi"giji i»a rogapca>q5tt» 

Home Econoaics 
Arts & Science 
Political Science 



B&bbfl M&rjorl* 



Arts & Science 
Arts & Science 
Efaglish 

Arts & Science 
Arts & Science 
Arts & Science 



rATES (16) 



11 


Roberts, Jennet 


Greenfield 


Franklin 


Business Admin 


12 


Abrams, Judith 


Pittsfield 


Berkshire 


Education 


13 


Parker 9 Nancy A* 


V. Springfield 


Hampden 


Education 


u 


s 

FLnn«ran, Frances 


Pall Biwr 


Bristol 




15 


Austin, Mary C* 


Chicope* 


Hampden 


Home Economics 


16 


Boegar, Judith 


Pro^ilncgtswa 


Barnstable 


Liberal Arts 


17 


Burgas®, Agnss 


Manchester 


Essex 


Psychology 


13 


Buska, Elsie 


Turners Falls 


Franklin 


Uursing 


19 


Dunsford, Janice 


Orleans 


Barnstable 


Sociology 


I ^ 


Eershfield, Sandra 


Lawrence 


Esses 


Arts & Science 


21 


Parley, ftoTa Lee 


Horthbridge 


Worcester 


Liberal Arts 



/ l/l 



ram SHS WSimMm 

pj^ jo^. ~— *- 

22 8tolBtarg 9 !!«««• *«*•*•* SttffoS* 

Canto *<"* olk Ch«ai*UT 

Vtmacmth Norfolk Liberal iris 

£e!si®F* Mary Weyaoran 

» *, -a Z&mx Arts & Science 

25 Usie, Sussim® Bradford ***** 

Baragtable Agrictatw* 



2 



1 



1 



Wm. APPLICANTS (CLASS OF IQftri 

BEOCMMBNBED BY THE miWRSlfl SSHOLABSHIP COMMITTEE TO HBCKTTO 

GCMCTTO&fH BCHQlIbsHIPS (ft 



PROBABLE 



5 



7 



9 

10 
11 
12 



15 



17 
18 

19 

21 



Looney, Bobert E« 
Walsh, Robert A* 
Cutter, Edward J. 
Broeknan^ Alan 
Mendes, Maurice 
Watson, B©b©rt L* 
Be®d, Peter W« 
foel, Carringtcn F. 
Bube, Micha©! J. 
Brinson, Everett V» 
Segal, Bich&rd L* 
Bancroft, Russell H* 
Miller, L®@ K* 
Volpe, Joseph J» 



Skura, Arthur 
Stents, Bi chard ? 
Qu&trale, Richard F, 
Seneftfc&ugh, Lavson P* 
Knight, John F., Ill 
Ekl'&gtd, J«sa A* 



Sm 


COUBTI 


fyUOR 


Mi tri sae 


Essex 


Science 


Revere 


Suffolk 


Engineering 


Cambridge 


Middlesex 




Kedford 


Middlesex 




Brighton 


Suffolk 


Marketing 


Sagamore 


Barnstable 


E&gineering 


Bedford 


Middlesex 




West Bridgew&ter 


Plymouth 


Science 


Stirling 


Worcester 




Athol 


Worcester 


Physical Bdu 


Great Barrington 


Berkshire 




Boxbtary 


Suffolk 


Biology 


Chesterfield 


Hampshire 


Liberal Arts 


Dorchester 


Suffolk 


Mathematics 


Salsa 


Essex 




ALTERKATBS (u) 






Lynn 


Essex 


Bio & Chen 


East Lon^aeadov 


Hampden 




Htchburg 


¥orcester 


Pr ©-Medical 


Brewster 


Barnstable 




Somen&lle 
Ashland 


Middlesex 
Middlesex 





I 






■=> &L «*• 



MM 



23 

Si 

25 
26 



33 



22 Golder, Wendell S, 



T&uatoa 
Springfield 
Brenn©a, B&^id W« Cambridge 
Gigllotti, Bon&Xd A* Korth Adaas 
Michelaiddi, Michael R. Fall River 
Gold, Howard Fall Rirsr 

'Bssssl, Gtanther H* 
. : ,Eesta # Shosias M* 
30 Stedolgkis, Anthony 



Kori&rty, Bosald 



Spring. 
Men son 



Miller, Willies M 



'4 a 



34 S&ek8&&ry, Stephen M 

35 Mssrito, John D. 

36 Bock, Mchard G 

37 HcManu®, Edward H* 



38 lltapfctriek, Thoaas B. Holliston 

3^ &dk, JV^ncis L. £ ag t BrookfisXd 



PROBABLE 



mm 


mm 


Bristol 




Esmpden 


Physics 


Middlesex 


Snglish 


Berk shire 


Chem or Physics 


Bristol 


Chemistry 


Bristol 




Hampshire 


Chemistry 


Essex 


Science 


Hampden 


Physics 


Hampden 




Suffolk 




Suffolk 




Suffolk 




Suffolk 




Franklin 





Liberal Art® or 



Physical Edt&eation 



Worcester 



•/ 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF. SEMI-ANNUAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
June 2, 1956, 10:30 a.m., Dining Commons, Amherst 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 

Provost McCune and Dean Cahill attended the meeting at the 

invitation of the Chairman 

PRESENT : Trustees, Bartlett, Brown, Miss Buxton, 
Cashin, Crowley, Desmond, Haigis, 
Mrs. McNamara, Taber, Whitmore, President 
Mather, Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Burke 

On the recommendation of the President, it was 
unanimously 

VOTED: To appoint Dr. John S. Harris as Professor 
of Government effective September 1, 1956 
at annual salary of $6180. 

On the recommendation of the President, it was 
unanimously 

VOTED: To name Roy E. Moser, Extension Professor 
of Agricultural Economics and Farm Manage- 
ment, Emeritus, effective on his retirement 
May 24, 1956. 

And to name Horace M. Jones, Extension Pro- 
fessor of Youth Work, Emeritus, effective on 
his retirement May 31, 1956. 

On the recommendation of the faculty and of the Presi- 
dent, it was unanimously 

VOTED: To award the following degrees to the Candi- 
da Listed on the attached Commencement 
program for June 1956. 

College of Arts and Science 
209 Bachelor of Arts 
94 Bachelor of Science 

College of Agriculture 

67 Bachelor of Science 
1 Bachelor of Vocational Agriculture 

School of Business Administration 

89 Bachelor of Business Administration 



1905 



Harris 
John S, 



Moser, Roy E, 
Emeritus 



Jones , 
Horace M. 

Emeritus 



Degrees 



1906 



TRUSTEE 



Animal 
Heal th 
Building 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



School of Engineering 

9 Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering 

.16 Bachelor. of . Science in Civil Engineering 

20 Bachelor of Science in ElecLi 

21 Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 

School of Home Economics 

41 Bachelor of Science 

Division of Physical Education 
6 Bachelor of Science 

Total - 573 

On the recommendation of the faculty of the Graduate 

School and of ■ the President, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To award the following degrees to the candi- 
dates as listed on the attached Commencement 
program for June 1956. 

3 Bachelor of Landscape Architecture 
1 Master of Landscape Architecture 
9 Master of Arts 
43 Master of Science 
9 Master of Business Administration 
8 Doctor of Philosophy 

Total - 73 

Grand Total ~ 646 

Treasurer Johnson reported that bids have been opened 

for construction of the large animal isolation building. There 

is a spread. of. about $13,000 between the high bid and the low bid 

and a spread of about $5,000 between the low bid and the next 

lowest bid. He said that the donor of the funds for this project, 

nS Harriet G. Bird, is anxious to see this building completed 

as soon as possible. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth W. 
Johnson, to award contract to D. A. 
Sullivan and Sons, Inc., low bidder on 
the large animal isolation building, at 
an adjusted price which will not exceed 
the $50,000 in the Pved Acre Building Fund 
donated by Miss Harriet G. Bird. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was announced that the next meeting of the Board 
would be on Thursday, July 5, beginning with luncheon at 12:30 at 
the Hotel Statler in Boston. 

President Mather expressed his appreciation to the 
Board and to the staff of the University for their support and aid 
during the past year. He said that the main problem on which he 
has been working is the relationship of the University to the 
general fiscal problem of the state. He said that a point has 
been reached where the fiscal resources of the state are in- 
adequate to support the various state institutions. The Univer- 
sity has been receiving adequate appropriations for buildings but 
inadequate support for staff and operations. The current budget 
of the Commonwealth has eliminated the University's request for 
20 new teaching positions to maintain its present 13 to 1 ratio 
of students to teachers. Also eliminated are the 54 requested 
promotions of teachers to bring the University staff to the same 
level position-wise as the State Teachers Colleges. 

The President pointed out that the turnover rate among 
teachers is beginning to increase and will accelerate as salaries 
go up elsewhere and remain constant here. He said that every 
effort will be made to obtain necessary promotions and new 
positions in the supplementary budget. 

President Mather said that the Federal inspectors were 
on the campus last week to determine eligibility of the University 
to receive Federal Funds for the year beginning July 1, 1956. The 
inspectors warned the President that Federal Funds in the amount 
of $784,000 may be withdrawn by the Federal Government because of 



1907 



Federal 
Funds 



1908 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



interference by the State with the expenditure of these funds by 
the Director of the Experiment Station and the Director of the 
Extension Service. June 21, 1956 is the final date for deciding 
the fate of these funds for next year. Unless the University is 
in position by June 21 to declare that state interference has 
ceased, the Federal Funds will be withdrawn. About 165 employees 
are involved. 

The President pointed out another problem which the 
University faces. It has $8,000,000 in state funds for new build- 
ings but construction costs have advanced recently to the extent 
that all bids being received are above the amount appropriated for 
the projects. 

The President pointed out that during the past three 
years he has spent much of his time and energy traveling through- 
out the state addressing groups to gain support for needs of the 
University. He has made some 750 public addresses and traveled 
39,000 miles. He feels that this phase of his work should be 
diminished and that during the coming year he should devote most 
of his attention to problems on the campus. 

Chairman Bartlett thanked the President for his excellent 
report and for his untiring efforts in behalf of the University. 

The Trustees discussed the seriousness of the possible 
withdrawal of Federal Funds and agreed that passage of the 
Freedom Eill is the best solution to this problem. It was 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED: To prepare a letter to be addressed to the 
Chairman of the House Ways and Means 
Committee and Chairman of the Senate Ways 
and Means Committee calling attention to 
the need for passage of the Freedom Bill 
especially in view of the time element 
involved in the certification for Federal 
Funds . 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:15 p.m. 




Secretary 



/ ^^^>^=Ztk: chai 



| r~~~ 






1909 



Freedom 
Bill 



1910 



TRUSTEE 



New 
Courses 



Ph.D. Program 
in Zoology 



William Angus 
Laing 



N. May Larson, 
Emeritus 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



July 5, 1956, 1:30 p.m., Hotel Statler, Boston, Mass 



Chairman Bartlett presiding 



PRESENT : Trustees Bartlett, Boyden, Brett, 

Brown, Miss Buxton, Cashin, Crowley, 
Desmond, Haigis, Hawes , Mrs. McNamara, 
Taber, Whitmore, President Mather, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Burke 



Dr. Boyden presented report for the Trustee Committee on 

Faculty and Program of Study and on the recommendation of this 

committee, it was 

VOTED: To approve the attached new undergraduate 
courses . 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was 

VOTED : To approve the attached new graduate 
courses. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was 

VOTED : To approve the offering by the Department 
of Zoology of a program leading to the 
Ph.D. degree. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was 

VOTED : To award the degree Bachelor of Business 
Administration to William Angus Laing 
effective July 5, 1956. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was 

VOTED : To name Mrs. N. May Larson, Extension Pro- 
fessor of Home Economics, Emeritus, effective 
on the date of her retirement May 31, 1956. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was 

VOTED : To name Grunow 0. Oleson, Extension Pro- 
fessor of Communications, Emeritus, effective 
on the date of his retirement May 31, 1956. 

The Trustees discussed the recommendation of the 
Committee on Faculty and Program of Study concerning the establish- 
ment of a University Faculty Senate. In view of the need for full 
consideration of the University budget and other matters on the 
agenda, it was felt that action should be deferred on the Faculty 
Senate until a later meeting. Accordingly it was unanimously 

VOTED : To defer consideration of the University 
Faculty Senate until the October meeting 
of the Board. 

Mr. Brett reported for the Finance Committee and stated 
that the Finance Committee had met but had nothing to report re- 
quiring action of the Trustees. 

President Mather recommended the appointment of Thomas 

A. Culbertson as Director of the Student Union and read 

correspondence between him and the planning committee of the 

Student Union on the subject of the appointment of a Director. 

After hearing reports and recommendations of the committee and the 

recommendation of the President, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To appoint Thomas A. Culbertson as Director 
of the Student Union effective September 1, 
1956 at annual salary of $7,080. 

The Trustees considered the budget of the University for 

the year beginning July 1, 1957. President Mather and Treasurer 

Johnson answered questions and explained the various budget items 

as information was called for by members of che Board. After 

discussion, it was 



1911 



Grunow 0. 

Oleson, 

Emeritus 



University 

Faculty 

Senate 



Thomas A. 
Culbertson 

Director of 
Student Union 



1912 



Maintenance 
Budge c 



TRUSTEE 



Special 

Budget 

Items 



Federal 
Funds 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : To authorize the administration to submit 

a maintenance budget for the year beginning 
July 1, 1957 in the amount of $7,906,955. 

It was also 

VOTED : To authorize the administration to submit 
the following special budget items for the 
year beginning July 1, 1957: 

Reimbursable Research $50,000 

Commonwealth Scholarships 25,000 

Library Books .'.. 100,000 

Roads, walks and parking areas 200,000 

President Mather reported on the matter of certification 
and clearance of Federal Funds to follow up the discussion of the 
June Board meeting on this subject. He said that since the June 
meeting a conference was held in the Governor's Office attended 
by Governor Herter, the Governor's Secretary Mr. Stimpson, 
President Mather, Dean Sieling, Director of Extension Dayton, 
Deputy Director of Personnel Mr. Walsh, Commissioner of Administra 
tion Mr. Sheridan and representatives of the Federal Department of 
Agriculture. At this meeting the Governor said that he could not 
assure passage of the Freedom Bill but that he could assure that 
positions being held up by the Division of Personnel would be 
cleared. The Federal representatives agreed that if the President 
certified to them that Federal positions were cleared and that 
there was no longer interference on the part of the State with 
the expenditure of Federal Funds, they would be willing to certify 
clearance of Federal Funds for Massachusetts for another year. 
President Mather pointed out that this is normal procedure; that is 
that Federal Funds are always approved for one year at a time. 
Immediately upon returning from the Governor's Office, the Presi- 
dent prepared a list of positions for which he needed clearance. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



This list was submitted to the Governor and subsequently cleared. 
Therefore, the University is assured of Federal Funds for the 
year beginning July 1, 1956. 

President Mather also reported that on Tuesday , July 3, 
he had been given hearing by the House Ways and Means Commit Lee on 
the Freedom Bill. The bill has been re-written but he is 
satisfied that it gives the Trustees the complete authority which 
they sought and the bill has since been passed unanimously by the 
Ways and Means Committee. 

The President reported that in view of the severe budget 
reductions for the year beginning July 1, 1956, he has filed a 
supplementary budget of $461,790. All items in the supplementary 
budget were previously approved by the Board for the original 
budget. Copies were distributed to the Trustees. 

President Mather reported on the Barrington classifica- 
tion survey of State employees. He said that their report has 
just been submitted and that by and large it is an excellent re- 
port particularly as it affects the salaries of the teaching 
staff, of the University. He submitted statements of present 
salaries of University employees, of their salaries as proposed by 
the Barrington Associates, and of their salaries as proposed in 
the University budget for the year beginning July 1, 1957. See 
attached copy. 

Upon the recommendation of President Mather, it was 

VOTED ; To approve the promotion of Bradford D. 
Crossmon from Associate Professor "A" 
in Agricultural Economics to Professor 
"A" in Agricultural Economics effective 
July 29, 1956. Mr. Crossmon succeeds 
Roy E. Moser. 



1913 



Freedom 
Bill 



Barrington 
Survey 



Bradford D. 
Crossmon 



1914 



TRUSTEE 



Clarence 
Hinkley 
Knowlton 
Scholarship 



Veterans 

Administration 

Regulations 



Western 
Massachusetts 
Electric 
Company 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Treasurer Johnson reported bequest of $15,000 from 
Clarence Hinkley Knowlton of Hingham - income of which is to pro- 
vide for scholarships for girls in Home Economics. It was 

VOTED : To accept with appreciation the bequest 
of $15,000 from the estate of Clarence 
Hinkley Knowlton of Hingham for the en- 
dowment fund with the income to be used 
as specified for scholarships to de- 
serving women students of Home Economics. 

It was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth W. 
Johnson, to sign for and in the name of 
the Board of Trustees negotiated contract 
No. V300IV-2087 with the Veterans Ad- 
ministration for education and training 
for the period July 2, 1956 to May 31, 1957. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that there will be only a few 

veterans from now on under Public Law 16 and it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth W. 
Johnson, to sign for and in the name of 
the Board of Trustees all negotiated con- 
tracts with the Veterans Administration 
for education and training under P.L. 16. 

The Treasurer reported that the Western Massachusetts 

Electric Company cannot begin supplying additional current 

July 1, 1956 as originally planned and further that the University 

has not completed its installations to receive this power July 1. 

It was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth W. 
Johnson, to execute an amendment to the 
contract with the Western Massachusetts 
Electric Company dated August 30, 1955 
for modification of service for the period 
July 1, 1956 to October 31, 1956. 

The Treasurer reported cash variance in the amount of 
$2.09 for the year ending June 30, 1956. This variance 
occurred in the handling of about $2,000,000 in cash transactions 
in the Treasurer's Office. It was 



: tn4j Coiaialttea 



:sh 



>£ eleven 

a o£ exit i &t.rag®ad. 

urs ' Credit 3 

: /: ... A cc Sanation of English 77, 

gelve ■ "■ " and 1950 5 with 

t ..:: c . .: ' - : vises reflected is the fiction, 

■ "a 11 and 78, 

i - i ;w Credit 3 



s 



83 I ... Seated group of the ssajor ric&a .Writers 

■■.-:• Uisfea-, The authors" to fee 
: .' a " '".•■' wili traon, Hawthorne, Longfellow, 

...■ ."■ lass, '. '614 siad BSiiiifcgtmy. A e&ra- 

Li »111 ■: the varying literary form® given to 

.. .: nd the conflict: between the individual 

jiety, 

3 ■ tre Crodit 3 

: . . it js: 2* 25, 26 

II A .' ,./ c*£ ssajor Jteaerican writers oi 

ifch and aarly twentieth ces .7. The. authors to he read 
and disc : Cooper, Poa s MelVilte, 'Thereau, Hhit®an, 

•., Sinclair Lewie, an ilkner. A careful 

• . oS i:ho vax . literary forsas .'.73s to such 

, -. and the conflict be i in4i<?i$ut£X 

y. 
3 Claj rs Credit 3 

.._.. ss: .. $3 . ; I, 2, 25, I 

.1 . san Iij ' . .An 

...... . , . . . .; ■ :j£ 

11: : .-■. ■ . ' ■ :. of .- g>ther 

\ rm, p9\ . scted with 

cr.\ .' C ' ■ • ■■ - vol; $3 i ' : .' •.. 

Credit 1-3 
iqo; . : oh l» 2, 25, 2.6 

i '. : Literal Intended previously 

3. 0| . - . .-'.,-; 3 ion and is accordance 

of '. . rant c ng. This course would provide 

portui ■•• for the . . .aaatio linss o£ d< Df>ment in literary 

Logy a >ryj and in the study c£ language 
and lite .. The ^ea-xlsga in the courae will be drawn largely 

rtant Esg ' writers, but relevant material txom other 
&nd literature will ba us 

Credit 1-3 
- ites: Sngliah 1, 2, 23, 56 



2- 



S 



GOVEB&KNX 78 IX-H0BIC1ML MMX^lS'TE&riOH, A efcudy of ad&ialstr&tive 
taanegeiBBiit in-ite&riean amticip&litles feasad 
esse - u&tarials end personal obsasrvation. F 

be given to ISassacausatta cities, and towns. 

3 Class hours Credit 3 

CM3VEKNHSISX SO XI HU33SCXFAL LAB. A study oi the legal problem ©neountased 
in the eraation &rtd operation of local government. 
will be s^da to H&MftcbsNpatts cities, tosms and count lot. 
3 Class hoore Credit 3 

JOOWLXSH 75 MS CG^HJSICASIOH, A stady c£ news writing and aditing 
for tho press* radio and fc&iv&slon. Stress is placed upon writing 
techniques for tfeo efficient transi&isaioa of infos ion, am! upon 
concepts ^hieh soak to explain tsbat happons in tae p^ocseg in which 
Beanings ar@ transmitted. 
3 Cl&s© &©nr$ Credit 3 



GEASOASE COURSES 



The following new courses are recommended by the Graduate School 
Council . 

ASSLlCyl.TURAL ECONOMICS ®03< Advanced Food Marketing. Interrelationships of 
markets and prices, xsarkatlag margins, efficiency techniques, demand &tu& 
supply Analysis. 
Prerequisite; Agricultural Economics 155 or permission of instructor. 

Credit 3. 

iigRIC^UEPSAT. ESOrajTXg 205^ Ranearcb Hethods in Production Economics. A 

consideration of procedures and techniques applied in economic analysis 
of the f&rrtij including feudgating (comparative statistics), linear pro- 
gressing and other quantitative processes. 
Prerequisite: Agricultural Sconomics 175 or instructor's penalssion. 

Credit 3. 

PO'JLi&IT 207. Advanced Poultry Nutrition, lectures and reports on research 
?B3thods and designs for poultry nutrition experiments * Also discussion 
of current research developments and theories. 
Prerequisites; Chanistry 151, 152, and 179; Poultry 156 or equivalent. 

Credit 3. 

ASXKAL HBS-BAftBBY 216. Fertility and Fecundity. An advanced course in reproductive 
physiology, dealing with the role of heredity, nutrition, pathology end 
environment in the determination of fertility and fecundity in mammalian 
forms. Emphasis in the classroom and laboratory will he placed on current 
research directed toward control of reproductive function through experi- 
mental fteans. 
Prerequisites 175 or equivalent and Zoology 187. Credit 3. 

AMIH^_EU3BA |fflS.Y 226. The Histology of Domestic Animals. An intensive study 
of the tissues and organs of domestic animals. Special essphssis is placed 
on those tissues and organ systems tAtich have particular economic or 
physiological significance in the fields of livestock production, meats, 
nutrition, milk secretion and animsl breeding, the microscopic structure 
of the skin and its iwdif ica t ions, fat, muscle, bene, endocrine glands, 
digestive system and genital systems of farm animala is stressed 9^ re- 
lated to function. 
Prerequisites $ Zoology 150, veterinary Science 175 or equivalent. Credit 3. 



AXXM&L28&&i£Mr > 229, 230. Seminar. Reports on current literature. 



Credit 3 
each semester. 



CBB3£X STBY 2S5 . Research Problems. Xhe student will prepare a proposal for a 
research problem not directly related to his thesis topic if the latter 
has been selected, the problem will involve primarily library research. 
A committee of three dspartmani. members will approve the student's topic 
not later than £our weeks from the start of the semester and conduct an 
oral examination before the end of the semester in which the topic was 
approved. A written report must be submitted and approved by the 
commit tea one &&ek before the examination, Required of ell candidates 
for the Ph.D. in Chemistry and must be cowpleted before the candidate's 
preliminary examination for the degree. Credit 5. 



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3*, 



FSYGHOIXXSY 245 . The Psychology of Exceptional Children. A cons idarat ion of 
uhe etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of exceptional children. Special 
emphasis will be pieced on intellectual, social physical and sensory 
deviations. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 82 or 182, 83 or 235, 94 or 194. Students 

having only two of these three prerequisites say take 
the course on consent of the instructor. Credit 3. 

This course is designed to complete the minims* curriculum required by 
the State for certification of school psychologists and also to aid in 
the Comaontrealth's program to educate exceptional children. 



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UNIVERSITY OP MASSACHUSETTS 



DISBURSEMENTS -« UNRESTRICTED ENDOWMENT FUNDS 
FOR THE PERIOD JULY 1, 1955~JUNE 30, 1956 



Burnham Emergency 

John Ho DIttfach - Travel to Michigan $ 8'2 87 

University Commons ~ Trusts© Luncheon 3q8Q 

3 meals 
Mrs Demsey, Mrs Connolly, Ij. hrs labor, Ij. e 0Q 

Business Of Hears Conference 
Mitchell KoXdy, 2l± Prints - Dr Q McCune l8 o 00 

? Burnham Prizes, f'525 and $15 Jj-QoOQ 

Total $1)4.8067 

F re ds r lck__Ho Re ad 

Scholarships & 7?<»90 

Total ~" 7?o90 

W 11 1 i am _Ro ^S e s s ions 

University Commons => 6 Meals $ 9 o 00 

n n - 3 meals lu50 

w n - 25 Meals, New Faculty 23o75 

Members 
University Commons - 8 Meals, Ways & Means o0 

Committee 
Everett A Kosarlck - 5 pictures of £c.0Q 

Stockb ridge Facade 
President Mather - reimbursement for tele grams 8 75 
Gulf Oil Coo « gasoline for trip to Cape k-*k3 

by Pre s Mather 
Everett A Q Kosarlck « l\.Q reprints of buildings 20' o 00 
University Commons « 7 Dinners 6 65 

Carl Howard <= l\. Construction Progress shots, iSoOO 

l\. reprints 
American Council on Education = 75 = Hena, 

Volo #8 
University Commons - Administrative Groups - 

•lij. Meals 
University Commons - Military Luncheon - 

7 Meals 
University Commons - Trustee Luncheon « 3 Meals 

Total ll[7o06 




Disbursements - Unrestricted Endowment Funds, Page 2 



William Wheeler 



Kraushar Press, 1200 Invitations Freshman 

Reception 
Allen Whixon - Revision of U of M Maps 
Arthur C Q Egan, Jr 6 - 10 Prints, KQTC Review, 

8 Prints of Commencement 
Everett A e Kosarick - Pictures of new 

Dormitories 
Northampton & Boston Express « return of 

pictures « Mass Q Audubon Society 
So Go Goding - Travel to New York City 
Pres Mather -. reimbursement for meals in Boston 
University Commons - 7 Dinners, Deans, Land 

Grant Colleges 
Everett A Kosarick - 2 pictures Engineering 

Bldgo - 10 pictures Stockbridge Hall 



Council 



Luncheon 

Mather 
Meeting 



University Commons - Women's 

Everett Ao Kosarick - 1 picture Pres 

Hotel Statler - 3 Luncheons, Trustee 

John Ho Vondell « Photo Service 

Hotel Statler - 2 Luncheons 8 Trustee Meeting 

University Commons - ij. Meals 

Parker House - Luncheons 

Montgomery's Rose Garden - flowers for Prof© 

Graham's Funeral 
Gilbert E e Mottla - Photographic Services & Re= 

imburseraent for Telegrams 
Hotel Statler «- 3 Luncheons, Trustee Meeting 
University Commons - 3 Dinners, Bldgo and 

Grounds Committee 
University Commons * 10 Luncheons 
Everett Ao Kosarick - ll\. Reprints of Buildings 
University Commons - 20 Meals for Business Group 

" -3 Meals, Four College Group 
Mrs L Ao Price - 2 Dinners , guests of Univ 
University Commons - 6 Luncheons, Trustee Meeting 

Total 



$ 3^o50 

6o00 
2Q<,00 

il^oo 
8019 

20 086 

23 o0 

8.9 

9 oo 

3o00 

i?o33 

20,00 
10 o £0 

6„00 

9o82 
10 a 00 

2?&h, 

17o30 

2o85 

9o50 

lOoOO 

i?o95 

?o8£ 
2o?$ 
9o00 



TOTAL DISBURSEMENTS - UNRESTRICTED FUNDS 



§320o7£ 
S689o35 



Parker House - Meals 

Mrso Frank A Singer - Reception for Dean 

Cahill & Provost McCune 
Walter Whit turn » Printing 6 page folder 
Woods Hole Scholarship 

Dean Hopkins - Travel to Boston & Return 
Dr Q Do L Farnsworth - Professional Services 

Total 



$ 92o92 
50o00 

200o00 

305 o 00 



$86l o 02 



USTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED ; To authorize the writing off of a shortage 
of $2.09 of cash variances of the cashier 
for the year ending June 30, 1956 from the 
Trust Fund Interest Account. 

The Treasurer distributed the attached report of dis- 
bursements from Endowment Funds and from the Sprague Fund during 
the past year and it was 

VOTED : To approve the expenditures of the President 
of unrestricted Endowment Funds income of 
$689.35 and Sprague Funds of $861.02 for the 
fiscal year ending June 30, 1956 in accordance 
with the attached itemized account. 

It was 

VOTED : To authorize the President to spend from 
unrestricted Endowment Fund income $1,000 
and Sprague Fund $1,000 for the period 
July 1, 1956 to June 30, 1957. 

< 
The meeting was adjourned at 5:10 p.m. 



1915 



Cash 
Shortage 




1 ^s^cvj&^t 



Secretary 



Chairman 



Sprague 
Fund 



Unrestricted 
Trust Funds 



1916 



TRUSTEE 



Chemistry 
Laboratory 



Science 
Center 



Steam 
Lines 



Electric 
Lines 



Athletic 
Facilities 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

September 7, 1956, 12:30 p.m., Dining Commons, 
University of Massachusetts, Amherst 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Bartlett, Boyden, Brett, 

Brown, Miss Buxton, Cashin, Crowley, 
Desmond, Haigis, Taber, Whitmore, 
President Mather, Treasurer Johnson, 
Provost McCune, Secretary Burke 

Trustee Whitmore reported for the Committee on Buildings 

and Grounds and on the recommendation of that committee, it was 

VOTED : To approve final plans for the addition 
to the Chemistry Building as prepared by 
Appleton and Stearns of Boston. 

It was also 

VOTED : To approve preliminary plans for the 

Science Center as prepared by James H. 
Ritchie Associates of Boston. 

It was also 

VOTED : To approve contract #1 project U-702 

for steam line extension by the Hartwell 
Company as completed August 9, 1956. 

It was also 

VOTED : To approve contract #2 project U-702 
for electric line extension by the 
M. L. Schmidt Company as completed 
August 9, 1956. 

It was also 

VOTED : To approve the layout in sheet #2 of 
sketches prepared by the Landscape 
Architecture Department dated August 
1956 and showing immediately needed 
athletic fields. 

Trustee Brett reported for the Committee on Finance and 

it was 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : To ratify and confirm the sale of 200 

shares of Alcoa stock on August 2, 1956. 

President Mather said that some time ago the Rockefeller 
Foundation proposed a cooperative program between Hokkaido Univer- 
sity in Sapporo, Japan and the University of Massachusetts. The 
President said that Hokkaido was established 80 years ago and that 
one of the chief movers in establishment of the University was 
Professor William S. Clark, third President of the University of 
Massachusetts. Professor Clark is still remembered, in fact 
revered in Japan to this day. After some negotiations with the 
Rockefeller Foundation the project was turned over to the Inter- 
national Cooperation Administration of the State Department. The 
ICA would like to have President Mather, Dean Sieling and Assistant 
Professor Zahradnik travel to Hokkaido to examine the possibilities 
of developing a program of technical assistance involving exchange 
of scientists, particularly in the field of Agriculture. All ex- 
penses of the preliminary investigations will be borne by ICA. 
After discussion the Trustees 

VOTED: To authorize President Mather, Dean Sieling 
and Assistant Professor Zahradnik to travel 
to Japan for a period of approximately one 
month on the business of the University and 
on salary to investigate feasibility of 
establishing a cooperative program with 
Hokkaido University under auspices of the 
International Cooperation Administration. 

The Trustees also 

VOTED : To authorize the Provost to act for the 
President on personnel and other matters 
during the absence of the President and 
authorized him specifically under the by- 
laws of the Trustees and the provisions 
of Chapter 556 of the Acts of 1956 to act 
in the name of and for the Board of Trustees 
in all personnel matters requiring immediate 
action for the operation of the University 
during the absence of the President. 



1917 



Stock " 



Hokkaido 
University 



1918 



TRUSTEE 



Honorary 
Degree 

Harusada 
Suginome 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The Trustees 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to execute 
contract No. P10/T88-11-019-3-70009 
under date of September 7, 1956 in the 
name of and for the Board of Trustees 
with the International Cooperation Ad- 
ministration for reimbursement of 
travel and other expenses not to exceed 
$9,000 for certain University staff 
members to go to the University of 
Hokkaido, Sapporo, Japan to determine 
the feasibility of establishing a program 
of international exchange; and to establish 
a Trust Fund account for the administration 
of this contract. 

President Mather said that although he has vouchers in 

the amount of $9,000 from ICA, it will be a week or two before 

these vouchers can be cashed on the Federal Treasury. Meantime, 

to raise funds for the expense of the travel to Japan, he and 

the Treasurer have signed personal notes for $7,500. Accordingly 

it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to use $7,500 
plus interest of ICA funds when this 
money is received as provided in the 
contract to pay $7,500 plus interest to 
those who advanced the money to make 
the trip possible. 

On the recommendation of the University Committee on 

Honorary Degrees and of the President, it was 

VOTED : To award the degree Doctor of Laws, 
honoris causa, to Harusada Suginome, 
President of the University of 
Hokkaido - this degree to be awarded 
by President Mather in Sapporo, Japan, 
September 15, 1956. 

The President and Provost presented detailed informa- 
tion concerning a number of appointments and promotions to the 
grade of Professor. After discussion, it was 



TRUSTEE 



VOTED: 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



To approve the following list of promotions 
from the grade of Associate Professor to 
Professor effective September 1, 1956. 



George W. Cannon, Department of Chemistry, $7080 

Robert S. Feldman, Department of Psychology, $6780 

James M. Ferrigno, Department of Romance Languages, $5085 

Karl N. Hendrickson, Department of Civil Engineering, $7080 

C. Wendell King, Department of Sociology, $6180 

Joseph W. Langford, Jr. , Department of Electrical Engineering, 

$7080 
Henry N. Little, Department of Chemistry, $6780 
William H. Ross, Department of Physics, $7080 
James G. Snedecor, Department of Physiology, $6780 
H. Leland Varley, Department of English, $6780 

The Trustees also approved the following appoint- 
ments of Professors effective September 1, 1956: 

Lee E. Holt, Professor of English at salary of $6180 
Edward P. Clancy (one-third time) , Professor of Physics 

at salary of $2060 
John R. King (two-thirds time), Professor of Music at 

salary of $4120 

On the recommendation of President Mather, the Trustees 

approved promotion of the following Associate Professors "A" to 

Professor "A" in the College of Agriculture effective September 9, 

1956: 

Donald P. Allan, Agricultural Administration at salary 
of $7680 - source of funds, Extension Service 

William H. Lachman, Jr. , Department of Olericulture at 

salary of $7380 - source of funds, Experiment Station 

Arthur S. Levine, Department of Food Technology at 
salary of $7680 - source of funds, Instruction 

Warren Litsky, Department of Bacteriology at salary 
of $7080 - source of funds, Experiment Station 

On the recommendation of the President, the Trustees 

approved the following appointments at rates above minimum: 

Peter Heller, Associate Professor of German at annual 
salary of $6060 effective September 1, 1956. 



1919 



Promotions 



Appointments 



Promotions 



Appointments 



1920 



TRUSTEE 



Promotions 



also 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Gladys Geiger, Instructor of Home Economics at 

annual salary of $4200 effective September 1, 
1956. 

Margaret Mosher, Assistant Professor "A" 4-H Ex- 
tension Service at annual salary of $5940 
effective November 1, 1956. 

On the recommendation of the President, the Trustees 



VOTED : To approve the following list of promotions 
and appointments : 

Associate Professor 

Gladys M. Cook, Department of Home Economics, $6060 
Helen F. Cullen, Department of Mathematics, $5820 
William F. Field, Department of Guidance "A", $6480 
George Goodwin, Jr., Department of Government, $5580 
Benton L. Hatch, Library "A", $5880 
Marshall C. Howard, Department of Economics, $5820 
Robert P. Lane, Department of English, $5820 
Joseph S. Marcus, Department of Civil Engineering, $5820 
Charles F. Oliver, Department of Education, $6060 
George R. Richason, Jr. , Department of Chemistry, $5820 
John E. Roberts, Department of Chemistry, $5820 
H. Duncan Rollason, Department of Zoology, $5820 
Daniel Sobala, Department of Engineering, $5820 
Arthur A. Socolow, Department of Geology, $5340 
Richard S. Stein, Department of Chemistry, $5820 
George P. Weidmann, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 

$5580 
Sidney F. Wexler, Department of Romance Languages, $5580 
John K. Zeender, Department of History, $5820 

Associate Professor "A" 



William B. Becker, Department of Entomology, $6780 

Matthew L. Blaisdell, Farm Department, $6180 

Radie H. Bunn, Department of Agricultural Communications, 

$6780 
Irving S. Fagerson, Department of Food Technology, $6480 
Robert A. Fitzpatrick, Department of Agricultural Economics, 

$6780 
Richard E. Pride, Waltham Field Station, $6480 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Assistant Professor 

Donald K. Adams, Department of Education, $4680 

Luther A. Allen, Department of Government, $4860 

James S. Bosco, Department of Physical Education, $4680 

Louis A. Carpino, Department of Chemistry, $4680 

Richard F. Garber, Department of Physical Education, $4680 

Sarah L. Hawes , Department of Home Economics, $4860 

Walter Hopkins, Department of Mechanical Engineering, $4680 

Vickery Hubbard, Department of Physical Education, $5040 

Robert M. Kingdon, Department of History, $4860 

Stephen Kosakowski, Department of Physical Education, $5040 

Edward P. Larkin, Department of Bacteriology, $5040 

John F. Manfredi, Department of Sociology, $5040 

Earl J. McWhorter, Department of Chemistry, $4680 

Henry B. Peirce, Jr. , Department of Speech, $4860 

Maida L. Riggs, Department of Physical Education, $4860 

Seymour Rudin, Department of English, $4680 

Assistant Professor "A" 

James W. Callahan, Department of Agricultural Economics, $5700 
Elmar Jarvesoo, Department of Agricultural Economics, $5220 

Instructor 

Bertha E. Fessenden, Department of Chemistry, $3840 
Mildred Pierpont, Schedule Office, $4440 "A" 

Instructor "A" 



Basil Bourque, Department of Agricultural Economics, 
$2220 (one -half time) 

Robert W. Murray, Department of Dairy and Animal Science, 
$2220 (one-half time) 

Hira Singh, Department of Agricultural Economics, $2220 
(one -half time) 



It was 



VOTED: 



To approve step-rate increases for members 
of the professional staff of the University 
in accordance with the state schedule as 
earned and payable during the month of 
September 1956. 



It was also 

VOTED : To authorize the President of the University 
to sign, in the name of and for the Board of 
Trustees, all forms including type of action 
forms required for the processing of papers 
through the Division of Personnel and the 
Commission on Administration and Finance. 



1921 




TRUSTEE 



Sabbatical 
Leave 

Mildred L. 
Howell 



Arthur I 

Bourne, 

Emeritus 



May E. Foley 
Emeritus 



Clinical 
Associates 



Commonwealth 
Scholarships 



Conscientious 
Objectors 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



On the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED : To approve the following request for sabbatical 
leave : 

Miss Mildred L. Howell, 4-H Club Leader, 
September 1, 1956 to August 31, 1957 for 
study at Columbia University - 6 months' 
leave with full pay, 1 month annual leave 
with pay, and the remainder leave without 
pay. 

On the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED : To name Arthur I. Bourne, Professor of 
Entomology, Emeritus, effective on the 
date of his retirement October 31, 1956. 

On the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED : To name Miss May E. Foley, Professor of 
Home Economics, Emeritus, effective on 
the date of her retirement October 31, 1956. 

On the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the President to designate 

Clinical Associates of the faculty of the 
School of Nursing from personnel of 
cooperating agencies, such associates 
to be listed in the University Catalogue 
but to serve without pay. 

On the recommendation of the University Commonwealth 

Scholarship Committee and of the President, it was 

VOTED : To approve the attached list of Common- 
wealth Scholarship alternates - this 
list to take the place of previous 
alternates voted by the Board. 

President Mather said that the question of conscientious 

objectors and the required ROTC program of the University has 

been discussed recently by the Administration. He said that he 

has had very few requests for individuals to be excused on 

grounds of being conscientious objectors but that he would like 

to have an understanding of his authority in this matter. After 

discussion, it was 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED ; To authorize the President to excuse 
conscientious objectors from ROTC re- 
quirements. 

On the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to execute for 
and in the name of the Board of Trustees 
a military property bond with the Depart- 
ment of the Army covering Army ROTC property 
in the custody of the University for 
$600,000 and a bond with the Department of 
the Air Force covering Air Force ROTC 
property in the custody of the University 
in the amount of $80,000 in lieu of the 
existing military property bond. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4:00 p.m. 




Secretary 



. ^^jB <^-v£bfc^ Chai 



rman 



1923 



Military 
Property 



1924 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



COMMONWEALTH SCHOLARSHIP ALTERNATES 



It is recommended that the Trustees approve the 
following list of Commonwealth Scholarship alternates to take 
the place of previous lists of alternates. 



2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 



Judson, Paul 
Bo land, Mary 
Levins, W. P. 
Egan, George 
Hofgaard, B. L. 
Gallagher, Suzanne 



1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 



Gaull, Marilyn 
Scott, Frederic 
Lestan, Lois 
Good, Roger 
Seamans , Judith 
Peck, Arthur 



Class of 1957 

Bus. Admin. 
Arts and Science 
Engineering 
Engineering 
Engineering 
Arts and Science 



Class of 1958 

Arts and Science 
Arts and Science 
Arts and Science 
Arts and Science 
Arts and Science 
Engineering 



Class of 1959 



Springfield 

Pittsfield 

Dorchester 

Amherst 

Pittsfield 

Hampden 



Jamaica Plain 

Ashf ield 

Walpole 

Boston 

Halifax 

Pittsfield 



1. 


Morris, Robert J. 


Bus. 


Admin. 


Melrose 


2. 


Trojano, Marylou 


Arts 


and Science 


Brockton 


3. 


Saltiel, David M. 


Arts 


and Science 


Mattapan 


4. 


Connolly, Patricia A. 


Arts 


and Science 


Leominster 


5. 


Saccocia, Carol 


Arts 


and Science 


Brockton 


6. 


Adams, Marcia 


Arts 


and Science 


Stoneham 


7. 


Jenkins, Dorothy 


Home 


Economics 


Andover 


8. 


Daniels, Merelyn 


Arts 


and Science 


Amherst 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

October 13, 1956, 11:00 a.m., Dining Commons, 
Univ. of Mass., Amherst 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Bartlett, Brett, Brown, 
Miss Buxton, Cashin, Crowley, 
Desmond, McDermott, Taber, Whitmore, 
President Mather, Provost McCune, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Burke 



The Trustees spent some time discussing the question of 
whether more frequent meetings of the Board will be necessary but 
came to no conclusion at the moment. It was agreed, however, to 
meet again in Boston on Thursday, November 8, beginning with 
luncheon at 12:30. 

On the recommendation of the President and after 

discussion, it was 

VOTED : To approve the attached personnel actions 
under Chapter 556 of the Acts of 1956. 

It was 

VOTED : To name Roll in H. Barrett, Professor of 

Agricultural Economics, Emeritus, effective 
on his retirement October 31, 1956. 

President Mather said that for some time Government and 
History have been administered as separate departments although 
the courses in Government were originally established in the De- 
partment of History. When the Board named John S. Harris as Pro- 
fessor of Government earlier in the year, it was intended that he b£ 
Acting Head of a Department of Government. However, the action was 
never formalized. After discussion, it was 



1925 



Rollin H. 

Barrett, 

Emeritus 



John S. Harris, 
Head of Govern 
ment 






1926 



TRUSTEE 



» Sabbatical 
Leave - 

Mildred L. 
Howell 



Step-Rate 
Increases 



Barrington 
Survey 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : To establish a Department of Government 
in the College of Arts and Science and 
name Professor John S. Harris as Head of 
the Department effective November 1, 1956, 
with the understanding that he will re- 
ceive proper increase in salary as soon 
as budget provisions may allow. 

On September 7 the Trustees granted sabbatical leave to 
Miss Mildred Howell to be effective beginning in September of 
1956. This action came too late for her to make arrangements for 
the best use of this leave for study purposes and Miss Howell re- 
quests that her leave be postponed so that it will begin 
February 1, 1957. Accordingly, it was 

VOTED : To grant sabbatical leave to Miss Mildred 
L. Howell for one year beginning 
February 1,1957, Miss Howell to be on full 
pay for 6 months beginning February 1, one 
month annual leave with pay and five 
months' leave without pay. 

It was 

VOTED: To approve step-rate increases for members 
of the professional staff of the University 
in accordance with the state schedule as 
earned and payable during the months of 
September and October 1956. 

President Mather said that the Legislature has passed the 

Barrington Report which establishes new salary classifications for 

state employees and it was 

VOTED : To authorize payment of salaries for Uni- 
versity employees in accordance with the 
Barrington schedule as enacted by the State 
Legislature but with the understanding 
that the Trustees reserve the right to re- 
quest adjustments in this schedule. 

The President said that he had authorized Provost McCune 
to locate a Director for the Student Union Building. He said that 
the Provost has done an outstanding job and recommends the appoint- 
ment of Mr. William D. Scott who was the original choice of the 



TRUSTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



William D. 
Scott - 

Director of 

Student 

Union 



faculty committee which was charged with recommending a Director 

for the Union. Mr. Scott has been on campus and interviewed 

members of the administration and the student body. He was also 

interviewed by some Trustees. Mr. Scott holds the A, B. degree from 

Marshall College in 1941 and has his M.A. from the University of 

Michigan in 1947. He is now Director of Tech Union at Texas 

Technological College and served from 1948-1953 as Director of the 

Union at West Virginia University. After discussion of Mr. 6cott's 

qualifications, it was 

VOTED : To appoint Mr. William D. Scott as Director 
of the Student Union effective November 1, 
1956 or as soon thereafter as he reports 
for duty at annual salary of $7644 payable 
from proceeds of the Student Union. 

President Mather said that the Extension Service has 
been searching for some time for a leader of Youth Work to replace Merle L. Howes 
Horace Jones who retired as 4-H Club Leader on May 31, 1956. The 
committee on selection was composed of James W. Dayton, Director 
of the Extension Service, as Chairman, Winifred I. Eastwood, Pro- 
fessor, Head, Extension Division of Home Economics, and Fred P. 
Jeffrey, Associate Dean of the College of Agriculture. The 
committee considered the credentials of 25 candidates and inter- 

s 

viewed 8 candidates. The committee was advised by a committee of 
professional and lay people intimately connected with extension 
work, and recommends the appointment of Mr. Merle L. Howes. 
Mr. Howes is now serving as the Assistant State 4-H Leader at the 
University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. He holds the 
B.S. degree with a major in Agricultural Education from Kansas 
State College and the M.A. degree with a major in Education on a 



1927 



Head, Extension 
Division of 
Youth Work 



1928 



TRUSTEE 



Tuition 
Waived for 
Foreign 
Students 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



fellowship offered by the National Committee on Boys 1 and Girls' 

Club Work. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To appoint Mr. Merle L. Howes to the 

position of Professor "A", Head, Exten- 
sion Division of Youth Work at annual 
salary of $7644 effective November 1, 
1956 or as soon thereafter as he can 
report for duty. 

President Mather said that in 1949 the Trustees 
authorized him to waive tuition for five foreign students each 
year. This authorization has proved very helpful in encouraging 
worthy foreign students to study at the University and has been 
beneficial to our students by giving them an opportunity to meet 
persons from other cultures. 

Recently it has been increasingly difficult for foreign 

students to bring cash out of their countries because of export 

restrictions and the President feels that the time has come to 

increase the number of foreign student tuition waivers. After 

discussion, the Trustees 

VOTED: To authorize the President to waive 
tuition in whole or in part for 10 
foreign students each year, effective 
as of the current semester. These 
students may be either graduate or 
undergraduate students. 

Treasurer Johnson showed a rendering of the west facade 

of the Science Center as prepared by James H. Ritchie and 

Associates. In general the Trustees liked the proposal but 

questioned whether the large blank walls to the left and right of 

the main entrance should contain some decorative feature. 

Treasurer Johnson said that he has discussed the rendering with 

Mr. Larsen, the consulting architect, and he feels that further 

improvement may be possible in the area where the wings connect 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

with the main building. After discussion, it was 

VOTED: To approve the revised design of the 

Science Center subject to action of the 
Treasurer on recommendation of the con- 
sulting architect of the University. 

It was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth W. 
Johnson, to execute a contract with the 
Department of the Army for education 
and training of one graduate student at 
established tuition and fees. 

Treasurer Johnson said that he has talked with Mr, 

Haigis, Chairman of the Committee on Finance, concerning use of 

the Trustees 83 rights of the American Telephone and Teigraph 

Company. Mr. Haigis recommends that 80 of these rights be used 

to subscribe to 8 shares of common stock at 100 and after 

discussion, it was 

VOTED : To use eighty (80) rights of the American 
Telephone and Telegraph Company to sub- 
scribe to eight (8) shares of common stock 
at 100 and to sell the remaining three (3) 
rights. 

Secretary Burke reported that he has received a letter 

from D. Y. Lin, Class of 1912, indicating that he will not be able 

to visit the United States during the coming winter as had been 

expected. The Trustees had earlier voted to award the honorary 

degree LL.D. to Dr. Lin on the occasion of his visit this winter. 



It was 



VOTED : To postpone the awarding of the honorary 

degree LL.D. to Dr. D. Y. Lin, President of 
Chung Chi College until such time as he can 
be present in person to receive the award. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:30 p.m. 



1Q29 



Science 
Center 



Army - 

graduate 

training 



Shares 



Dr. D. Y. Lin 



1930 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



During the luncheon which followed the meeting, Trustee 
Whitmore reported on the 34th Annual Meeting of the Association of 
Governing Boards of State Universities and Allied Institutions 
which was held at the University of Massachusetts September 7-10. 
According to all reports from the visitors this was one of the 
most successful meetings ever held by the Association. Lavish 
compliments were received on the food, lodging, program and 
particularly on President Mather's address. 

President Mather discussed his recent trip to Japan 

> 

under auspices of the International Cooperation Administration of 
the State Department. The purpose of the visit was to examine into 
the possibilities of setting up an exchange program with Hokkaido 
University. Hokkaido was established 80 years ago, the first 
President of that institution being Colonel William S. Clark, 
second president of the University of Massachusetts. President 
Mather was accompanied on this visit by Dean Dale H. Sieling of 
the College of Agriculture and Professor John W. Zahradnik of the 
Department of Agricultural Engineering. The group was very 
hospitably received and the chances look favorable for the de- 
velopment of an exchange program particularly in the fields of 
Agriculture and Home Economics. Any further action in this matter 
will depend upon mutual action by Hokkaido University, the Inter- 
national Cooperation Administration and the Trustees of the Uni- 



versity of Massachusetts 



Secretary 



Chairman 




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TRUSTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
November 8, 1956, 12:30 noon, Hotel Statler, Boston, Mass 
Chairman Bartlett presiding 



PRESENT: Trustees Bartlett, Boyden, Brett, 

Brown, Miss Buxton, Cashin, Crowley, 
Haigis, Hawes, McDermott, Mrs. McNamara, 
Perry, Taber, Whitmore, President Mather, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Burke 

On recommendation of the President and the faculty of 

the University, it was 



VOTED : To promote the following candidates to 
graduation and award the appropriate 
Bachelors' degrees as listed with the 
understanding that each graduate may re- 
ceive his diploma by mail dated November 
1956 or at commencement in June of 1957. 



8, 



On recommendation of the President and the faculty of 

the Graduate School, it was 

VOTED : To promote the following candidates to 

graduation and award the degrees as listed 
with the understanding that each degree 
recipient may receive his diploma by mail 
dated November 8, 1956 or at the commence- 
ment in June of 1957. 

There was discussion as to the best procedure for award- 
ing meritorious service medals to outstanding Alumni and it was 
fe],t that this award should be made through and by the Associate 
Alumni rather than by the Trustees of the University. After 
discussion, it was 

VOTED : To rescind vote of February 6, 1947 "to 
authorize annual award of a meritorious 
service medal to outstanding Alumni of the 
college during the June commencement, the 
names of prospective recipients to be sub- 
mitted by the Associate Alumni through the 
college administration to the Trustees for 
approval" and recommend that the award of 
meritorious service medals to outstanding 
Alumni of the University be made by the 
Associate Alumni. 



1931 



Degrees 



Medals - 

Meritorious 
Service 



1932 



TRUSTEE 



Collectors of 
Animal Blood 
Samples 



University 
Store 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



President Mather said that the University employs 10 
persons under the 03 salary classification with the title of 
Collector of Animal Blood Samples. These men are located in 
various parts of the state and their job is to visit poultry men 
on request and take samples of blood from their flocks. This 
blood is examined at the University for evidence of pullorum in- 
fection. Because these men are employed on 03 account, they have 
not shared in the salary increases common to state employees 
since 1950 and furthermore do not receive workman's compensation, 
vacations, sick leave or retirement benefits. Their rate of pay 
has been $12.00 per day for a number of years. In view of recent 
salary increases granted by the Legislature, the President feels 
that the rate for the Collectors of Animal Blood Samples should 
also be increased. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To increase the rate of pay for Collectors 
of Animal Blood Samples from $12.00 per 
day to $16.00 per day effective November 1, 
1956 with overtime to be paid at the same 
rate. 

The President said that employees of the University 
Store are paid from receipts from the store rather than from 
appropriated state funds. It has been the practice of the Uni- 
versity to keep the salaries of store employees in line with those 
of other state employees. Accordingly, it was 

VOTED : To increase the salaries of employees of 
the University Store in accordance with 
the attached list effective October 1, 1956 
to correspond with salaries of state em- , 
ployees in similar grades which were in- 
creased by act of the Legislature. 



I 



TRUSTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was 

VOTED : To increase the salary of Norman Menegat, 
Head Statistical Machine Operator, from 
$3960 per year to $4238 (Grade 11) per 
year effective October 1, 1956 to correspond 
with salaries of state employees in similar 
grades which were increased by act of the 
Legislature. Mr. Menegat is employed from 
Federal Land-Grant Funds. 

It was 

VOTED : To approve step-rate increases for members 
of the professional staff of the University 
in accordance with state schedule as earned 
and payable during the month. of November 
1956. 

On recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED : To approve the following appointments: 

Frank R. Bridges, Instructor "A", Veterinary Science, 
$5070 per year, effective November 4, 1956 

Katharine Duroe , Assistant Professor "A", Home Economics, 
$5889 per year, effective November 11, 1956 

President Mather said that the Poultry Diagnostic fee 

■ 

of $2.00 per bird has brought an annual income to the University 

of approximately $600. However, the cost of collection probably 

outweighs the annual income and in addition the fee appears to 

be preventing persons from bringing in poultry which should be 

brought in for diagnosis. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To discontinue the Poultry Diagnostic fee 
effective January 1, 1957. 

On recommendation of the Treasurer and the President, 



it was 



VOTED ; To authorize the Treasurer to transfer the 
4-H Club fund from the trust fund classifi- 
cation to the agency fund classification 
effective December 1, 1956. 

On the recommendation of the Treasurer and the President, 



it was 



1933 



Menegat , 
Norman 



Step-Rate 
Increases 



Appointments 



Poultry 

Diagnostic 

Fee 



4-H Club 
Fund 



1934 



Women 1 s 
Dormitory 
Social Fund 



TRUSTEE 



Hous ing - 

for faculty 
and married 
students 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to transfer the 
Women's Dormitory Social Fund from the 
agency fund classification to the recognized 
student organization fund effective 
December 1, 1956. 

Trustee Brett reported for the University of Massa- 
chusetts Building Association on the possibilities for construction 
of apartments for faculty and married students on a self-liqui- 
dating basis. He said that University officials were in agree- 
ment that at least 100 housing units are needed and the 
association's architect believes that apartments can be built at 
a cost of eight to nine thousand dollars per unit. He said an 
average rental of $60 per month per apartment would yield $72,000 
per year on 100 apartments. This income might be discounted by 
207 o by vacancies which would leave an income of $57,600 per year. 
Allowance must be made for administrative and maintenance costs. 
He felt that an investment of $1,000,000 at approximately 3% in- 
terest could be amortized over a period of 27 or 28 years. 

President Mather strongly endorsed the need for apart- 
ment units especially for new instructors and assistant pro- 
fessors. A number of universities are constructing housing for 
faculty usually on the basis that new instructors and assistant 
professors may live in university apartments for three to five 
years depending on the time of attaining tenure. After this 
time they are asked to find housing for themselves in the 
community. The President has investigated the possibility of 
having apartments constructed by private enterprise but believes 
that there is no chance at all of this being done. If the Uni- 
versity is to continue with its plan of expansion, housing for 
faculty and married students is a must. After discussion, it was 



[] 



TRUSTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : To request the University of Massachusetts 
Building Association to obtain authoriza- 
tion for construction of 100 apartment units 
at cost of approximately $1,000,000 - the 
building to be ready for occupancy in the 
fall of 1958. 

Trustee Brett reported that the association has 
authorization for approximately $580,000 for additional con- 
struction of dormitories. According to his discussions with Uni- 
versity officials, another men's dormitory unit is needed for 
completion in September of 1958. On the recommendation of Presi- 
dent Mather, it was 

VOTED ; To request the University of Massachusetts 
Building Association to proceed with con- 
struction of an additional dormitory for 
men students at cost of approximately 
$580,000, building to be completed by the 
fall of 1958. 

President Mather reported on conferences with 
officials of the General Electric plant in Pittsfield relative to 
their request for establishment of a branch of the University in 
Pittsfield to offer courses leading to a degree in Engineering, 
including the degree Bachelor of Electrical Engineering. The 
President said that for some years the University has attempted 
to meet this need by providing courses which were administered and 
financed by the Division of University Extension of the State De- 
partment of Education. General Electric now believes that best 
results can be obtained through direct cooperation of the Univer- 
sity with General Electric. They are ready to enter into an 
agreement with the University whereby they will provide all funds 
including overhead costs for conducting courses in Pittsfield. 
The President believes that the Trustees have authorization to 
administer this program without special state appropriation by 



1935 



University of 
Massachusetts 
Building 
Association 



Dormitory for 
Men 



General 
Electric 



1936 



TRUSTEE 



Treasurer's 
Office - 
reorganizat ion 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



recourse to Section 7 of Chapter 75 of the General Laws. This 

section provides that "The Trustees shall administer property 

held in accordance with special trusts, and shall also administer 

grants or devises of land and gifts or bequests of personal 

property made to the commonwealth for the use of the University, 

and shall execute said trusts, investing the proceeds thereof in 

notes or bonds secured by sufficient mortgages or other 

securities." It was 

VOTED : To authorize the President to proceed with 
negotiations with General Electric toward 
accomplishing the purpose outlined above 
and to bring to the Board a formal agree- 
ment for action by the Board. 

President Mather said that it is necessary to reorganize the 

business and financial pattern of the University to meet the 

greatly increased burdens brought about by rapid growth in both 

capital outlay and maintenance. He proposed that the business 

and financial operations of the University be placed under the 

Treasurer and divided into the following 6 departments: 

1. Department of Financial Management to be headed 
by the Assistant Treasurer. 

2. Department of Budget and Accounts to be headed 
by the Comptroller in the grade of Head of De- 
partment "A" (this would call for a new position) 

3. Department of Audit headed by an auditor in the 
grade of semi-senior accountant (this is re- 
quested in the current budget) 

4. Department of Contracts and Purchasing to be 
headed by a purchasing agent in the grade of 
Head Administrative Assistant (currently this 
work is headed by an Administrative Assistant) 

5. Department of Business Management headed by the 
Business Manager of the University. 



II 



TRUSTEE 



H 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



6. Department of Plant Engineering to be headed by 
a Supervising Engineer in the grade of Head of 
Department "A ,r (this would be a new position) 

The attached outline gives the main responsibilities of 
each of the proposed departments under the Treasurer. 

The President and Treasurer pointed out that recent re- 
ports of the Auditor have called for this type of structure, that 
it will provide a safer system of checks and balances and will pro 
vide the necessary manpower for efficient operation of an expand- 
ing University. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the establishment of the 

business and financial organization pro- 
posed by the President (see attached out- 
line) and to approve the upgradings and 
new positions necessary to establish this 
organization. 

During luncheon members of the Committee on Buildings and 
Grounds met informally to consider architects for (1) the proposed 
School of Education and (2) a proposed Plant Maintenance Building. 

Trustee Whitmore, Chairman of the Buildings and Grounds 
Committee, said that earlier in the week, and after the full Board 
meeting had been called, Mr. Hall Nichols, State Director of 
Building Construction, had offered to provide funds for the employ- 
ment of architects for these buildings. He pointed out that early 
action is necessary if the Trustees are to take advantage of this 
offer. Accordingly he submitted to the Board a list of proposed 
architects in priority order for each building as the informal 
recommendation of individual members of the Buildings and Grounds 
Committee, who had consulted during the luncheon period. After 
discussion, it was 



1937 



School of 
Education 
Building 



Plant 

Maintenance 

Building 



1938 



TRUSTEE 



VOTED: 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



To request the State Director of Building 
Construction to have a study made of the 
School of Education building and Laboratory 
Practice School project and the General 
Maintenance Building project, both con- 
tained in the 1958 capital outlay budget 
request, and to recommend to him the 
following architects in order of preference 
for these projects: 

School of Education Building and Laboratory 
Practice School 

1. James A. Britton, Greenfield 

2. Adden, Parker, Clinch & Crimp, Boston 

3. Morris W. Maloney & Henry J. Tessier, 

Springfield 

Plant Maintenance Building 

1. Morris W. Maloney 6s Henry J. Tessier, 

Springfield 

2. McClintock & Craig, Springfield 

3. James A. Britton, Greenfield 



The meeting was adjourned at 4:10 p.m. 



ypni^uX 



*^W£ ct^va>C ^ Chairman 




jf>^ Secretary 



DEGREES AMABBBD NOVRHS&R 1956" 



§£l}£%£L£!$LJk££&JM& Scie: 



Pater liteard Carr 
Orv*n W. Dillon 

Rofotsrfc Kenneth Finn 



Stevid Frank Coral ey 



D&vid Forbes Johnson 
■$&®&ph Lane Lacier 
Nancy Stoer® 
John Robert O'Connor 
Fr«jac@3 Bernat Ro$a 



Fatal Tiscker Harli 
David Bonner Hintse 

Bachelor of .Saienea 

Richard 0^&n .Carson 
Richard Henry Diakhaut 



Robert Miiliass Sullivan 

Roy Mired Sundatrom 



Richard Fletcher Holdea 



Robert John M&ldron 



S t anl ay Far fcyks 
<Sor«tnn Price 
William Robert Smith 
Million Joseph Sturtavaat 



B§^€^£__oJ_^JL®nc^ 
Robert l„ Biirgeaa 
Meta Cora Millar 
Thowaa Stood Pennock 



SfiJiSS*»5^^B£l£altttra 



Harold A„ Riding 
Robert Janes Startevaat 
Laurence Aldea Mebbar 



. , - , Sg^L^ Qtositteaa Arialnis tration 



Robert Kent Bergassm" 
Theodore Edtaard Bliaa 
Harold John Bowers 
Jordan George Ch«tis 
Thonas Aeguetloe Farragher Jr c , 



Lomis J. Geballla Jr, 



John S B Minters J't, 

»ggglggj»f . Baianca in Chenieal iminiftrinF'"^^^ 
John Charles Winkiey ~* — «— a 

Ig£fa£lgL-g |..3eia nca in Civil Eaeinniring 

Carlton fioyce Calbam Robwrt Lf 

Richard Kenneth Mason 
Raynaud Bhodas ~~" — J»_ — _jft 



Mar ran John E&ns&deil 
Mill tan Dngaid Stubbing* 

Merrill Bradley Mallear 



l!gg£glg£..M. , S g M'^J^Pjjaj^anical Eigiacerina 

Daassee Zaphorin Caoaetta ~ ' 

Alfred Robert Dnfve 

Robert Million Littlauaod 
George E Sw 



Janes John Dwnfc: ..•■«.> 
Robert Aldoaa Hewlett 



n 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

GRADUATE SCHOOL 

CANDIDATES FOR ADVANCED DEGREES 
MASTER OF SCIENCE 



Clarence W e Bennett 

(Education) 
John David Eoyle 

(Wildlife Management ) 
Franz Brand! 

(Food Technology) 
Harvey G. Cadwell 

(Education) 
William M, Cary, Jr. 

(Education) 

Francis P* DiGiammarino 

(Education) 
Robert H, Domina 

(Education) 
Alice R. Dowd 

(Education) 
Frederick E. Ellis 

(Education) 
Sanford Golin 

(Psychology) 
Hugh S, Hayden 

(Education) 
Henry Louis Houde 

(Psychology) 
Katherine Willis Irvin 

(Food Technology) 



John Frederick Keith 

(Education) 
Rita P. Kurty 

(Education) 
Harvey Lifton 



( Psychology 



L 



Saundra Rose Idsk 

(Psychology) 
William Mar den 
(Education) 

Mary E, McManamy 

(Education) 
William R, Minardi 

(Education) 
Noel Reebenacker 

(Education) 
.Wal ter-^) Richard 

(Education) 
Edward M. Trauschke, Jr. 

(Education) 
Frederick N. Trimm, Jr. 

(Education) 
Reta P. Watson 

(Education) ^ 
Enrique Yanez-Cortes 

(Food Technology) 
Frank W, Ye aw 

(Education) 



MASTER OF ARTS 



Ann Ruth Kennedy 
(Zoology) 



Victor Anthony Triolo 
(Zoology) 



MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING 



Marjorie Schupack Ryack 
(Ed.ucation) 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

David Jordan Sands 
(Psychology) 

Arnold Saul Roseman 
(Food Technology) 



November 1, 19£6 



I 



UHZVESSXTY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Recoassended Salaries of University Store Etirployacs 
Effective October 1 9 1956 



Old 



Harrington 



n 



Broadfcot, Mary L. 
Crasser, Hancy E. 
Golas, Madeline 
Goodrich, Fred A. 
Jensen, Antoinette 
Lanson, Mary Jane 
Mullen, Rosaline E. 
Rogers, Janice 
Ryan, Augustine J. 
Sears, Fred G. Jr. 
San Soucie, Dora 
Trider, Lucille 
Turner, Clara T. 



Title 



Senior Bookkeeper 



Junior Glerk 



Junior Glerk 



Stock Clerk 



Junior Clerk 



Junior Clerk 



Fountain Supervisor 



Junior Clerk 



Univ. Store Mgr. 



Asst. Manager 



Junior Clerk 



Junior Clerk 



Jr. Clerk & Stonog. 



Grade 


Salary 


Grade 


Salary 


17 


$3540 


07 


$4004 


06 


2760 


02 


3029 


06 


2280 


02 


2444 


12 


2880 


06 


3224 


06 


2760 


02 


3029 


06 


2230 


02 


2444 


17 


3420 


07 


3861 


06 


2289 


02 


2444 


52 


6180 


15 


6760 


31 


4680 


11 


5213 


06 


2280 


02 


2444 


06 


2230 


02 


2444 


03 


2760 


03 


3250 



1 



Hoveaber 7 fl 1956 



mvimsiTz of MASSACHUsms 



ORGANIZATIONAL PLAN FOR BUSINESS AS© FIHAKCE 



TRUSTEES 



PRESIDENT 



TREASURER 



Department of Financial Management 
Assistant Treasurers U of M 

Department of Budget and Aeeounts 
Comptroller, U of Si ° Kead of Depto "A" (new) 

Department of Audit 
Auditor, U of M (Sesai<=3enlor Account ant ° budgeted 

Depart&eat of Contracts and Purchasing 

Purchasing Agent - Administrative Assistant 
(Should be Head Administrative Assistant) 

Departsent of Business Kanegesient 
Business Manager, U of M 

Departsent of Plant Engineering 

Supervising Engineer » Kead of Dept» "A" (new) 



DEPARTMENT OF FINANCIAL MAHAGEMENT 



Assistant Treasurer, U of M 

Receipts 

Disbursements 

Investments 

Research Contracts and Grants 

Student Loans 

Scholarships 

Student Deposits 

Gifts and Bequests 



DEPARTMENT OF BUDGET AHD ACCOUNTS 



Controller, U of M - ®iesd of Depto "A"» U of 

Accounting 

Budget Preparation 
Budgetary Control 
Pre~Audit and Scheduling 
Billing 

Payroll Preparation 
Statistical Machine Service 
. Financial Reports 



DEPARTMENT OF AUDIT 

Auditor (S@sti»Senior Accountant) 

Audits 
Reports 

DEPARTMENT OF CONTRACTS AHD> PURCHASES 

Purchasing Agent (Administrative Assistant) 
(Should be « Head Administrative Assistant) 

State- Fund Purchasing 
Trust^Fund Purchasing 
Contracting 
Sales 



DEPARTMBHT OF BUSINESS HAHAG&SRT 



Bus In eft Keaager, U of M 

Secretary 

Senior Clerk end Stenographer 

Per sottae 1 Office 

Administrative Assistant 
Junior Clerk & Typist ° 2 

Boardiag Halls 
Manager of Boarding Hal Is s U of H 
and Staff 

Mail Service 

Senior Messenger 

Property Records Section 
Friacipal Clerk 

Telephone Service 

Head Telephone Operator 
and Staff 

Military Property Section 



DEPARTMEHT €F PIAHT ENGINEERING 

Supervising Engin&er, U of M - Head of B©pt« "A" 

Secretary 

Senior Clark & Stenographer 

Engineering & Planning Section 
{Supervising Engineer) 

Landscape Architect (part^tia® professor a) 
Senior Engineering Aid 
Senior Clerk & Typist (new) 
Consultants = Special Projects 
Architects 
Engineers, etc* 

Construction Supervision & Inspection Section 
(Supervising Engineer) 

job=Qrder Control Section 
(Supervising Engineer) 

Plant Records Section 

Security Section 
Chief Campus Police Officer & Fire fiarsh*! 
Campus Police Officers • 3 
Might Watetacsn 

Stock Control Section 
Storekeeper, etCo 

Receiving & Issue Section 
Head Storekeeper, etc 

Plant Maintenance & Operation 

Superintendent of Buildings & Grounds, If of I 

Secretary & Office 
Preventive Maintenance Unit 

Power Plant 
Chief Institution Power Plant Engineer 
end Staff 

Buildings Maintenance 

Superintendent of Buildings, of H, 
and Staff 

Grounds Maintenance 

Superintendent of Grounds 
end Staff 

Custodial Maintenance 
Supervisor of Janitors 
and Staff